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'4- 



LIBRARY 



OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



NO. DATE 

SOURCE 



■ 

I 









Mi 



v 

■ 1 




Captain F. A. Cutter. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. SEPTEMBER 26. 1906 



NO. 1 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
c^ . -HAiumni .requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. College S.onal. Amhekst. Mass. The S.ohal will be 
JSTH^JSZ ^rrdton^nce.s ordered and a paid. Subscribers who do no, rece.ve their paper reguUr.y ,r, re.ue.ted f 

notify the Business Man ager. __ __ — — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 

RALPH JEROME WATTS. 1907. Business Manager. 

HERBERT L1NWOOD WHITE. 1908. Assistant Business Manager. 

J DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. .908. Department Notes. ALLAN D ANA ARR AR. £08, Reporter. 

GEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR.. 1909. ORWELL BURLTON BRIGGS. 1909. 



Term., »l.QO per ^er in -dc*nc. Single Cop!-, H)c. Po.Ug. oufid. .« Uoif d State, end C.n.d., He .*r.. 



Y. M. C A. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Readir.g-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

C. H. White. Pres. Athletic Association, 

M. H. Clark. Jr.. Manager. Base-Ball Association. 

R. W. Peakes. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index. 

J. N.Summers. Sec. Fraternity Conference. 

Basket-ball Association. H. T. Pierce. Manager. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec 
F. A. Cutter. Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
A. T. Hastings. Pre:,. 



Entered as second-class matter. Pott Office at Amherst. 



ECdi'tori&.s. 



This issue of the Signal appears one week earlier 
than any previous first number during the last four 
years, at least. It was deemed best to publish this 
issue because of the fact that if we waited until the 
first week of October the greetings and news of the 
vacation would be stale and uninteresting. Any mis- 
takes or deficiency of material must therefore be 
excused In view of the hasty preparation and lack of 
time afforded to the several editors. 



The long-awaited event has transpired, and Presi- 
dent Butterfield is now at the head of M. A. C. To 
be sure, his official connection with the college and 
faculty began on July 1 , but his relations with the 
student-body only commenced on last Thursday 
morning. The warmth of the greeting when he first 
appeared at chapel plainly showed the anticipation 
with which the undergraduates have looked forward to 
his coming. Mr. Butterfield's remarks on the first 



morning indicated plain common sense and were quite 
felicitous. His assurance of a "square deal for 
everyone" attracted especial attention, for many have 
considered, justly or unjustly, that in the past they 
have been discriminated against by powers higher up. 
While President Butterfield declined to announce a 
definite policy, those who read between the lines saw 
a determination to eliminate the bad and preserve the 
good and at the same time to gradually infuse new 
ideas which his experience in other fields has shown 
to be beneficial to colleges of our type. In general, 
his aim is to be a constant effort for a larger and 
better Mass'chusetts. In this respect it is identical 
with the policy of the Signal which has been 
expressed several times. For this reason we feel an 
especial interest in the beginning of the new adminis- 
tration and we sincerely hope that at all times the 
most intimate co-operation will exist between the 
editorial staff of the Signal and the president's office. 
As the official representative of the student body we 
again welcome Mr. Butterfield to his new position. 
All hail the new president. 



V v 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



At the beginning of a new college year we should 
profit by the experience of the past and start out with 
a determination to extend the fame of Massachusetts 
yet farther abroad. To do this we must first be 
unified by an abundant college spirit. Fortunately 
the means to obtain this end is near at hand. 
Nothing Is so promotive of enthusiasm as a football 
team. Somehow no athletic teams command so 
much homage as do the football men. During the 
season which has just commenced we must turn all 
our energ.es to support the team, first by financial 
assistance to the manager and secondly with the moral 
assistance imparted by standing on the side lines and 
cheering at both practice and real games. In so doing 
we shall not only help on the team to victory but we 
shall also increase that esprit du corps which is so 
essential for the good name of the college. Well do 
we remember the remarkable outburst of college spirit 
in the fall of 1903 when just before the game with 
Amherst college, It fairly overran everything else. 
Now that we are to play Amherst this year, an 
attempt should be made to rival that record. Let us 
all get together so that if, as is most likely, a con- 
siderable number of the alumni return for that game, 
they will be proud of the college of which they are gradu- 1 
ates. But, whatever is done, much of the responsi- 
bility in such matters rests on the members of the 
senior class. Commanding as they do the highest 
position among the undergraduates, the leadership 
naturally falls upon them, and to the class of 1907 the 
rest of the college looks for the inspiration of all move- 
ments which shall increase the fame and honor of 
Massachusetts. 



The ceaseless march of time during the last three 
monihs has caused the hazy days and warm evenings, 
existing when we left Amherst, to give place to the 
cerulean skies and frosty nights of autumn. From 
all parts of our Commonwealth and neighboring states 
we have returned to dear, old Massachusetts for 
another year with its joy and its sorrow, its study and 
its play and all that goes to make up that enjoyable 
phase of existence "college life. "-The Signal gladly 
welcomes all of its old friends. Some of us will never 
come back again as undergraduates, and to them shall 
be the honor and glory during the year as Seniors. 
Others strong in numbers and enthusiasm have passed 



the most trying part of their course and now as upper- 
classmen will assist in the government of the other 
halt Yet others have acceptably become initiated 
into the student-body of the college, and, while the 
coming year is always characterized by an hilarious 
outburst of sophomore joyousness, still they must gird 
on the armor of might if they Intend to conquer. We 
are happy to bid welcome to a new class which has 
come in to fill the ranks depleted by the loss of '06. 
We hope that you men come to college to make the 
most of your opportunities, to prepare yourselves for a 
future career of success, and one which will reflect 
credit upon the the college which you attend. But 
there are certain ideas which every editor of the 
Signal feels in duty-bound to express to the entering 
class. In this matter we can do no better than to 
quote a characteristic editorial from this paper pub- 
lished October 4, 1905. "With the opening of the 
college year and the issue of the college paper.for the 
first time comes the inevitable word of advice to fresh- 
men. At the best It is apt to be repitition, but why 
shouldn't it be ? Are the present freshmen any more 
or less green than those who have gone before ? As 
yet they have shown no such tendencies. Freshmen 
are apt to think that their lot is a hard one, to scoff at 
I what they term the overbearing of the upperclassmen 
and to tremble at the tyranny of the sophomores who 
give them the best of character-making treatment 
which, however, is seldom appreciated at the time. 
If any freshman thinks that he is not getting the atten- 
tion which he deserves, that his talents are not 
recognized, just let him remember that who he is, or 
what he can do,are unknown quantities. In this Insti- 
tution a man stands on his own merits alone, neither 
money, pull, nor ancestors makes the man here. 
Massachusetts men stand on their own merits and if 
you wish to be classed as one show us what you can 
do. We do not refer to any spectacular display of 
your talents but we do mean that you do your duty to 
self class and college and In so doing your position in 
college will be established. This is probably your last 
chance for further education so it behooves you to do 
well. On what you get here largely depends your 
earning capacity in the future and your position in life. 
Some who have gone out before have become famous 
in their lines of work, others have sunk into oblivion ; 
it is up to you to which class you shall belong. Now 



is your time to start life anew, profiting by the mis- 
takes of the past, full of renewed ambitions and 
desires, plunge into the work of the college with all 
your might. Show us that you have an active part in 
its actions, work for its welfare and before you realize 
it you will feel that you are one of us and that Massa- 
chusetts is your college." 



/Uhletic No**S- 




The football team came out on Wednesday of last 
week for the first practice. Since then light work 
has been tried every day and running down and catch- 
ing punts practiced. The last of the week, work was 
begun with the tackling-dummy. George E. 
O'Hearn, captain of the 1903 team, will be head 
coach, an honor never before held by an M. A. C. 
man. There are about eight men of last year's team 
available this year :— Captain Cutter, Philbrick, 
Willis. Farley, Summers, French, Crossman and 
Clark. Then there are quite a number of players 
who appeared in a few games last year and others 
who did good work on the second team. Several 
promising men appear in the freshmen class, but not 
enough playing has yet been seen to judge of their 
abilities. The coming season should be especially 
interesting as Harvard is played for the first time and 
he game with Amherst has been restored to the 
chedule. A scrub team, to afford practice to the 
earn, is being got together, and placed under the 
charge of Philbrick, the varsity fullback. 

Manager Clark has made one or two changes in 
the schedule and also added one game so it seems 
well to reprint it. 

Sept. 29, Holy Cross at Worcester. 
Oct. 3, Williams at Williamstown. 
Oct. 6, N. H. State at Amherst. 
Oct. 10, Brown at Providence. 
Oct. 13, Harvard at Cambridge. 
Oct. 17, Wesleyan at Middletown. 
Oct. 20, Dartmouth at Hanover. 
Oct. 27, R. I. State at Amherst. 
Nov. 3, Amherst at Amherst. 
Nov. 10, Tufts at Medford. 
Nov. 17. Springfield T. S. at Springfield. 
With the call for football candidates on last Wed- 



nesday, the season for 1906 is now on, and with it 
the probable passing of the old style game to a new 
and untried sport, so to speak. 

For a number of years back leaders of the game 
have looked for big muscular men, who could give and 
take. But the public stepped in ; mass plays, close 
formations, and such gruelling tactics, first made the 
game uninteresting from the spectator's standpoint, 
and then the frequency of Injuries was such that 
many thought that the death knell of college football 
was about to be rung. 

Fortunately such a radical measure was unnecess- 
ary for, the Rules Committe, after long and animated 
sessions, revised and made new rules, which will 
undoubtedly change the style of play and eliminate 
many of the rougher features of the old game, and 
also give speed and brain, without ponderous weight, 
a better chance. 

The 10 yards in 3 downs, the onside kicks, and ttM 
forward pass rules, are three of the most important 
changes, and already many teams are in secret prac- 
tice trying out feasible formations to meet the new 
requirements. 

That there will be more open play there is no doubt, 
and to the ordinary spectator uninitiated to the inside 
play of football, the game will double its interest, 
while to the loyal rooter, it will be filled with so many 
untried and exciting situations that more than once he 
will feel sure that his heart has leaped from its cus 
tomary cardiac region, as he excitedly rushes up and 
down the side lines trying to keep close to the course 
of play. 



CHANGES IN THE FACULTY. 

In addition to the change in presidential adminis- 
tration this year, several minor revisions have been 
made in the teaching force. Clarence E. Gordon, 
B. S., Ph. D. ( an M. A. C. man, and afterward 
graduate student at Columbia and instructor at Cush- 
ing academy, will take Doctor Lull's place as associate 
professor of zoology. Mr. Gordon was prominent 
when here in college, and was editor-in-chief of this 
paper during his senior year. The position of assist- 
ant professor of English and instructor of German, left 
vacant by Professor Babson, has been filled by the 
selection of Robert W. Neal. Mr. Neal received his 
A. B. and A. M. from the university of Kansas and 



llhj-i- 



* i 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






^^^othe former office,, wo com- 
First-lieutenant C. 



to. Leh freshman history this l-rji — » * ™°J sec0 P nd ,,eu,enan, of A company. 

____________ ■ " t he two lower classes. It wouiu vv 

_Th« following «•« >»» "" C °" ege ' P,e ' Ce ' .0 disobey this edict. „ 

Uncorn and Lamed. -Granolithic walks N*J»JJ*2 bulldlne 

_p. G. Cardln, '09, has been entertaining his 
brother for a few days. has been lowerea _ , , he 

j F Lyman, '05, H. A. Suhlke, "06. and R. and , paved gutter on the upper P« ( 

w7peakes '06, nave been about college recently. ^^ Walk , s als0 a much needed Imp 



_G,ano,l.hlc wa = ~~ ■- ^ bu „ dlng 

hall and the grade of the road in ^ 

has been lowered about a foot. A 
cinder and a paved gutter on the l . 
■06 have been aoou, —^ - , Botanic Walk is also a much needed P 

_ D ur,„g.he vacation fresh «*- J»«^U **«. •»! ~ _ „ „. 1907 w« 
added to Prof. Hasbrouck's house and to the farm | _ There arest „ 
hou and barn of the Hatch experiment stahon. 

1 , .. _g 4W. M A C. StU 



-There are still a few copies of the 

A considerable number of the M. A. C. students ,„„ college an „uals can be °*™° 5 , art , 

_A _f." l',, n „, a ,r.lval of Amherst college m ,, 0snou , d be interested m these boo 



r vt«n,r,o.t imhers, House during the latter 
P ^:Xtyo,a,argenumbero. young lady 

slud e,„s coming up ,0 MA. C •- S*»~C* 

lege in Boston was revived this fall, dim 
hLbeenasmuchofa^fake-'asusuaL 

Progress on the new barn has been greatly 
— rrogrebb u Officii tv found 



collection of Indexes wh.ch will recall 

^rge r the natural beauties o, the P - an 
a(f0 rd a pleasing contrast tc , * ; *> "^ 



th» new barn has been greatly {f d a pleasing contrasi iu m- R , , . 

„ - Pr0 erd S ;r«n g. summer ", the difficult, found K^, appea rance during the reg.me o, Mr. Blake 
;Zm . "«sLy iron-work. bu, duringthe -L* 
ew ^ ks <he building has gone up rapidly. _ By . recent rui, g tt-SW ^ 

The new rifles with the blade bayonets """school numerals or letters wdhrea, 
—The new , han the he campui . This is an c* 

'"^hlTTrA hand-book has been delayed clge spirit s,ronge^____ 

this vear by unfortunate circumstances but we are enr0 ,i m ent at Amherst 

lentouderstand ,haU, makKUP ta '^l h «IS- above 460, the figures of 

^cyin publication b, the materia, contained in it , year « > - ^ pecu „ ar 
L its excellent press work. »'»«'; (rom lhe Middle West and over 

^~ ^t^ ^M" ^ - — ll,are,rom 
STil 1 Si - ouiidinj and the smail, 1 New Vork state. 



CLASS OF iqio. 

Allen, R. B., Fall River. 
Annis, R. E., Natick. 
Bailey, Wareham. 
Bartlett, L.C., So. Hadley. 
Beeman, West Brookfield. 
Bigelowe, Princeton. 
Blaney, Swampscott. 
Brooks, H. A., Holliston. 
Brooks, S. C, Amherst. 
Brown, E. H., Bridgewater. 
Brown, L. C, Bridgewater. 
Brandt, Everett. 
Burrill, So. Weymouth. 
Call, Lynn. 

Cary. Gansevoort, N. Y. 
Chaffee, Oxford. 
Chase, North Adams. 
Clarke, Milton, N. Y. 
Cloues, Warner, N. H. 
Cowles, H. T., Worcester. 
Curtis, W. E., Worcester. 
Damon, Concord Junction. 
Dickinson, Amherst. 
Drohan, Belchertown. 
Eldridge, Harwichport. 
Everson, Hanover. 
Fisk. Stoneham. 
Folsom, Billerica. 
Francis, Dennisport. 
Gould, Cambridge. 
Hastings, New York Mills, N. Y. 
Hatch. Springfield. 
Haynes, Sturbridge. 
Hazen, Springfield. 
Holland, Shrewsbury. 
Howe, Watertown. 
Huang, Tientsin. 
Johnson, So. Framingham. 
Kelley, A. C, Harvich. 
Kelley, E. N., Sturbridge. 
Lambert, Miss, West Brighton. 
Leonard, L. E., Pittsford, Vt. 
j Leonard, W. E., Belmont. 
^tLightbody, So. Framingham. 
Lipman, Woodbine, N. J. 
McGraw, Fall River. 



McLaine, New York, N. Y. 
Mendum, Roxbury. 
Moore, Leominister. 
Newcomb, Fitchburg. 
Nickless, Billerica. 
Nielsen, West Newton. 
Oertel, So. Hadley Falls. 
Orr. L. J., Portland, Me. 
Orr, P. E., Portland, Me. 
Partridge, Cambridge. 
Prouty, Worcester. 
Rockfeller, Germantown, N. Y. 
Schermerhorn, Kingston, R. I. 
Smith, H. S., Nyack, N. Y. 
Smith, S. S.,Athol. 
Stalker, So. Framingham. 
Stockwell, Athol. 
Sullivan, A. J., Dalton. 
Taylor, 1. H., Leverett. 
I Thomas, Concord. 
Titus, New Braintree. 
Turner, Reading. 
Urban, Upton. 
Vinton, Sturbridge. 
Waldron, Hyde Park. 
Wallace, Amherst. 
Whitney, Brockton. 
Woodward, Worcester. 

One addition to the Sophomore class has been 
m ade in the person of Mr. E. L. Hsldh, Tientsin, 
who has been a student at Pei Yang University, 
Tientsin. 



THE NEW TUG OF-WAR. 

The tug-of-war between the sophomores and fresh- 
men mentioned In the commencement number of the 
S.cnal took place on Friday, Sept. 21. A rope 300 
feet long was stretched across that portion of the pond 
directly east of the chapel. By rule of the senate 
the contestants on each side were limited to ninety 
per cent, of the members of the smaller class. The 
sophomores were allowed the choice of sides and 
selected the western bank. It was found by compu- 
tation that the number of men on each side should be 
fifty-one and these were accordingly mustered. The 
event was scheduled to occur at four o'clock and just 
before that hour towns-people began to gather as 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



spectators. In addition to many who walked, the elec- 
tric railroad brought two carloads to the campus and 
the company kept on arriving until a crowd of 500 
had gathered. Owing to various incidents, it was 
nearly 4-25 when the referee, Prof. Samuel F. How- 
ard selected by the two captains, fired his revolver, 
and the contest began. For a short time the fresh- 
men had the ascendancy and '09 gradually began to 
move toward the murky waters below. Then the 
freshman energy seemed to give way and in their turn 
they started for the water. When the first 1910 
man struck the water the contest was virtually 
decided and soon the freshn.cn were sliding through 
th- mud and water for the opposite shore. Less than 
five minutes after the first pistol shot was fired all of 
the rope had accumulated on the sophomore side and, . 
this of course awarded the victory to that class. The 
class of 1909 after marching around the chapel with 
the rope in their hands gathered in front of South 
college and all the classes present, graduate and 
undergraduate, "bunched up" and made things lively 
with their several yells. Then the rope was gathered 
up and left with the senate to be used in a similar 
contest next year. 

As this was the first contest of the kind occuring in 
this part of the country, a word of comment is permis- 
sible. The affair seems to have been an unqualified 
su-'c^ss and no one could be found who did not regard 
it favorably. Several members of the faculty openly 
expressed their approval and in all respects the event 
seems to be the best contest for supremacy which 
can be arranged between ihe two underclasses. The 
slugging and barbarism of the campus rush and its 
unsatisfactory successor, the pole rush, were elimin- 
ated and what is an even greater advantage, a posi- 
tive decision, was reached. We certainly hope that 
the idea will be repeated in coming years until it 
becomes a regular incident of the first Friday after- 
noon after college opens. The senate should receive 
the congratulations of everyone for instituting this 
interesting and civilized rope-pull. The present board 
can justly say that they have done for the college 
more than all of their predecessors since the board 
was instituted. Let the good work continue. 

-«» 

The entering class at Smith this year numbers 
450, being a trifle larger than last year. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL. 

The presence of so many new men in college 
makes it necessary to insert a short explanation con- 
cerning the college paper and its place among the 
student publications. In past years the Signal and 
its predecessor, the Agg.e L>fe, have been published 
under two different policies. At times an attempt 
has been made to unite a literary periodical with a 
college newspaper, while some editorial boards have 
excluded all literary features. The latter arrange- 
ment has prevailed for the last two years. It is sel- 
dom that articles are submitted which can claim 
much praise as literature, and after all, there does not 
seem to be much demand for this kind of reading 
matter The existing board of editors believes that 
while not much real news for the students appears in 
the paper, still to the alumni and others interested in 
the college who reside outside of Amherst and Us 
vicinity, the events which are constantly occurring at 
M A C can never be known except through the 
columns of the Signal. To such readers fiction and 
poetry are largely undesired, for much better examples 
of both can be found in the flood of monthly maga- 
zines on the market. Since we publish no literary 
articles unless of exceptional merit, it is somewhat 
hard to say just what sort of material should be sub- 
mitted in order to become eligible for an editorial 
position. It matters little what style of articles are 
handed in :-editorials, athletic write-ups, communi- 
cations upon pertinent subjects, will all be received 
and whe-. the required three have been submitted, 
the name of the contributor will be placed on the 
eligible list from which the next vacancy will be filled. 
It is improbable that many of these contributions will 
be published and if the writer desires to see his article 
in print, his aim should be to present a subject of 
peculiar interest to our readers in such a way that it 
will command close attention from them and not a 
mere passing notice. 



- ^ 

Several of the western agricultural colleges have 
established courses in agricultural journalism. It 
seems as if the conservative eastern institutions would 
do well to copy some of these innovations. In the 
absence of any such courses at M. A. C, it is plainly 
necessary for one who desires such training to get on- 
to the Signal board. 



FRATERNITY PLEDGING. 

It seems well to call the attention of members of 
the freshman class to the rule by which the four fra- 
ternities In college have agreed not to pledge new 
members until after the Christmas recess. The wis- 
dom of this arrangement is evident. If it were not 
so, very undesirable people would often be obtained, 
because we have not yet the facilities for investigat- 
ing prospective students in advance. Beside this the 
undue attention showered on the freshmen is apt to 
turn their heads at an early stage in the game and 
thus delay their assimilation into the student-body. 
Anyone who has occasion to enter Amherst by train 
or trolley at a Mme just before the other college opens 
realizes well the force of these statements. Only this 
very fall the writer of this article was hauled up by 
several parties on his return to college and subjected 
to petty annoyance by those who saw in him a pos- 
sible freshman for "old Amherst." As these people 
were utter strangers to him It is quite evident that 
fraternities recruited in such a promiscuous way tend 
to become examples of all that is bad in fraternity 
lines while the good features have little chance for 
development. 



association such that it will appeal to the best interests 
of every man in college. Although last year, with 
its membership of over 100 men, the association 
proved tc be such a grand success, this year augurs 
for a much greater advancement in the life of the 
association. W. 09. 



THE Y. M. C. A. 

The various activities of college are now fast 
rounding into shape for the coming year and among 
these the college Young Men's Christian Association 
is by no means taking a second place. Representa- 
tives from the association attended Northfield confer- 
ence at the close of college, where they received new 
suggestions and inspirations for the work. During 
the summer months the membership committee has 
been busily engaged in carrying on a correspondence 
with the new men. Many have been greatly helped 
by members of the association in finding rooms, 
boarding places, etc. 

In order that the new men may become better 
acquainted with the president, faculty, and with each 
other, a reception will be given on the evening of 
Friday, the 28th. Every man in college should be 
present at this time. Athletics and various other 
interests pertaining to plans for the future will be 
brought forth. 

The officers and members of the association are 
thoroughly in earnest and are determined to make the 



THE AUTOCRAT. 

The Autocrat makes his appearance, from a long 
retirement, to comment upon certain timely features 
connected with the opening of college. 

In a certain room of South college is a large and 
bulky book. This book is called by sundry persons 
"The Book of Judgement" and other fantastic names. 
On one of the first pages is a statement :— "I hereby 
pledge myself upon the honor of a gentleman, that so 
long as I am a student In the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college, I will abstain f-om any and all acts that 
may interfere with the personal rights and privileges 
of any fellow student and which are commonly 
characterized as 'hazing,* " etc., the rest does not 
concern us. The Autocrat is not aware of the 
reason for which this pledge was inserted in the 
registration book but he presumes (and is not the 
presumption justified?) that the framers of these care- 
fully worded phrases were searching for a method to 
stop hazing. The Autocrat Is very much inclined to 
doubt the feasibility of such a move. Hazing can be 
controlled to a considerable extent, but It is In very, 
very few situations that the new-comer Is not 
exposed to more or less humiliation by those who 
have been there longer and therefore "know the ropes 
better." The degree of severity characterizing the 
"hazing" varies all the way from the Incipient forms 
practiced by the lady clerks in a government office to 
the wild and reckless stunts performed in large manu- 
facturing plants, and, we regret to say, in some institut- 
ions of learning. But the Autocrat is not attempting 
to defend hazing, he simply wishes to show before 
reaching the gist of his remarks that it is a part of 
human nature and we all know that to attempt an 
overturning of such laws Is a task which few dare to 

tackle. 

It sometimes happens, to revert to the big book, 
that we hear of a person who declines to sign that 
pledge and then the officer in charge must politely 
refuse that man admittance to college, for the ru.es 



°*^c 



yv 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




established by the authorities are mandate ry_ Sup^ 
pose that a man declines to sign this pledge because 
Te nows, as any sane person who is at all acquainted 
with college does know, that this agreement to 
broken with impunity. If that man enters co eg< .he 
must sign his name and, rather than end his connec- 
Tn w the college before he enters, he deliberately 
agrees over his own signature, to do what he knows 
very well he will not do. The Autocrat as he has 
said before, is not much of a moralist but he has 
vague suspicions of a slight crookedness in the 
alects of the situation at this point. The Autocrat 
believes that, if the faculty is going to require every 
student to pledge himself in refrainment of a I hazing 
acts, then something should be done to stop this 
besetting sin. In fact, he is led to believe from the 
inconsistency of their position that the authorities of 
the college do not altogether disbelieve in this system 
of keeping the freshman class tame and in subjection 
And if this is true, the Autocrat heartily agrees with 
them but he does not like the fence which shelters 
them from the demands of an outraged public a 
body which may at any moment rise up >n all the 
fury of popular rage. In brief, the Autocrat does 
not have very positive opinions one way or the other 
on the milder forms of hazing, he believes that indeed 
a gentle reminder administered in homeopathic 
measure goes a great way to rub off the rough cor- 
ners of a freshman. The sole object sought by the 
Autocrat in writing these lines is to point out countless 
breaches of honor for which the authors of this rule 
have been responsible. It does not seem right for any 
person or persons to assume a position which shall 
openly invite others to lie and without compunction 
break "their honor as a gentleman." If, as is cer- 
tainly entirely proper, the faculty is to take a positive 
stand in the open against hazing should they not make 
an active move toward its elimination instead of rest- 
ing with the mere formality of a rule to which no one 
pays any attention? 



Williams opened this year with about 150 fresh- 
men A large number of new rules have been made, 
the most general one being a requrement that all 
freshmen attend nineteen-twentieths of the total num- 
ber of recitations. The other classes are allowed ten 
per cent cuts. 



THE 1906 SENIOR PROM. 

Although the senior promenade which occurred at 
,UP M.June 19, in the drill hall might fairly be 
called "ancient history", still as this is the first issue 
of the Signal since that date, it seems fitting to 
insert the following account of it. 

The hall was beautifully decorated with pink and 
green and white bunting. The side walls were com- 
pletely covered by the bunting and the cieling was 
shut off by streamers of bunting. Alternate electric 
lights of maroon and white were placed along the 
side walls. A large, beautiful Massachusetts banner 
was stretched along the balcony at the south end of 
the hall. Over the doorway, on a black ground, whs 
a large "M '06," in maroon electric lights. The 
patronesses were seated in a large booth at the south 
end of the hall, adjoining two other larger booths. 
Two booths were situated under the balcony on the 
east side, and one booth was in each of the corners 
at the north end of the hall. In these booths were 
corner seats covered with college sofa pillows and 
easy chairs. The booths were shut off from the 
main hall by draperies and potted plants. Along the 
sides of the hall were scattered Morris chairs and 
sofas. The orchestra was situated in the middle of 
I the floor on a raised staging, surrounded by palms 
and potted plants. The patronesses were Mrs. J. 
E Ostrander, Mrs. G. N. Holcomb, Mrs. S. F. 
Howard, Mrs. G. E. Stone and Mrs. F. A. Waugh. 
The committee in charge was W. O. Taft, chairman, 
Prof P B. Hasbrouck, Dr. R. S. Lull, G. T. 
French, E. F. Gaskill, L. A. Mosely, E. P. Mudge, 
S. S. Rogers, H. A. Suhlke, Benjamin Strain, W. 

C. Tannatt. 

The Derrick orchestra of Westfield furnished 
music, and Brown catered. The programs were 
quite artistic. They were of soft brown leather with 
"M '06" stamped on the outside. On the inside 
was a frontispiece of a girl's head. Then there was 
the order of dances on the third and fourth pages and 
the list of patronesses and the names of the commit- 
tee on the last pages. Among those who attended 
were : Alumni and visitors, W. E. Tottingham, 1903 
of Geneva, N. Y., and Miss Farrar of Amherst; G. 
D Jones, 1903, of Amherst and Miss Cowles of 
\mherst- A. V. Osmun. 1903, of Amherst and 
Miss Latimer of Simsbury, Ct. ; Harvey Fulton, 



1904, of Amherst and Miss Smith of Amherst ; H. 
A. Ballou, '95, of Barbados, W. I., and Miss Dick- 
inson of Hadley; E. K. Atkins, 1900, and Mrs. 
Atkins of Northampton; N. F. Monahan, 1903. and 
Mrs. Monahan of Amherst ; R. H. Gaskill of Hope- 
dale and Miss Bartlett of Amherst ; Dr. Carlson of 
Dorchester and Miss Goodnow of Amherst ; Earl 
Atkinson of Amherst and Miss Atkinson of West- 
field ; G. W. Searle, ex- 1907, and Miss Knowles of 
Westfield. 



D*p&rtm*ivf (Sloths. 



AGRICULTURE. 
Great satisfaction is felt in this department and by 
all those interested in the yield of the various farm 
crops for the year. The hay crop was especially 
abundant this year and the yield of rowen was indeed 
remarkable, a ton and a half to the acre being a good 
record. For the storage of the hay, ten barns are 
brought into requisition during the construction of the 
new one. Of these, some belong to the Experiment 
Station but many are hired. The corn crop is abund- 
ant and of good quality. At present writing it Is 
being harvested, a machine harvester being used for 
that purpose. For disposition of this crop, two tem- 
porary wooden silos are made use of until the com- 
pletion of the two excellent cement ones in the new 
barn makes it possible to store the ensilage in perma- 
nent quarters. 

Experimental work on the potato crop this last 
summer deserves special commendation. A quin- 
duplicate experiment in the use of potash, and Its 
relation to the potato blight is conclusive. In all five 
experiments, all the vines were sprayed in the usuai 
manner, those vines which were not fertilized with 
potash falling victim to the blight, while those which 
were so fertilized without exception are immune from 
the disease, and remain green and healthy at the 
present time. The conclusiveness of the duplicate 
experiments makes them very satisfactory. 

Work upon the new barn is progressing favorably, 
though not as rapidly as might be desired. The 
cement wall between the storage barn and the stock 
sheds is practically complete, and the cement work 
on the silos is also nearly done. After the comple- 



tion of the cement walk, work will show a more appar- 
ent progress. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY AND BOTANY. 

Work on the new Botanical building, Clark hall, is 
in favorable progress, and though some difficulty is 
experienced in getting help, promises to be done at 
the date assigned. The good points In the construc- 
tion of the building are evident even at this stage of 
development. 

Dr. Stone delivered a course of lectures on Plant 
Pathology at the university of Illinois during the 
summer weeks. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Many improvements have been made in and around 
Wilder hall in the past few months. The part of 
the cross walk lying on "The Hill" has bsen recon- 
structed, and though it is rather rough at present, will 
soon be in good condition. A branch walk leading to 
the rear of the Horticultural building is entirely new. 
A cement walk on the front side of the building is also 
a great addition. The lawns around the building are 
being put in good shape as fast as th* other activities 

permit. 

The furnishings of Wilder hall have been enriched 
by many additions, most notable of which are the 
show-cases in the museum. They are so constructed 
as to set off the exhibits to the best possible advan- 
tage, and the whole makes an attractive display. 
Everything is finished in the rich dark oak finish 
which is so popular to-day. Many valuable additions 
have also been made to the apparatus and instruments 
of this department. 

An unexpectedly large fruit crop is very gratifying 
to members of this department and its friends. 
Peaches have done remarkably well, and are of such 
good quality that it is impossible to satisfy even a 
small fraction of the demand. Grapes are equally 
abundant and desirable, while apples and plums are 
also excellent in quality and numbers. Top prices 
are commanded in everything. 

The cactus- room of the lower plant house has been 
emptied of its contents, new benches put in, and in 
every way fitted for experimental work in hybridiza- 
tion of plants. This Is the beginning of systematic 
experimental work which Professor Waugh hopes to 
carry on in the interests of the Experiment Station. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



n 




DIVISION OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 
During the summer the Hatch experiment station 
barn has been slated and fences repaired and painted. 
In the chemical laboratory two new fbors have been 
laid and the hails and large taboratary room redeco- 
rated Several new pieces of apparatus have been 
added, sucn as a Haensch and Schmidt triple held 
polariscope with attachments, a Ze.ss microscope and 
a Felt comptometer. 

The division is beginning work on the effect of 
molasses on the digestibility of other feed stuffs, and 
will soon start an experiment to compare the teed.ng 
value of wheat bran and alfalfa meal. 

The regular inspection of commercial te- 
stuffs was begun August 20th and will ne completed 
about the middle of October. The feeds will be 
examined as rapidly as possible, and the results pub- 
lished in bulletin form the last of the present year 

Two small fields of alfalfa have been successfully 
grown on the area devoted to summer forage crops. 
One fleid nas grown through one w.nter success:.!,/ 
and has yielded three crops the present year. Anotner 
field, sown in the spring, has y.e.ded two cuttings and 
at the present time is in exce 

Mr J" G Cook for two years COfl this 

department has accepted a position as supermter. 
of the large farm connected with tne asylum tor the 
insane at N nploil. The position is cons.dered 

an important one. 

Mr Howard A. Parsons, a former student of M. 
A C is filling tne position of dairy inspe: 
There are now some 50 Jersey ana Guernsey covs in 
the yearly milk and butter fat tests. It is expected 
that a numoer of testa » be made for breed- 

ers of Hcste.n-Friesian cows. 

Mr F. G. Heiyar will sever his Wlth 

this division October first, to ta<e a position in the 

agricultural department of tne Mt. Hermon school at 

Northfield. Mass. Mr. Heiyar ™l 

husbandry and dairy farming. 

the large dairv herd connected with the school. Tne 

position is a responsible one. and Mr. Heiyar is to be 

congratulated in being selected to fttl it. 

CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical lecture room has been refitted with 

benches and chairs, mostly of a second hand nature. 



The room will accommodate more students than 
formerly, and the facilities for good classroom work 
are somewhat improved. 



Alumni. 



At the annual meeting of the Associate alumni he.d 
on Tuesday, June 19. the following officers were 
el-cted: President. E. A. E'.lswortn. 71, °t Hoi- 
yoke; first v.ce-presiden'. Austin Peters, '81. of 
Boston; second vice-president. C. M. Hubbard. 92. 
o' Sunderland; third vice-president. G. A. Drev. 
•97 of Greenwich; secretary, F. S. Cooiey, 83; 
treasurer. David Barry. '90; auditor, E. P. Holland 
•92- executive committee. J. B. Paige. "82. and 
w'h Caldwell. '87. of Petersboro ; member of 
athletic board. C. P. Halligan. 1903. It was voted 
that the executive committee and Dr. F. Tuckerman 
secure an oil painting of tne late H. H. Goodeh. 

75.— H. S. Carruth visited college recently to 
see Professor Brooks. 

-Si —Prof. Henry E. Cnapm. professor of biology 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. high school, has recently been 
-lected president of the Brooklyn Botanical society. 
Professor Cnaoin entered M. A. C. with tne dasi of 
•82 but with exceptional ability was able to graduate 
with tne class of '81. After graduation, he too* up 
post-gradua- O * J<*° Ho P <ms un,Ver " 

sitv. entering in a tew years upon a most successful 
career as a teacher. He is no*/ considering giving 
up his teacning. and devoting his entire time to the 
ety of whicn he is president. Tne Brooklyn 
Botanical society has at its disposition some five 
million dollars, and Mr. Cnapin's work promises to 
be of the creative type which so suits men of his 

stamp a *. v • 

'83 — D. O. Nourse. since 1888 professor of agri- 
culture, and head ::' I urai department at 
the Virginia P. *■*»». has severed his 
connection p.. and has returned to 
Massachusetts where ne will probably engage in pri- 
vate business. Mr. Nourse has been very successful 
in his work. A new barn and dairy building were 
constructed under his supervision, the farm greatly 
imoroved. and most excel.er.: roads constructed. 
Both pressor and Mrs. Nourse had a very warm 



place in the hearts of the students, and their home 
served as a rendezvous for many of the boys. The 
student body presented Professor Nourse witn a beau- 
tiful loving cup on his retirement. Our college is to 
be congratulated on numbering Mr. Nourse among 

its alumni. 

•83. C. H. Preston one of the trustees of the 

college is a very busy man. Besides carrying on a 
vegetable and dairy farm, he is vice-president of the 
Danvers savings bank, a member of the bos 
selectmen, and of the board of assessors. Mr. 
Preston served several terms In the state legislature, 
was a member of the Ways- and -Means committee, 
and was very helpful in securing substantial aid for 

the college. 

'83.— S. M. Holmanis the republican candidate 
representative in his native town. The Attleboro 

Sun in an editorial on the political situation, has tne 
.wing to say regarding Mr. Hoiman : "He was a 
member of the school board for three years, a mem- 
ber of the sewerage commission, a member of the 
original grade- crossing at committee a- 

member of other important committees for the town. 
His work as tax collector has stamped him as a first- 
class official. His efforts in that department for the 
past nine years have brought it to »ne front as one of 
most efficient in the state and his vork hai 
bren recognized by the voters who have given him for 
the past three years the highest vote ever accorded a 
town official in Attlebc 

•94. _A. H. Kirkland. the official head of the gypsy 
moth exterminators, has made a survey of the work 
being done to kill off this pest. Apparently tne situa- 
rrtrol and the ravages of the insects 
toon cease, if they are not entirely eradicated. 
'98. Samuel Wiley, an Amherst boy and grad- 
uate of M. A. C. in the class of 1898, wno has been 
for the ears in charge of the laboratory of 

tne American agricuiturai chemical company at Bal- 
timore, Mc pen on Oct. 15 an office as 

:hem!st at Baltimore, in company with W. E. 
Hoffman of that city. 

'00.— A. W. Morrill. Box 165, Orlando, Fla. 
•01. — a. C. Wilson has recently opened an 
m the Hotel St. Francis. San Francisco, Cal., under 
the name of Heller & Wilson, Consulting Engineers. 



MUSIC AT MT. TOM CAFE 

EVERY SUNDAY DURING DINNER. 

September and October arc the two most 

tU -li^hti'iil months ol' the year 
on the mountain. 




CapsandGoicns 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 

Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns ami Hoods. 



COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave . Nkw Y<>kk. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

Al.«" 

Dying. Clca n ing . P a nd Repa iritig. 



All or'lern prompt')' »tteno«vl to 
Drop «M a postal ttn.l I wlli c»ll M you 
■Kull I»re*« Suit-' to rent #*--tn.lent«. Uoth* bniiKht. 



7 Heasant Street, Amhkk-t, MAM. 

i, n Tetnmui 



AKIHCK E. Dokb 



ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

fftlMltflT DIALERS AUD JOBBERS I!« 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, ANO VEAL 



Corn* r North and I'nionSts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



V v 




12 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'02.— Frederic H. Plumb and Miss C. E. Dodge 
were united in marriage on Monday, Sept. 17, at 
Norwalk, Conn. 

'05.- "Chicko" Lewis is at present inspector for 
the gypsy moth commission. 

'05. -J. R- Kelton is an instructor in the Michi- 
gan agricultural college. 

'06. H. A. Suhlke has received a position as 
assistant chemist with the Peninsular Sugar Refining 
Co. of Detroit in their large factory located at Cairo. 
Ex .'06 —The following is from the Springfield 
Republican of Sept. 15: "Alton S. Hayward will leave 
Monday to take charge of the French and German 
departments at a preparatory school for boys at 
Bridgeton, N.J. This school prepares boys espec- 
ially for Princeton and Purdue universities. Mr. 
Hayward is a graduate of the Amherst high school 
and Amherst college, 1906. He also attended the 
Massachusetts agricultural college, and while at the 
latter college acted as tutor in French and German." 



THI5CO-OP 

FOR STRAW HATS 
AND CAPS. .-. ••• ••• 



THE CO-OP. 



COLLEGE CATERING 



A SPECIALTY. 



|rvt*rcolW£i&"te. 



BOYDEIVS, 



177 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON. 



TELEPHONE 33-2. 



At a recent meeting of the Senior class at Willis- 
ton it was voted unanimously that, so far as their 
influence could prevent, ihere should be no hazing of 
any sort during the year. A vigilance committtee of 
five was appointed to co-operate with the faculty in 
suppressing all attempts to revive this barbarous 
custom. — Ex. 

Fifty Vincennes (Ind.) university students, many 
of them young women, visited the lodgings of the 
members of the faculty late Sunday night, forced 
them to dress and to accompany them to the chapel. 
The crowd called themselves the "faculty guards" 
and lined up every member of the faculty except 
President Ellis, who happened not to be at home. 
When the professors had been sent to the platform, 
one of the girl students explained that the students 
wanted promises that poor lessons would be excused 
on days following entertainments and that more holi- 
days would be allowed. The members of the faculty 
promised due consideration of the demands, and 
after some speaking by the students and a parting 
word of warning to the faculty they were permitted to 

go- 



NOTICE. 

All 15c. brands of Cigarettes 
2 for 25c. at 

henry adams & 00 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 10. 1906 



NO. 2 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

notify the Business Manager. . _ — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 

RALPH JEROME WATTS. 1907, Business Manager. 

HERBERT LINWOOD WHITE. 1908. Assistant Business Manager. 
ARTHUR WILLIAM H.OG.NS. 1907. Ah,mni Notes. EARLE ™™%%™*£' ^j' 

JOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. .907. College Notes. EDWIN DANI ELS PHIL BRCK, .908. 

DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. .908. Department Notes. ALLAN D ANA FAR R AR. PKH . 

CEORCE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR.. 1909. ORWELL BURLTON BRIGGS. 1909. 



'T. nM ,ti.OQ M rM.rl..d M »«». SUK.I* Copt-, IOC Pofg« "» '"« •* ""*•* Sut - «d Cnede , Me. .«tr. 



Y. M. C A. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Readir.g-Room Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 
C. H. WhHe. Pres. Athletic Association. 

M. H. Clark. Jr.. Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index. 

J.N. Summers. Sec. Fraternity Conference, 

Basket-ball Association. H. T. Pierce, Manager. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry, Manager. 
K. E. Gtllett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 



Entered as second-dass matter. Poet Office at Amherst. 
MMbSJM * »%»\»%»%V IWMMi 



Edi-tb rials. 



One of the most charming features arising from 
President Butterfield's administration is the interest- 
ing talk each morning at chapel. Although this sys- 
tem is by no means new, it is quite unprecedented 
here. It was this hum -drum monotony existing under 
the old conditions which led to the general disinterest 
in the chapel exercises. Nowadays we see no books 
open during the devotional exercises for all are inter- 
ested in what the president is to do and say. In this 
connection we cannot endorse too highly Mr. Butter- 
field's obvious intention of keeping in close contact 
with the students. During the past we have had far 
too many examples of gentlemen upon the faculty 
whose only interests lay in their homes down town. 
From this condition of affairs arose all the talk of the 
"lack of co-operation" and "team-work." This 
peculiar situation and the blunders arising therefrom 
also led to some of those amusing incidents which 
filled the members of the legislature last year with 



glee and caused the Springfield Republican to hope 
"that under the new president things would be differ- 
ent." Well, that they are different is plainly evident 
and friends of the college may rejoice thereat. That 
the passing of time will lead to much better results Is 
to be expected. All that is needed is the confidence 
and co-operation of the student body and alumni. 

A Springfield paper distinguished alike for the 
purity of its diction and its able comments upon the 
trend of public affairs remarks editorially in connec- 
tion with the opening of Amherst and Williams col- 
leges . «<it is no doubt true that both institutions now 

have as large an attendance as they care for. The 
entering figures are never maintained for the four 
years, and it is to be expected that the weeding-out 
process will be made sharper than ever. This will be 
called for in self-defense. The authorities of both 
institutions entertain the ambition of being first-class 
fresh-water colleges, and have no longing to take on 
university dimensions." This sentiment Is not 
entirely foreign to some of us connected with M. A. 






»4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*5 



C. Certain members of the faculty have already 
given expression of It in words almost identical to 
those used by the Republican. While it is entirely 
proper for sectarian colleges or those supported by 
private funds to advance such a policy it does not 
seem in keeping with Mass'chusetts principles. The 
state furnishes us with such a considerable amount of 
money that every citizen should have a show at get- 
ting an education. Unfortunately our classes do not 
seem to Increase as rapidly as it was supposed that 
they would after '08 rolled in on us. In view of these 
circumstances any weeding-out process as has been 
proposed seems decidedly out of place here. While 
a certain standard of scholarship is of course neces- 
sary no insurmountable obstacles should be put in the 
way of the student of average ability. And the 
weeding-out process should not be made an excuse 
for the establishment of stiff courses whose connection 
with agriculture and the allied sciences is more 
Imaginary than real. 



one would ever think of paying any attention to sug- 
gestions from the college paper but nevertheless a 
common respect for the welfare of the students living 
beside this pool of corruption demands that once more 
we call attention to the matter. It would be better to 
allow the original brook to wend its quiet way to the 
gTeat river over yonder than to tolerate the present 
conditions indefinitely for they are disgusting and 
awful. 



During the last few days the college pond has 
given more offense than ever owing to its unsightly 
appearance and the malodorous exhalation from its 
turbid waters. While the real cause of the trouble 
may only be the harmless anabaena still the effects 
are so disagreeable as to make a journey along the 
botanic walk anything but a pleasure. The pond has 
never been much of an addition to the college land- 
scape on account of the stagnancy of its water. In 
addition to the troubles outlined above the upper part 
of the "lake" has nearly filled up with a mud delta 
from the brook and desultory tufts of weeds and grass 
appear here and there above the placid stillness of the 
surface. However harmless this condition of affairs 
may be declared, common sense and a little scientific 
reasoning seem to indicate a positive menace. Any- 
one who Investigates the watershed of the brook 
which flows Into the pond finds it leading through the 
back yards of the poorer quarter of the town. Every 
rain washes the sewage and surface drainage of the 
northern section of the village down into the brook 
whence it is swept slowly along into the pond, there to 
rest In quiescent rottenness until some all-powerful 
dictate shall persuade the authorities to draw off the 
water and clean out the bottom. We do not expect 
to see any benefits resulting from this editorial for no 



It sometimes seems as if many of the students 
here pay altogether too little attention to their future 
prospects and welfare while spending four years at the 
college. We have already alluded in a former edi- 
torial to the lack of foresight displayed by many in 
selecting their junior electives and we now feel that a 
few words upon this matter of a kindred nature are not 
out of place. It is a lamentable fact that while the 
majority of the freshmen enter college filled with 
enthusiasm for some special line of work, they soon 
are tied down by the grinding monotony of the "math- 
ematical shuffle" of the first two years. Any all 
absorbing interest in other subjects is apt to be sub 
ordinated to a desperate effort to "get through." An 
inquiry into the value of the freshman and sophomore 
courses of study is, however, out of place here. We 
are inclined to believe that most M. A. C. students 
have a tendency to loaf more than is conducive to 
their own welfare but unfortunately this is a charac- 
teristic restricted to no college nor walk of life in 
particular. It is so pleasant to sit in the shade of the 
elms near South college on the warm, pleasant days 
of spring and fall or to loll on the reading-room 
benches during the inclement days of winter that 
almost everyone is tempted to extend these hours of 
recreation longer than is necessary. A desire to slide 
along day by day with many resolutions to do more 
painstaking work as soon as we have time postpones 
action until the opportunity has forever passed. It 
would be well indeed for the members of the two 
lower classes, during the time when they are taking 
the required course, to plan out to a certain extent 
exactly what they mean to do after graduating and so 
arrange their elective work as to best prepare them 
for the days to come. And this arrangement of 
electives should lead to individual research and per- 
sonal investigation of such a nature that when a man 



graduates he shall be, not only skilled theoretically in 
his line of work, but practically as 'veil. We thor- 
oughly believe that an excellent opportunity is pre- 
sented for such study here and that our instructors 
are perfectly willing to assist those whose ambitions 
rise so high. Moreover, to substantiate our position, 
we could point out individual cases where recent grad- 
uates by following this plan have obtained lucrative 
and responsible positions immediately upon gradua- 
tion. The farther we get away from the class 
system and the closer we approach individual work, 
just so much nearer do we come to the true ideal of 
a scientific education. But so long as a student who 
remains behind to ask questions of the professor is 
accused by his classmates of "working the prof, for a 
pull," we shall not make any very remarkable progress 
in the right direction. And It is likewise high time 
for some of us to "get busy." 



NEW CLASS ELECTIONS. 

1907. 
President, Fred C. Peters; vice-president, Mil- 
ford H. Clark, Jr. ; secretary, George H. Chapman; 
treasurer, John N. Summers; class- captain, 
Frederick A. Cutter ; sergeant-at-arms, Archie A. 
Hartford; historian, Clinton King. 

1908. 
President, Leroy A. Shattuck ; vice-president, 
Frank E. Thurston ; secretary and treasurer, Hermon 
T. Wheeler; class-captain, Thomas H. Jones; 
sergeant-at-arms, Carlton C. Gowdy ; historian, 
Danforth P. Miller. 

1909. 
President, Charles H. White ; vice-president, 
Lamert S. Corbett ; secretary, George M. Brown, 
Jr. ; treasurer, Robert D. Lull ; class captain, 
SamuelS. Crossman ; sergeant-at-arms, Harold D. 
Crosby ; historian, Donald J. Caffrey. 

1910. 
President, Sumner C. Brooks; vice-president, H. 
R. Chase; secretary and treasurer, Francis S. 
Beeman ; class captain, R. L. Schermerhorn j 
sergeant-at-arms, M. S. Hastings ; historian, Marjorie 
W. Lambert. 



Athletic No-Us ! 

THE NEW FOOTBALL. 

It is safe to say that, at the present time, Ameri- 
can football as a game is in a precarious condition. 
New rules have been devised by the experts to meet 
the demands of a more open, safer and more interest- 
ing game which have been made by the public, led by 
a few prominent educators. That the ends sought 
have not been entirely reached is already evident but 
no one is willing to say much concerning the future of 
football. It appears as if the leading coaches have 
reserved their pet ideas and trick plays until the big 
games of the last of the season. The uncertainty 
resulting from the revised rules is evident in the first 
two games played by our team. In the Holy Cross 
game the old style of football was plainly evident 
while at Williamstown neither team benefited much 
by using the old tactics. At the latter game the for- 
ward pass rule, which some coaches have character- 
ized as too dangerous, allowed a spectacular touch- 
down for our opponents. It is also manifest that if 
ten yards are to be made in three downs entirely new 
plays must be invented and with the assistance of the 
forward pass and the onside kick this line of work is 
being followed out. And now several football author- 
ities have testified before a coroner in Lawrenceville, 
N. J., that the death of the high school football cap- 
tain at that place was directly due to the new rules 
which they say are more dangerous than the old. 
If this view is correct, and a few more games will 
establish or disprove the fact, we shall soon hear a 
more emphatic "kick" and one which will lead no 
doubt to even greater changes next year. 

Holy Cross, 6; M. A. C, 4. 
In the first game of the season the team was 
defeated by Holy Cross at Worcester, the score being 
6 to 4. The effect of early season was evident In 
the playing of both teams. During the first half our 
men though lighter than their opponents made up In 
speed and stood up well against the Holy Cross people. 
Even after the latter had scored in the first of the 
second half the struggle was as strong as ever. The 
scoring came about in this way. After a minutes 
play in the second half, Holy Cross was forced to 
punt. Scanlan got the ball away for 40 yards and 






V* 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*7 




0^,1, getting under I ran « **«« . «■£! <*£ «- *"£ ShlXSj* 

down Scanlan then kicked the goal. Our earn P™' n S beglnni „g and sent the ball to 

cTed m the 1.3. o, the hal. when Ho* ^H^^^S goal. Cobo punted 
tort wtth an attempt a. a (air ca uh. They we e « «*«. J ^ ^ and an exchang e o 

penalised and the ball was landed about the Hoi Hack ;« ^ ta|f ^ Mme style „ 

Cross 25-yard line. M. A. C. having ,e choice ^ pun s f w i — fc ^ m , 

scrimmage or a try for a goal from the field took the play """ Wes , punts gave M . A. 

SHd Cobb booted .he ball overthebar. Neither V *X „< -he bal, on Williams^ 30-yard line 
m made extensive use of trick plays or en J^F*— , ||ed for , goal lro m the field. I. failed 
and M. A. C. relied mainly on straight fu bac «*~ back ^ ^ mi „ dle of lta IW d. 

plunges through the center. Sexton and Anderson and ^ 

nlaved well for Massachusetts, breaking through the The up u « s «„u SE r,s. 

C repeatedly and smothering «**£• *MJ-» «—• 
was called with our men In possession of the ball on 



their own 10-yard line. The line-up : 



HOLY CROSS. 

Smith. L e. 
McCrohan, I. t. 
McCarthy. L g. 
Cahill. c. 
PaUottl, r. g. 
Lynch, r. t. 
O'Donnell. r. e. 
Connor (capt.). q- D - 
Hetherman. L h. b. 
Hammel. r. h. b. 



h. b. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. c. Bartlett 
r. t.. Sexton 
r. g.. Cutter (capt.) 
c. Paige 
I, g., Anderson 
1. t.. Farley 
1. e.. Barry. Warner 
q. b.. Cobb 
Schermerhorn. Crosby 
1 



Lament. 1. t. 

Morse. L g. 

Harter. c. 

Cutterson. r. g. 

WestbrooW, r. t. 

Chapman, r. e. 

Waters, q. b. 

D. Brown. 1. h. b. 

C. Brcwn. r. h. b. 

Clay. f. b. 

Score— Williams 5 



r. t.. Sexton 
r. g.. Cutter. Crosby 
c. Paige, Cutter 
1. g.. Anderson 
1. t.. Farley 
1. e.. Barry. Warner 
q. b.. Cobb 
r. h. b.. Watkins 
1. h. b.. Chapman 
f. b.. Willis 
Touchdown— Chapman. Referee 



,. b., Chapman bard, 
f. b.. Willis 
Touchdown— O' Don 



Scanlon, f. b. 

.f o7.r.L C Tuc 6 Kdo M .^an,n; Goal 
SL Unrpir^. «. Donne,,, o, Ban™ ■ ^ 
E H Davis cf Wesleyan. Linesmen-Rice of Mo.y ^ 
GiUett of M. A. C. Time-two 15-minute halves. 
Williams 5; M. A. C, 0. 



Eas,n,.n. Un^-M.rcer t«— ^* «- H* 
Time _l5-mirute halves. 



M A C.,0; New Hampshire, 0. 
On a wet and s'lippery field M. A. C. tied the first 
home game, Oct.6, with New Hampshire state col- 
lege the score being 0-0. Had better weather con- 
ditions prevailed, the game would probably have been 
mor e ^resting. The new rules as exem^ ed J, 



Williams 5; M. A. w., «• ,...w.y.. -- ~ The ball was 

Massachusetts was defeated Oct. 3 by Williams ^^^^S - New Hampshire 
at Williamstown, the score being 5 to 0. The. e ^ ^ ^ once> on a run b y 

rule which permits the passing of the £1 lon«ri| was Massachusetts made contmual 

was taken advantage of *™^2l™Z gans around the ends and through the line The 



Ind resulted in a brilliant touchdown in which Waters 
and Chapman figured. After one unsuccessful 
attempt to gain, Waters started as if to skirt the en 



fame started by Massachusetts kicking to Walte. 
New Hampshire was then forced after two downs to 

. .. ...j. Cobb then made 



was forced to punt, Massachusetts getting the ball on 
New Hampshire's 40-yard line. Crosby made nine 
yards around the end, and Schermerhorn five through 
tackle. Cobb was tackled for a loss of 10 yards, and 
New Hampshire got the ball on its 15-yard line. 
Ingram then made 10 yards past tackle, this being 
the only time New Hampshire made its distance. 
Bartlett tackled the quarterback for a loss of 10 yards. 
New Hampshire then kicked to the center of the field 
as the half ended. Both teams worked hard for a 
touchdown in the second period, but could not get 
the ball over. The line-up : — 



attempt to gain, Waters started as it to sun ine « . ^ lg yafds 

wh en he suddenly stopped and tot iging, passe the bunt^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



ball over our men's heads to Chapman. The latter 
eluded Cobb, his only opponent and scored the touch- 
down Williams used the same play several times, 
gaining but not securing another touchdown Little 
gain was made by the old style of play and the game 
oecame largely a kicking contest. Our team failed 
to make the required distance by either line plays or 
tackle-end plays to which they resorted mostly. 



seven yards on an end play. After two downs Mass- 
achusetts was forced to punt. The ball went on downs 
to Massachusetts. Chapman then made 12 yards 
and Schermerhorn 10. Massachusetts was penalized 
15 yards for hurdling. Crosby followed with an 18- 
yard gain through tackle. New Hampshire secured 
fhe ball on a poor pass to Cobb for a kick. New 

J Hampshire was penalized 15 yards for hurdling, and 



College N°**S- 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Chapman. I. e. 
Farley, 1. 1. 
Summers. 1. g. 
Capt. Cutter, c. 
Anderson, r. g. 
Sexton, r. t. 
Bartlett. r. e. 
Cobb. q. b 
Crosby. 1. h. b. 
Schermerhorn. r. h. b 
Willis, f. b. 
Score — Massachusetts 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

r. e . Sandburn 

r. t., Capt. Ingram 

r. g.. Hughes 

c. Chase 

1. g.. O'Connor. McGrale 

1. 1., Hammond 

1. e.. Bachelder 

q. b.. Ryan 

r. h. b.. Cone 

1. h. b.. Wilkins. Swan 

f. b.. Waite 

New Hampshire 0. Referee— 



Keady of Dartmouth. Umpire— Collins of Northampton. 
Head linesmen— Ladd of Massachusetts. Barry of Massa- 
chusetts. Reed of New Hampshire. Time— 15 and 20 min- 
ute halves. 



THE STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 

At a recent meeting of the Stockbridge Club new 
officers were chosen and the routine business of a new 
| year transacted. The following officers were elected : 
[President, Jasper F. Eastman; vice-president, 
Samuel J. Wright; secretary and treasurer, John 
Daniel. The executive committee consists of the 
president, *xo///c/o, and O. L. Clark, R. H. Verbeck, 
and A. L. Whiting together with Professors Brooks and 
faugh. Plans were discussed for the coming year 
ind a more systematic line of work will be attempted 
f han heretofore. In an interview, the president spoke 
as follows concerning the object and aims of the club. 
"The club is composed of fellows especially inter- 
ested in agriculture, horticulture and floriculture. 
The aim is to do partnership investigation and work 
jilong these lines. Meetings are held once a week 
ind some topic is discussed. Quite often men from 
putside address the club. At other times one of the 
nembers looks up some subject in which he is 
specially interested and gives a short talk at the con- 
tusion of which the matter is fully discussed." 



The formal inauguration of President Butterfield 

will take place on Oct. 17. 

—J. T. Caruthers, '07, spent the early part of 
September In Canada, making an especial study of 
Canadian livestock. 

—We are sorry to learn that A. W. Higgins, '07, 
is suffering from an attack of the mumps. Here's 
hoping for his speedy recovery. 

At a recent meeting of the senior class, Wayland 

F. Chace was elected to the senate, filling the vacancy 
created by the leaving of H. T. Pierce. 

At a recent class meeting of 1910 the matter of 

purchasing a 1907 Index was presented and several 
freshmen took advantage of the opportunity to secure 
this interesting college annual. 

Among those whom we were glad to welcome 

back for a few days in Amherst were E. B. Snell, 
•03, W. A. Munson, '05, A. T. Hastings, C. E. 
Hood, andC. A. Tirrell, '06. 

—On Monday, Oct. 1st, the two first companies 
made their appearance under arms. The new 
rifles are a great Improvement over the old Spring- 
fields, and much better target scores are expected. 

The freshman class colors are to be maroon and 

black. Chase has been elected captain of the '10 
football team and Hazen is the manager. The class 
yell is "one, nine, t-e-n, Massachusetts, nineteen- 

ten." 

A valuable addition has been made to the college 

library in the International Encyclopedia. This book 
avoids the diffuseness of larger works and Is, at the 
same time, very modern. Its value as a reference 
book is great. 

The first regular meeting of the Y. M. C. A. 

was held In the rooms last Thursday evening and was 
well attended. The meeting was led by President 
Butterfield and all those who were present obtained 
some good practical pointers toward right living. 

Most of the officers of the battalion have secured 

regulation U. S. army sabers from the Ames Sword 
company of Chicopee Falls. It seems as if these 
should have been furnished the college by the govern- 
ment since we are supplied with other equipments from 
that source. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



«9 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




SIGNAL COMPETITION. 
" -The College Senate has elected the following representative of the Signal 

officers: President, F. C Peters; ^^^]^^ zt J Y .t,.C.^ n ^ m ^^ ^ I 
W F. Chace; secretary and treasurer, T A Barry, whc »P , lhe election of new mem- 

Regular monthly meetings will be held the first Mo. «^ ~ l ~ ^ J ard . The y were especially I 
day of each month when those having business with ^oMh^ ^ ^ ^^ the endless criticism of 

the board can transact it. J.^raft" and "log-rolling" which has been made con 

_ A tarecent mass meeting held in the ^\^\^^„ L iMX oX^^^ M^. His I 
,he interest of football a $3.50 tax was voted an It* "^ ^ x now the ult imate choice rests 

greater part of it paid within 24 hours. A short q nte ^ ^ ^ dogs ,„ the of 

alk was given by the coach and the manager ^Ciectton..ndtherecanbe«» charges laid up 

his policy. ^^^^TTZlZ^K^ senior members of the board as 
the outlook is bright both financially and otherw.se. aga 

_The Fraternity Conference held its first meeting* • ^ ^ constitution bating to elections Is 

on Sept. 27 and the following officers were elected : | ^ ^ .__ 

Ill MEMBERSHIP. 

| Any male student of the college taking the 
Lour" years course may become eligible to the board 



President F. C. Peters ; vice-president, J. 0. Chap 
nT secretary and treasurer, W. F. Chace , cha.r 
man' of the informal committee, J. A. Hysiop. A 
committee was also appointed to draw up rules for 
" rushing" freshmen 



, before the annual election (as here-in-after described 
_ About twenty-eight M. A. C. men have engage ^^ ^ ^^ as tQ clear , y ind ,cate the 

sittings at the First Congregational church. Thl ^ the candida te to command the English 

aangement Is very satisfactory to all concerned an abU. The nature of these articles is left to the 

an idea which which the other churches wou d do , j W ^ ^ ^ compete . „ there a re not a 
to follow. It seems to fill the blank which the lack ^^ q{ ^^ candidates r e CO mmenda 

of Sunday chapel service creates in the rehgiou. » d from ^ EngUsh dep artmen 



atmosphere of the college. 

-Those who attended the interesting forestry lec- 
tures last year at the college, will be sorry to learn that 
th I State Forester, Mr. Akerman, and his assistant^ 

Mr.Hawley, have both resigned. Prof F«"^»~ except tne aeniuI _, - 
of the New Hampshire college has been engaged to ^.^ ^ ^ board from that class 

'• therefore have charge , h u wUhin one week 



Zm may be accepted from the English departmen, 
of the college. A person having once qualified shal 
remain so as long as he is in college 

2 On the first Monday of March, the editor-in 
chief shall supply the president of each college class 
except the Senior class, with a list of the men el.g. 



The 



succeed Mr. Akerman and will 

of the college lecture course in forestry. 

__The other afternoon the Botany division of the 

senl0 r class made a very interesting and instructive 

trip to Haydenvilie under the direct.on of Dr. Stone. 
The orchard of Mr. Miller was inspected and thanks 
to him many helpful points were brought out. 
This orchard is in fine condition, 1600 healthy Bad- 
win apple trees, and a fine crop of fruit was being 
gathered. 



Among the students who have entered the Indo- 
Iranlan department at Columbia this year are two 
Buddhist priests from japan, and a Zoroastrian priest 
from India. 



president of each class shall within one week cal « 
meeting of his class and at that meeting the class 
shall elect by plurality vote those who shall represen 
the class on the editorial board. At this election tw 
men shall be elected from the freshman class, tw: 
from the sophomore class and one from the junio- 
class In each case a man elected shall hold h* 
position as long as he is a member of the class whic. 

elected him, but only so long as that class is entitle. 

to representation on the board. 

3 Elections to fill vacancies, except the annu. 

elections, shall be made within ten days after tb 

editor-in-chief notifies the president of the clas. 

aHeded of the vacancy and in the manner describe. 

in the foregoing article. 



Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION. 

The reception given to the members of the enter- 
ing-class by the Y. M. C. A. occurred in the chapel 
on Friday evening, Sept. 28. The student -body was 
well represented and an unusually large number of the 
faculty were present. After the formalities of receiv- 
ing the new men were over, Mr. J. R. Parker, '08, as 
master of ceremonies introduced several speakers 
representing the different banches of student and col- 
lege activity. President White of the Y. M. C. A. 
welcomed the new class to the college and assured 
them that their assistance ant presence is requisite if 
the association is to do the greatest good during the 
coming year. F. C. Peters, president of the senate 
and a prominent athlete, spoke briefly but enthusiasti- 
cally on the prospects of athletics. Earle G. Bart- 
lett, representing the M. A. C. musical association, 
followed. After explaining this new organization be 
urged the freshmen who posess any abilities in this 
line to mane it known at once. He truthfully 
declared that unless each class starts in at once to do 
its share in such work any organized effort must 
dwindle and fail. Ralph J. Watts, business man- 
ager of the Signal, explained in a few words the 
policy and future aims of the paper. He appealed 
to the student-body for their support both in subscrib- 
ing for and contributing to the Signal. It was fitting 
that the last speaker of the evening should be President 
K. L. Butterfield. Mr. Butterfield moralized upon 
a college career and urged the new s'udents to 
interest t lemselves In the Y. M. C. A. He 
expressed a desire to see that organization the most 
prominent one in college, but not In any way antago- 
nistic to atoletic or other interests. This completed 
the regular program and was followed by light 
refreshments. The undergraduates present then 
gathered about the organ and sang "Massachusetts" 
and other college songs. The different yells were 
practiced and every effort made to inculcate a loyal 
college spirit in the 1910 men present. About 10-15, 
after an informal intercourse between faculty, students 
and others present, the most enjoyable Y. M. C. A. 
reception in recent years ended. 



THE ROPE PULL. 

The annual rope pull between the two lower classes 
took place on the campus Friday Oct. 5, at I 15 p. 
m. Coming as it did so early in the day there were 
not many outsiders present and President Butterfield 
was about the only representative of the faculty on 
hand, except Mr. Blake, '04, who acted as referee. 
Before the event transpired the juniors caused con- 
siderable merriment by appearing in outlandish 
customs, plug hats and canes. But it is evident that 
the supply of "high hats" is unequal to the demands 
of a large junior class. Beside the festivities of junior 
day there was a fantastic figure wandering about the 
campus with a bottle of infantile refreshment and this 
was an additional source of amusement. At the 
appointed time the teams gathered In the enclosure 
and the captains tossed up for position. The fresh- 
men won and chose the north end. The pull was 
supposed to last two minutes but owing to some mis- 
stake In timing it was called when only one minute 
and a few seconds had elapsed. The 1909 men "got 
the drop" and pulled the rope steadily away from their 
opponents. If the entire time had been allowed the 
rope would probably have been entirely hauled away 
from 1910 ; as It was the sophomores won by a margin 
estimated at about eighteen feet. After the tug-of- 
war was over the usual yells were indulged in by all 
the classes present and the sophomores paraded 
around the campus carrying the rope which was later 
cut up and distributed as souvenirs. The composi- 
tion of the teams was as follows ;- 1 909, Warner 
(captain and anchor), Willis, Crosby, Turner, Corbett 
and Bartlett ; 1910, Beeman (anchor), Smith, Brantt, 
Schermerhorn, Leonard (captain) and Curtis. Like 
most contests this one has a moral for the losers. If 
the freshmen had shown that unity of action and 
spirit which distinguishes the classes at Massachusetts 
the result might have been different. If the class 
had shown up at the practices as they had ought, 
while they might still have lost, the pull would not 
have been the fiasco that it was. Men of ' 10, wake 
up and get into things. 






With a freshman class of 130 and a total enroll- 
ment of about 470 in college, Holy Cross has made a 
considerable gain over preceeding records. 



A movement is on foot In Congregational circles to 
move Andover theological seminary to Chicago, 111. 
A special conference has been called to consider 
the matter. 




20 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



t 



COMMUNICATED. 

(The following article submitted by a student who 
prefers to remain anonymous expresses the other side 
of the subject concerning which the "Autocrat" wrote 
In the last Signal. It is well-written and we print it 

lnfull-£tf.) 

The remarks of the Autocrat in the last issue of the 
Signal seem to require more than a passing notice on 
the part of everybody who has the welfare of old 
"Mass'chusetts" at heart. 

The one feature of the American college which has 
brought greater discredit on it than all others com- 
bined has been the practice of "hazing," or as it may 
defined, the abridgment of the personal rights of a stu- 
dent by his fellows, usually upper-class men. But must 
it always be said of us that we have not the spirit of 
the "golden rule" to such an extent that we cannot 
see the injustice of "hazing" a student simply because 
he happens to be in the entering class, while we may 
have had the honor or good-fortune of having been 
through the initial stages. The "Autocrat" believes 
that the spirit which prompts hazing is a "part of 
human nature. " Rather is it not the nature of the 
beast, who demonstrates on every occassion his phys- 
ical superiority by humiliating the fellow creatures 
with whom he is associated? "Hazing" can at the 
best be only a faint improvement on this by an 
abnormal human mind,— "abnormal" because the 
true human nature regards the personal rights and 
privileges of a fellow-man as sacred. 

True the milder forms of hazing have made men of 
some fellows who have come to college with the 
"Veni, Vidi, Vici" of Caesar upon their lips. But 
can we say that this offsets the injuries to life and 
limb which have in too many cases been direct results 
of carelessness and stupidity on the part of young men 
who are supposed to know better? 

It would seem that the "Autocrat" condemns too 
harshly the action of the authorities in requiring each 
stndent to pledge to refrain from the pratice of various 
forms of barbarity which have been handed down to 
us by classes who did not live in this age of American- 
ism , when every man has a right to expect from his 
fellows as fair a deal as his efforts and ambitions 
entitle him to. An appeal to a man's honor as a 
gentleman is the strongest appeal that could be made 
to a thinking and self-sacrificing man, one who is 



willing to forget his own desires in the advancement 
of the honor of his college and to lay aside any feeling 
of superiority over his fellows, that the good name of 
the college may remain unstained by such acts as are 
entailed in "the slugging and barbarism of the campus 
rush" and kindred forms of pastimes which seem to 
have been invented by the Old Scratch himself and 
are now being developed to a state of perfection by 
scores of devoted disciples in our American colleges 

today. 

In exacting a pledge from each man the faculty 
virtually "put it up to" the student body to see to it 
that nothing in the form of hazing shall occur. 
Where better could the responsibility be placed? The 
standing of any college cannot be determined by the 
abilities of her officers alone, but by the reputation of 
her alumni and the student body, on whom the credit 
for the success or failure of the institution must of 
necessity in a large measure devolve. When "col- 
lege spirit" supplants "class spirit" and each man 
works and sacrifices something for th« good of the 
whole rather than to gain notoriety for any class or 
faction with which he may be associated, then will we 
without any hesitation, pledge ourselves upon our 
honor as gentlemen to treat our fellows as members 
of one large family, whose sole purpose it is to make 
our grand old "Mass'chusetts" a representative 
American institution, with a "square deal" for each 
and every one. 



ANOTHER POINT OF VIEW. 

The Editor of the Signal :— I submit the follow- 
ing with a vague hope that it may appear in the 

Signal. 

At the present, when athletics have reached such 
an important place in nearly all American colleges, 
one who attempts to protest against them, or the 
manner in which they are carried on, is exposed to 
the maledictions of most young people. The author 
of this article must admit that while the ideas 
expressed in the following lines may place him in the 
ranks beside President Eliot and other spectacled 
pedagogues of the land, still he feels called upon to 
comment upon certain features of athletics as they 
appear at Mass'chusetts. He does not believe that 
intercollegiate athletics as at present conducted are 
of any practical utility to the college. Their support- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



at 



ers have no grounds to substantiate such statements 
as "athletics are the best advertising that a college 
can have." We have heard this argument so much 
that it has become tiresome. No one has ever 
attempted to show by actual statistics how many 
students are really attracted to the institution by 
the prowess of our athletic teams. The writer is 
free to admit that M. A. C. was first called to his 
attention by a graduate of Amherst college. He is 
forced to believe that most of those who are attracted 
here solely by athletic glamor are those ephemeral 
beings who fina the limit of their endurance the final 
exams of the first semester of the freshman year. 
But all this is mere supposition, let some one furnish 
us with facts to show clearly and concisely whether 
or not athletics are an advertisement for M. A. C. 

It is not hard to find objections to the present sys- 
tem of intercollegiate athletics. In the first place 
they demand altogether too much time which should 
be spent elsewhere. It is undoubtedly true that 
much of the time spent on the athletic field would 
not be utilized advantageously but the prolonged 
absences of some of the teams from recitations is 
indefensible. This is especially true of the long trip 
which the baseball people take every spring to a dis- 
tant part of New England. A whole week lost at 
this time when the professors and instructors have 
begun to hurry down the home stretch of the year 
can never be made up and it is idle to say that it 
can. There are numerous specific cases which 
would illustrate this truth if .t were proper to call 
individual names in such an article as this. 

Again the athletic association has, at times, 
demanded altogether too much money for the sup- 
port of Its teams. No one would object if busi- 
ness ability was shown in the expenditure of this but 
unfortunately prudent managers have not always been 
chosen. This is a strong statement but it is backed 
by the reports published from time to time in the 
Signal. When we see extravagant sums placed 
against "stationery" and "postage" ve are forced to 
admit that there is a "queer" look about it which, 
should a disciple of John B. Moran appear, would lead 
to talk of an "investigation-" As far as expense is 
concerned the writer is compelled in a spirit of fair- 
ness to repudiate the idea expressed once by a promi- 
nent member of the faculty that the athletic associa- 



tion has no right to ask for money because it is the 
policy of the college to eliminate all unnecessary 
expense. After all, the fees called for have not except 
in exceptional cases, been large. 

Lastly a great deal of factional feeling has appeared 
in the election of the captains and managers of the 
teams. Charges of log rolling and wire-pulling have 
been made repeatedly, sometimes with apparently 
good reason. Thus college spirit which it is claimed 
is fostered by athletics has, instead, been greatly 
injured. In view of these conditions expressed hastily 
and perhaps somewhat illogically in th-j foregoing 
article and of the fact that we cannot offer special 
inducements to noted prep, school athletes to main- 
tain our high standing year after year, the writer 
believes that the present intercollegiate athletic system 
should be discontinued. But interclass contests and 
in general, all athletic events not calling for a lavish 
and undue expenditure of time and money should not 
only be continued but given more prominence than at 

present. 

Student. 



D*p&rtmtrvf f4ot*s. 



The editor of Department Notes has been disap- 
pointed in not being able to secure news of special 
importance to fill his columns this week. The various 
departments all report favorable progress the past 
fortnight, but have nothing of special interest to offer 
readers of the Signal. So the editor has taken this 
occasion to express in a few words what .lis aim and 
ambition is for that little part of the college paper 
which has been entrusted to his care. 

A technical college of the "Mass'chusetts" type 
differs in many respects from an academic institution. 
In the first place, we are proud of our democracy, 
and detest anything that smacks of aristocracy. We 
are all here on an equal footing, with one another 
and with the outside world. There is nothing of the 
"prig" in an M. A. C. man. Secondly, our field of 
work is broader, much broader, and is better equipped 
to turn out men of personal character and stamina, 
men fitted to take up a life work when they graduate . 
We are all here with a special purpose which we 
throw our best efforts into accomplishing. There is 
none of the aimlessness that mars so many of our 












22 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



23 



academic courses. And the accomplishment of that 
purpose lies in the various departments, their equip- 
ment in instructors as well as more material things, 
and their ability to aid us in our special line of work. 
The departments make up the college, and the suc- 
cess of the college can be no greater nor less than 
the success of the departments. 

We would indeed be narrow minded if we were 
interested in but one department, and cared not a 
straw for the progress of work in in other departments. 
The various departments are inter-dependent, and no 
one can completely round us out without the aid of 
others. Thus, for example, though I may be pri- 
marily interested in the Department of Agriculture, 
my education is not complete without a certain 
co ordinate interest in the Horticultural, Botanical, 
Entomological, and Experiment Station departments. 
This is met to a certain extent by required courses in 
the other departments, but the element of personal effort 
and investigation must enter to best accomplish our 
ends. So it is that the Signal devotes a couple of 
columns to call attention to what is being done of 
possible interest in the various deparmonts, that 
those who do possess that keen interest may profit by 
a timely suggestion. 

It is not the intention of the editor to give a com- 
plete account of unusual activities. This were impos- 
sible, and even if it were possible, the factor of error 
in minute particulars would be large. The aim of 
the editor is to merely give such a brief outline of 
special lines of work as will call attention to that 
work, that those who are interested may investigate 
further. The heads of the departments are always 
glad to talk over the work to which they are devoting 
their especial efforts. In fact, many a time has a 
professor complained to me that the students take 
no interest in trie work outside their own narrow 
spheres. Personally, I have always made the defense 
of lack of time, which, however, we must admit is 
a lame excuse. There is not that perfect sympathy 
between student and professor which makes ths work 
of each pleasurable and profitable. 

Can we stimulate this interest in any way ? This 
is a question which the editor meets every other 
week as he sits down to write his columns. It is not 
easy to put things in the brief, pithy, way which is 
ideal. The professors often regard the editor as an 



intruder upon their time, and turn him down with a 
few ragged notes, or nothing at all. Others give him 
a hearty welcome, invite him to be seated, and endeavor 
in every way to make his words easy and agreeable. 
If they would all bear in mind that the progress of 
their department is being watched by the student 
body, the alumni, and many interested outsiders, and 
endeavor with a little care and thought to make that 
progress intelligible through this college paper, it 
would indeed make our work enjoyable and profitable. 



Alu 



mm. 



CLASS OF 1905. 

"In order to secure a speedy class letter to all 
members of 1905, the undersigned would like to 
have each member send a letter to him at 48 Win- 
ter St., Boston as soon as possible. He will have 
copies taken of each and sent to every member. 
Postage stamps will be gratefull; received to defray 
the small expense. Try and have all letters in by 
one month from the day the Sgnal is issued. 

Chester L. Whitaker." 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO ALUMNI. 

Today the statements of your account with the 
Signal are b^ing sent out. It is hoped that you will 
be as prompt as possible ir remitting your subscrip- 
tions as we need the money to carry on the work of 
the paper. 

R. J. Watts, Business Manager. 

The alumni column 's in a serious predicament this 
week. The sudden illness of the alumni editor has 
tied up a large numbe.' of notes which, although they 
will be published in due time, are not now ready. 
Especially do we regret that a list of the 1906 men 
sent in by the class secretary is not at this time avail- 
able but we assure our readers that if possible it will 
appear with even later revisions in the next issue. 
At this emergency an interesting synopsis of the class 
of 1896 has been received from the efficient secre- 
tary of that class, A. S. Kinney of South Hadley. 
Such an interest as shown by this alumnus is certainly 
appreciated by the Signal board and, if an epigram- 
matic piece of advice is not out of place, we suggest 
to the other class secretaries: "Go thou, and do 
likewise." If you do not have the time, hunt up 



some classmate and get him to do the work. Thus 
alone can the alumni column be maintained at its 
maximum efficiency. 

'78.— W. L. Boutwell of Leverett died Friday, 
Sept. 28, at the Dickinson hospital in Northampton 
of meningitis. He was about 49 and had always 
been in excellent health until he fell from a tobacco 
shed, seven weeks ago. He was prominent in Lev- 
erett as a former school-committeeman and chairman 
of the board of assessors. 

'91. — h. M. Howard has just completed a lettuce 
house 283 by 50 feet at his place in West Newton. 
Addresses of the Class of '96 so far as known. 
H. C Burrington, superintendent Edgewood farm, 
Greenwich, Conn. 

F. L. Clapp, engineer, board of Water Supply of 
New York City, New Hamburg, N. Y. 

A. B. Cook, superintendent Hill Stead Farm, 
Farmington, Conn. 

F. E. DeLuce, with G. Putnam's Sons, 29th St., 
New York City. 

H. T. Edwards, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
227 Calle Rege Malate. Manilla, P. I. 

S. W. Fletcher, professor of Horticulture, Michi- 
gan agricultural college, Lansing, Mich. 
J. F. Hammar, farmer, Nashua, N. H. 
W. B. Harper, chemist, Lake Charles Chem- 
ical Co., Lake Charles, La. 

B. K. Jones, died Aug. 21, 1903, at Springfield. 
A. S. Kinney, class secretary, Department of 

Botany, Mount Holyoke college, South Hadley. 

A. M. Kramer, engineer, 21 Bancroft Ave.. 
Worcester. 

P. A. Leamy. principal High School, Butte, Mont. 

J. L. Marshall, class president, with Bradley Car 
Works, Worcester. 

H. W. Moore, market gardener, 19 Amherst St., 
Worcester. 

R. P. Nichols, Assinippi. 

C. A. Nutting, farm superintendent, Ashby. 
W. L. Pentecost, superintendent of Brooklands 

Farm, SttttvUle, N. Y. 

E. W. Poole, draughtsman with L. B. Davis, Box 
129, New Bedford. 



MUSIC AT IT. TOM CAFE 

EVERY SUNDAY DURING DINNER. 



September and October are the two most 

delightful months of the year 

on the mountain. 



THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 

Most Attractive Cafe in New England. 

Private Dtalag Boa— far Ladies ami Tkastrc PbtUm 

Class and Fraternity Banquets a specialty 

Try our Special Sunday Dinners, , r » i\ m. to *.'.W v m . He. 

When in town gfva uw a trial and bt convinced 

Opra until midnight. 

BDWARD A. LEWI8, Murmur. 

12-11 Suffolk St., - - Hoi.vokk, Mash. 

Telephone connection. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

Al.an 

DyiHg % CU*ntHgi Pressings and Repairing. 

All orders promptly attended lo. 

Drop me .1 p"-!al and I will call on you 

jyrull Dress Suit* to rent. •#>Htudenti, l loth* bought. 



7 Pleasant Street, Amiikkst, Mass. 



VISIT MY 

New Art Store, 

180 Main Street, 

Northampton, Mass. 

Store and Btsfinrnl devoted entirely to Picture Framing. 
We are MOASMM In this line. 

1*. R. OHE>W. 







■71 



24 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I. C. Poole, osteopathic physician, 292 Pine St., 
Fall River. 

F. H. Read, teacher, English High School, Prov- 
idence, R. I. 

H. H. Rcper, farmer, East Hubbardston. 

F. B. Shaw, unknown. 
S. Saito, unknown. 

S. Sastre, planter, Haciendi Station, Rosalia, 
Cardenas, Tobasco, Mexico. 

M. E. Seltew, principal Meadow School, East 
Hartford, Conn. 

L. J. Shepard, care of T. Buck, West Sterling. 
N. Shultis, with Mark Shultis, wholesale grain 
dealer, 601 Chamber of Commerce, Boston. 
G. Tsuda, Azabu, Tokio, Japan. 

Non-Graduates of '96. 
G. Day, Groveland. 
W. B. Dodge, unknown. 
W. J. Curley, physician, South Framiagham. 
H. G. Geary, unknown. 
G. C. Hubbard, 255 Main St., Reading. 
R. L. Hay ward, with the Prudential Life Insurance 
company, Hartford, Conn. 
E. E. Kinsman, unknown. 

S. L. Morse, with Success Publishing company, 
New York City. 

H. W. Rawson, with W. W. Rawson, market 
gardener, Arlington. 

W. D. Shurtleff, unknown. 
R. H. Vaughan, Thetford, Vt. 
T. F. Walsh. Amherst. 
F. P. Washburn, North Perry. Me. 
'98. —Willis S. Fisher is now principal of the 
Lincoln and Gooch grammar schools at Melrose. 
His address is 60 Wyoming Avenue. 

£ X .'01. C. A. Boutelle, formerly of Lenox, is 

now located as superintendent of a large stock farm 
at Cuba, N. Y. 

'04._Clarer.ce A. Griffin is studying medicine at 
Washington university, Washington, D. C. 

'05. _F. L. Yeaw is working on the peach-tree 
blight at Marysville, Cal. 



th & co-o £>. THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOE STRAW HATS 
AND CAPS. .-. ••■ ••• 



THE CO-OP. 



COLLEGE CATERING 



A SPECIALTY. 



BOYDEIM'S, 



177 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON. 



TELEPHONE 33-2. 



NOTICE. 

All 15c. brands of Cigarettes 
2 for 25c. at 

HENRY ADAMS & GO. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 24. 



1906 



NO. 3 



PubHshcd PTtnKhti, * Sterns of th. Massachusetts A B ncul.ura. Colic,. 



Thb Siohai will be 

L„, ,o .11 subscribers until Mi 11 1 I ■« « '« «*"* » nd arrelrS *" 

I v tifv the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-m-Ch,et 

RALPH JEROME WATTS 1907, Business Manager. 

JOHN ROBERT PARKER. ""• *"" ^tf BBl BARTLETT. ,907. 
I ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS. 1907. Alumn. Not" edwjn dan)ELS PH ILBRICK. 1908. 

IOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes. allan dana FARRAR . 19 08. 

DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908. Apartment Notes. ORWELL BURLTON BRIGGS. 1909. 

GEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON JR.. 1909. 



Term--. $1.00 per -.'«' -» • de » nc ' Sin3,# (#P ' M ' — 



P..U$f .."id. •« U1*M *■*•■ • 0<1 '■• n8<1 "- " C 55 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
I College Senate. 
1 Readir.g-Room Association. 

Basket-ball Association. 



C. H. White. Pres. 
M. H. Clark. Jr.. Manager, 
r. C Peters. Pre*. 
J.N. Summers. Sec. 
H. T. Pierce. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

Base Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Indea. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry. Managet. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters Pres. 
E G Bartlett. Manager 



Entered a. seosnd-cUs. matter. Po« Office at Amher*. 



Edi'tbri^ls. 



102 Main St., - 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



In these days of progress it has become almost a 
fad to recommend ' 'publicity' ' as an universal cure-all. 
Everything that is bad or wrong can be eliminated or 
changed, it is said, by this agency. Doubtless this . 
to a considerable extent true, especially in the case of 
the troubles of our own college. The evils resulting 
from the ignorance prevalent among most people con- 
cerning M. A. C. are too well known to need men- 
tioning. There seems to be only one method for 
improving these conditions. For a long time the 
Signal has urged the formation of a press club. A 
times plans have been made and all but the essentia 
details have be.n carried out ; then some Incident 
arose and the whole thing fell through. It now seems 
as if the senate, as the only remaining body, should 
attempt to engineer this scheme, for both the college 
paper and the classes working individually have been 
unable to obtain any tangible results. Were there 
regular correspondents in college for those papers 



which circulate in this vicinity many one-sided and 
unpleasant episodes would never have occurred. 
Besides this, the alumni, friends, and prospective stu- 
dents of the college would then be enabled to learn 
more of the institution without consulting the "Am- 
herst" town news in the papers. AH the colleges in 
Western Massachusetts except our own have corres- 
pondents for the Springfield papers and there seems to 
be no reason why we should not be represented as wel 
If the students desire that the Boston Transcript shall 
periodically refer to us as "cubs" and that other 
papers shall casually mention the "Amherst farmers, 
etc this present state of affairs may well be allowed 
to go on but if a more appreciative attitude is desired 
from the people of the state we must first secure the 
good-will and co-operation of the daily papers and to 
do this a press club seems absolutely essential. 



In a recent letter to the Signal, the Commandant 
of Cadets speaks of an annual encampment as an 
excellent educator in the more practical side of mili- 
tary affairs. We cannot endorse this idea too heart- 



26 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



27 



ily and we are pleased to learn that a sentiment in 
favor of the same is increasing among the students. 
Very little drill can now be carried on under condi- 
tions as they would be in actual warfare and the 
entire battalion is in dense ignorance concerning 
camp duties. At present we make a good appear 
ance on parade and Butts' manual and the setting-up 
exercises do more than most of us imagine to supply 
the lack of regular gymnastic work. Moreover the 
precise evolutions of close order instill that respect 
for those in authority which is required of every law- 
abiding citizen. We have discarded that theory still 
held by so many of the rank and file and which has 
been epitomized by one who should have known better 
in to these words : — " Military drill is a bugbear to many 
of you and in my estimation a humbug." Viewed as 
a school for future volunteer army officers we find an 
entirely different proposition. This is not the fault of 
the officers detailed as professors of military science, 
however. We are personally aware of the strenuous 
but unsuccessful efforts made by Major Anderson, 
and his successor Captain Martin, to secure the 
necessary tentage and other equipment so that a 
week or ten days of encampment could be given each 
year. The state has so far declined to loan such 
property of the militia as would be necessary. As 
the college would be bound to make good any dam- 
ages, the inconsistency of this attitude is obvious. If 
much enthusiasm or interest is expected in military 
work it is quite necessary to institute some event to 
which the cadets shall look forward with pleasura- 
ble anticipations. As a result of these conditions we 
may expect a yearly encampment some time. May 
God speed that day. 



The college is now well under way and things have 
settled down for the year. The incubation period for 
the germs of homesickness has passed and but few of 
the entering class were attacked so severely as to 
necessitate the severance of their connection with col- 
lege. Unusual spirit has been developed among the 
students and "dear, old Bay State" has never been 
held in greater affection than at present. The class 
spirit which is apt to disturb the equilibrium of the 
first part of the year has been reduced to a minimum 
and none of that disfiguring society feeling has as yet 
appeared. The football team has gone out against 



overwhelming odds with a dogged and irrepressible 
determination to fight a good fight and the support 
and best wishes of two hundred undergraduates has 
gone with them as they have appeared upon the grid- 
iron, lined up against "the kings of the football 
world." It is well that such conditions exist for if we 
are not able to raise a store of enthusiasm and good- 
will in these clear and bracing days of autumn, how 
can we survive the approaching gloom and cheerless 
ness of the winter season which ends with such a 
melodramatic finale at the time of the final examina- 
tions in February ? And right here we have a per- 
sonal word to say to the student body. In the last 
Signal an article appeared in which the writer depre 
cated the continuance of intercollegiate athletics. 
We published the same because the columns of the 
Signal are open to all contributors who abide within 
the rules of etiquette and reason. It should be 
remembered, however, that the editorial board 
assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions 
expressed by these correspondents and the paper 
makes no official recognizance of them. It would be 
absurd for the College Sicnal to come out emphati- 
cally against athletics in defiance withth; wishes of its 
subscribers. We trust that all may understand 
that the article signed "Student" in the last issue 
was merely a personal expression of opinion. To 
prove this we print in another column a reply to this 
letter written by one of the associate editors and if 
"Student" does not "get his" in this answer we are 
mistaken, that's all. The paper was represented by 
special correspondents at both the Harvard and Dart- 
mouth games and we hope to continue this practice 
in the future in order to secure unbiased accounts of 
these larger football games. Yet another word. 
Last week over in the chapel we heard the coach and 
some of the seniors tell about the wonderful college 
spirit which appeared in the fall of 1903 at the time 
of the game with Amherst. If you will turn to the 
first issue of the Signal you will find these very same 
sentiments suggested and this should clear us from 
charges of pessimism and crankishness. We are 
inclined to agree with Mr. O'Hearn that college spirit 
as indicated by an active interest in athletics has woe- 
fully depreciated since he and his sturdy followers 
went down to Pratt Field in 1903 to suffer a defeat 
which had the moral effects of a glorious victory. 



But we think there is a reason for this. Since then 
we have had no substitute game to create such a 
spirit An attempt was made to infuse like interest 
into the Tuft* game but a contest played a hundred 
miles away can never equal one played year after 
year in this very town. Now, fellow students, there 
is no excuse. On Nov. 3 we play Amherst and a 
large number of our alumni and friends will be on 
hand, almost as much to see how we act, as to watch 
the game. Shall we stand mute on the sidelines, 
indulging in an occasional scattered and mutilated 
yell and farcial song or shall we make Amherst vil- 
lage re echo with our cheers and singing ? H is up to 
you to decide. Perhaps you cannot sing well, pos- 
sibly not at all, but get out at the practice scrim- 
mages and lend your lungs in the production of a 
good, long yell every few minutes anyway. Seniors, 
remember the spirit of your freshman days, juniors 
and sophomores profit by their eximple and come out 
to show the members of the entering class that they 
are not. perchance, attending a fresh-water high 
school in one of our hill-towns but are now at a col- 
lege with all the features of ceaseless loyalty in evi- 
dence. All up for dear, old Bay State ! 




A SUGGESTION. 

The athletic board of Amherst college has decreed 
that hereafter only men who play in either the Dart- 
mouth or Williams games shall be entitled to wear 
the "A " While some of the students may be so 
fanatical as to say with the apostle Nathaniel "Can 
any good thing come out of Nazareth?" (of course 
substituting Amherst for Nazareth), it seems to the 
editor of this column that this scheme is, in some 
respects, an excellent one. At Massachusetts it has 
frequently happened that the present rule requiring a 
man to play at least five games in order to make the 
-M" has caused great Injustice to some players. 
Men have been put into the hard, gruelling scrim- 
mages with Brown and Dartmouth and Williams and 
been terribly punisned by the onslaught of these heavy 
teams. Then these faithful players have been 
removed and forced to the side lines with not a peep 
of a chance against some of the easier propositions 



as Rhode Island. New Hampshire and Springfield 
training school. Naturally those sidetracked in this 
manner have been made "sore" and it is plain that 
they have good reason to be. On our class teams 
men cannot make their numerals unless they play in 
the great game with the other lower class and the 
contests with prep, schools do not count one iota in 
their favor. Thus the inconsistency of the present 
situation is apparent. One or the other rule must be 
wrong and we are inclined to believe that the trouble 
is with the varsity regulation. In the interests of fair 
play and a better game the Signal suggests that the 
athletic association consider a new method of award- 
,ng the football letter. It seems entirely possible to 
discriminate on about three of the more important 
and harder games and to say that those and those 
alone, who play in these games shall be entitled to 

wear the coveted "M." 

football items. 
During the interval between the Brown and Har- 
vard games the team stopped at Auburndale and 
indulged in considerable practice. The good results 
of this were evident in the following game .and the 
opinion of several is that the boys should have scored 
by means of the forward passes which were declared 
illegal by the referee. While we do not like to make 
insinuations, members of the team were not especi- 
ally favorably impressed by the officials and the 
treatment they received at Cambridge., No doubt 
the contrast was greater as they had just come from 
Brown where courtesy and good will are evident. 

A fairly strong scrub has been developed this fall 
and some interesting scrimmages have occurred on 
the field. The second team has however been una- 
ble to make any prolonged stand against the varsity. 
The students have not appeared as interested in these 
features of the game as they might. Although bet- 
ter spirit has been shown this year than since the 
eventful 1903 season, still a larger number of specta- 
tors with more cheering and singing would stimulate 
the work of both teams and incidentally swell the 
scores in the coming games. 

The freshmen have so far been the only ones to 
take much interest in interclass football They have 
a large squad out working twice a week with the 
tackling dummy and bucking machine and have 






28 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



arranged a schedule with several high school teams. 
There are some good men in the squad and 1910 
feels confident of winning in the sophomore-fresh- 
man contest but time alone will show up the victor. 

Brown, 17 ; M. A. C, 0. 

By a powerful attack and varied formation, Brown 
succeeded in defeating Massachusetts at Providence, 
Oct. 10, 17 to 0. Our boys were unable to gain 
their distance while Brown gained at the critical 
moments. In the first half we reached the nearest 
to the home eleven's goal and that was their 
35 yard line. Brown scored twice in the first half 
and once in the second. For our team the tackles 
seemed weak. Cobb starred as usual at quarter 
and Bartlett excelled in the line. One of Brown's 
touchdowns resulted from line bucking, the others 
from fumbles. Penalizing occurred frequently on 
both sides. Tripping, hurdling and holding marred 
the play of both teams. 

The line-up : — 



BROWN. 

Pryor, 1. e. 

Kirley. I. t. 

Westervelt, 1. g. 

Steere. c. 

Avler. Grinnel. r. g. 

Hazard, r. t. 

Campbell. Thurlow. r. e. 

Schwartz, q. b. 

Mayhew, Pearsall. I. h. b.. 

Curtis, Tinkham, r. h. b. 

McDonald. Bushnell, f. b. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. e.. Bartlett 

r. t., Sexton 

r. g.. Cutter 

c, Paige 

1. g.. Summers. Anderson 

1. t.. Farley 

I. e.. Chapman 

q. b.. Cobb 

r. h. b.. Crosby 

1. h. b.. Watkins 

f. b.. Willis 



Touchdowns — Pryor, Kirley. McDonald. Goals from 
touchdowns — McDonald 2. Referee — Keady of Dartmouth. 
Umpire — Burleigh of Exeter. Head linesman — Hunt of 
Brown. Time of halves — 20 and 15 minutes. Attendance — 
400. 

Harvard, 21 ; M. A. C, 0. 

[From our special reporter.] 
Harvard defeated our boys in an interesting game 
on Soldiers' Field, Oct. 13. M. A. C. was out 
weighed about 20 pounds to a man but they put- 
up a very snappy game. Twice they executed the 
forward pass prettily but both times the referee 
brought the ball back and gave it to Harvard. Mass- 
achusetts was within hailing distance of Harvard's 
goal two or three times and twice Cobb tried a drop 
kick but the first time it was blocked and the last 



time he failed to get the kick off square and it did not 
go the required distance. 

Burr opened the game by kicking off to Crosby on 
his 10-yard line and he returned it twenty yards 
before being downed. Five yards were gained in 
line-bucking and then Cobb punted to Hall who ran 
the ball back ten yards. Harvard punted to Cobb 
who was downed in his tracks. Watkins gained five 
yards on a delayed pass and Cobb punted about sixty 
yards. Hall misjudged it and the ball rolled down 
the field and over the goal line. Burr punted from 
the 25-yard line to Watkins who returned it about 
five yards. After a few line plunges Cobb again 
punted to Hall who fumbled but recovered and ran 
twenty-five yards when he was downed by Crosby, a 
Massachusetts man falling on the ball. Harvard was 
penalized five yards for a line man being off-side. 
Cobb took a difficult chance at a drop kick but Burr 
broke through and blocked it, Harvard getting the ball. 
Burr punted to Philbrick who ran in seven yards. 
Massachusetts was penalized fifteen yards for holding. 
After a few line plunges, assisted by a tackle-end 
run by Lockwood of ten yards, Gray was hauled over 
the line for a touchdown by Burr and Kersberg. Burr 
failed at an easy goal. Score, Harvard 5, Massa- 
chusetts, 

Burr again kicked off this time to Watkins, on the 
edge of the field, who ran the ball in fifteen yards. 
Cobb then punted to Foster. Harvard now used 
their heavy center trio and backs and by mass plays 
rushed the ball down the field. Gray making the sec- 
ond touchdown. Burr failed at the try for a goal. 
Score, Harvard 10, Massachusetts, 0. 

Cobb kicked off to Gray who assisted by good 
interference ran in eighteen yards. Massachusetts 
now got the ball and Chapman gained thirty yards on 
a triangle pass but again the referee brought back the 
ball and gave it to Harvard. Burr punted and Cobb 
made a fair catch. After a few line plays Cutter 
downed Foster and Burr attempted to pass but 
Anderson cleverly dodged between Harvard's heavy 
center and guard and blocked the punt, the ball roll- 
ing back toward Gray who fell on it. Burr punted 
to Watkins who ran in six yards. Chapman gained 
fifty yards on a forward pass but the referee still 
refused to allow It and gave the ball again to Har- 
vard, placing them near our goal. Burr's punt was 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



99 



blocked and Crosby made five yards on an end run. 
Cobb tried a drop kick from the 55-yard line but the 
distance was too short. Burr punted to Cobb who 
made no gain. Here the half ended, Harvard lead- 
ing by ten points. 

Between the halves a few Massachusetts men and 
alumni got together and gave some cheers for the 
team. In the second half Harvard resorted to mass 
plays and plowed down the field for two touchdowns. 
Cobb kicked off to Gray on the 5-yard line. Cobb 
then made a long punt after Massachusetts received 
the ball but the referee penalized our team 1 yards 
for alleged holding. Cobb again punted to Hall who 
made no gain. Lockwood made a short kick and 
Cobb tried for a fair catch. He was given fifteen 
yards for interference by the Harvard ends and also 
had a chance at a free kick. He elected to try a 
drop kick but looked a bit nervous and the ball did 
not strike the ground right and flew off at a wrong 
angle. Burr and Cobb exchanged punts with the 
latter making the best showing. By mass plays 
Harvard secured another touchdown. Burr missed 
the goal. Score, Harvard 15. Massachusetts 0. 

Cobb kicked off to Wendell on his 5-yard line and 
he ran it in about twenty yards. By mass plays and 
one onside kick Harvard secured their last touch- 
down Burr kicked the goal. Score, Harvard 21, 
Massachusetts, 0. Burr then kicked to Watkins 
and after a few rushes Cobb kicked to Hall. Before 
the latter could run back time was called. Cobb and 
Anderson excelled for Massachusetts and Lockwood 
played best for Harvard. 
The line-up : - - 



Timer _F. Wood. Time-20-minute halves. Attendance- 
8000. 



Lack of space postpones the account of the Dart- 
mouth game until the next issue. 



Collet N°*«S- 



HARVARD 

Burnham. Miller. 1. e. 
Osborne. Hoar. I. t. 
Burr. 1. g. 
Parker. Fraser, c. 
Kersberg. r. g. 
Warren, Pierce, r. t. 
Orr. Kennard, r. e. 
Hall, Taylor, q. b. 
Foster, Lincoln. 1. h. b. 
Lockwood, r. h. b. 
Gray, Wendell, f. b. 
Score— Harvard 21. 



MASSACHUSETTS 

r. e.. Bartlett 

r. t., Sexton 

r. g.. Cutter 

c, Paige 

1. g.. Anderson 

1. t.. Farley 

I. e., Chapman, Barry 

q. b., Cobb 

r. h. b., Watkins 

I. h. b.. Crosby. Schermerhorn 

f. b., Willis 

Massachusetts. 0. Touchdowns- 



Gray 2, Wendell 2. Goal from touchdown-Burr. Referee 
-G S Hapgood. Umpires-H. H. Holton and H. Dad- 
man Linesmen-Allen of Massachusetts. Jones of Harvard. 



—The first half of the \90Q Index has gone to press 
and all indications point to an excellent book, out "on 

time." 

—Preparations are being made to drain the field 
east of the veterinary laboratory. Tne round tile will 

be used. 

—Captain Martin is contemplating the formation of 
a fire brigade, to consist of those students who room 

near college. 

— H. T. Wheeler has been elected to fill the 
vacancy on the '08 Index board caused by the resigna- 
tion of H. L. White. 

Last week Monday the freshmen had th-:ir class 
picture taken on the chapel steps. One division was 
obliged to cut to be present. 

—The football game scheduled for Oct. 1 7th at 
Wesleyan was cancelled on account of thr inaugur.i 
tion of President Butterfield. 

After the inauguration there was a meeting of 
the trustees at the Amherst House. Plans for the 
future were informally discussed. 

At a recent meeting of the trustees of the Clarke 
school for the deaf at Northampton, Professor Mills 
was re-elected to the board of directors. 

President Butterfieli's father is in town for a 
couple of weeks. He arrived before the inauguration 
and has been taking in some of the sights about town. 
—Last Thursday class pictures were taken of '07, 
'08 and '09. The football squad also had their plot 
ure taken. These photographs were secured for the 
1908 Index. 

—The college store has changed hands once within 
the past few days and it is rumored that another 
change is not far distant. S. J. Wright, '08, is at 
present proprietor. 

—The three companies made their first appear- 
ance in complete uniform, this year at the presi- 
dent's inauguration. The dress this year requires 
that white cuffs as well as white gloves shall be worn. 









30 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



3» 



Notice! Alumni. On Saturday, Nov. 10, at 7-30 
p. m. there will be an alumni banquet at the Amherst 
House. Those intending to be present should notify 
E. B. Holland before Nov. I. 

— A considerable number of students accompanied 
the football team to Dartmouth. A fewer number, 
largely freshmen, were present at the Harvard game, 
but at the latter many alumni, including a good dele- 
gation from '05, were on hand to cheer the team. 

— Among the guests at the inauguration none met 
with a more hearty reception than Major John Ander- 
son. Both at the exercises in the chapel and later in 
the drill hall the major held an inpromptu reception 
which was as cordial sa that accorded to the new 
president. 

—One week ago last Tuesday occurred the 
hardest rainstorm of the season. Over two inches 
of water fell between 3 and 8 o'clock. As the 
rain found the classes widely scattered and drill hour 
was almost at hand it can be imagined how many got 
wet. 

— J. R. Parker, '08, was elected to the Signal 
board by his class, and at the last meeting of the 
editorial staff he was elected assistant business mana- 
ger of the paper. White, '08, did not return to col- 
lege this year thus causing the vacancy which Parker 
has been chosen to fill. 

— At the mass meeting held the night before the 
team left for Dartmouth considerable enthusiasm was 
aroused. Among the speakers were Chace, Peters, 
Shattuck, Captain Cutter and Coach O'Hearn. It 
was suggested that there should be more singing and 
cheering at the scrub practice. 

— President Butterfield delivered an address before 
the New England Association of School Superintend- 
ents at Worcester Oct. 10. He then made a trip to 
Rhode Island and delivered an informal talk before 
"the boys" at the student banquet. From there he 
proceeded to Cambridge and made a very interested 
spectator of the M. A. C. game with Harvard. 

— A week ago Saturday occurred a very interesting 
baseball game between teams representing North 
and South college. Owing to the mild weather 
of the week before the teams had quite a bit 
of practice. Although South college won 9 the 
game was not so onesided as might appear. Ten 



gallons of good cider was furnished by the losing team. 
—The Y. M. C. A. held on Oct. 1 1th was led by 
Mr. Evans, the secretary of the Northampton Y. M. 
C. A. The topic of the evening was "Leadership" 
and Mr. Evans brought out many helpful points. At 
the last weed's meeting Mr. Jacks spoke. This gen- 
tleman came to us from the Y. M. C. A. at Hartford 
and in an interesting way he presented the seven 
reasons why he believed the Bible to be inspired by 
God. 



THE INAUGURATION. 

Kenyon L. Butterfield was formally inaugurated 
president of the college on Wednesday afternoon, 
Oct. 17. The exercises began promptly at 2-30. 
The undergraduates, dressed in drill uniform, were 
lined up in open ranks beside the walk from the drill 
hall to the chapel, the procession passing between the 
files to the chapel. President Butterfield was escorted 
by Charles A. Gleason, vice-president of the board of 
trustees, and they were followed by the trustees, visit- 
ing presidents of colleges, specially invited guests and 
the alumni of the college. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. Henry Hague of the class 
of 1875, now pastor of the St. Matthew's Episcopal 
church at Worcester. Charles A. Gleason welcomed 
and called the names of the list of visiting presidents. 
After each one was called the students gave a rousing 
"short" yell for the institution represented. The list 
included the following : — 

President L. Clark Seelye of Smith college, Presi- 
dent William E. Huntington of Boston university, 
Prof. George D. Olds of Amherst college (acting), 
President Mary E. Wooiley of Mount Holyoke college, 
President G. Stanley Hall of Clark university, Presi- 
dent Henry Lefavour of Simmons college, President 
Charles S. Howe of Case school of applied science, 
Prof. Alfred E. Burton of Massachusetts institute of 
technology, President Rufus W. Stimson of Connecti- 
cut agricultural college, President Howard Edwards of 
Rhode Island college of agriculture and mechanic arts. 
President George E. Fellows of University of Maine, 
Prof. C. D. Smith of Michigan Agricultural college. 
Dr. Edward Hitchcock of Amherst college. 

Mr. Gleason then read a letter from the Rhode 
Island coilege expressing the best wishes of that insti- 
tution for the welfare and prosperity of Massachusetts 



a hope that Mr. Butterfield's administration shall 
i crowned with success. It was signed by John K. 
.amond and Winfred S. Kendrick for the student 
>ody of the other college. 

On behalf of the trustees, Mr. Gleason made an 
opening address of welcome. After paying well 
deserved tribute to the alumni of the college he briefly 
commented upon the presidents of the college during 
the last forty-two years and spoke especially of 
Henry H. Goodell. He then closed his address with 
the following words : 

•We welcome you in behalf of the state of Massa- 
shusetts to these grounds and halls as custodian and 
director, believing they are placed in good hands. 
We welcome you to this body of students, represent- 
ing the best brain of the land, athletic in body, eager 
and active in mind, brought together here for the train- 
ing and culture this institution affords. 

And now, Mr. President, in behalf of these trustees, 
! give you our most cordial and hearty welcome, 
assuring you of our support and assistance when 
needed. You will find the board of trustees loyal to 
•he college and Its president,— several of them the 
alumni of the college and all of them its loyal friends." 
Marquis F. Dickinson, Esq., of Boston as a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees presented the charter, 
seal and keys of the college to Mr. Butterfield and 
thus officially inaugurated him as president of the col- 
lege. In so doing he made a few forceful and fitting 
ren arks. Briefly sketching the administrations of the 
former presidents he paid especial tribute to that 
"opumistic, brilliant, dashing professor and colonel, 
Will am S. Clark," who was elected to the presidency 
in 1667. "To him," said Mr. Dickinson, "more 
than to any other man is due the selection of this town 
for tre location of the new institution. It was through 
his efforts in town-meeting and elsewhere that the 
citizens were persuaded to vote $75,000 that they 
might be burdened with another colleg?." He then 
gave a brief biographical sketch of President Goodeil's 
life, and paid a glowing tribute to his worth and 
character as a teacher and a man. He spoke particu- 
larly of what President Goodell did in creating the col- 
lege library, and made an appeal for some one to build 
"the Henry Hill Goodell memorial library." Mr. 
Dicknson spoke of the grateful appreciation felt by 
the board of trustees for the work done by Prof. Wil- 



liam P. Brooks, who served as acting president from 
the death of President Goodell to the coming of Presi- 
dent Butterfield. 

After speaking of the eminent training which Presi- 
dent Butterfield had received for his work, Mr. Dick- 
inson closed with a suggestion so apt and so important 
that we quote the remainder of the addresss in full. 
"You are never to forget that you are the head and 
ruler of this college. To you the trustees commit its 
government and guidance. Take the advice of your 
faculty when you need it or when you cannot get along 
without it, and then (to borrow the language of our 
courts) decide each case 'according to the law and 
the evidence given you.' As trustees, we refuse to 
constitute ourselves a court of appeals for the decision 
of mooted questions that may arise between you and 
others here. We snail be willing «o act only under 
very exceptional circumstances or in great emergen- 
cies. Such responsibilities as these will sometimes 
demand of you great firmness. 

And now, Kenyon Leech Butterfield. bachelor of 
science, master of arts, speaking in the name and on 
behalf of the board of trustee., delegated by them to 
perform this act of investiture, I commit to your 
hands, as the emblems of your authority here, the 
charter, the by-laws and the keys of this institution. 
1 pronounce you president of the Massachusetts Agri 
cultural college, and as such present you to this sym- 
pathetic and waiting audience. Above all things. I 
invoke for you and your great work the constant favor 
and blessing of Almighty God." 

President Butterfield in accepting the office chose 
for his inaugural address: "The forward movement 
in agricultural education." Lack of space prevents 
the printing of any considerable portion. Suffice 
to say that it covers fully the question from the 
pedagogical, socialogical and administrative points of 
view and may be considered as a distinct contribution 
to the economic aspect of agricultural education. 

In ending this account of the inauguration we can 
do no better than to express the thoughts of th ; clos- 
ing paragraph of President Butterfield's address i 

••in closing, may 1 indulge in a brief personal word? 
I come to this college full of optimism for the prog- 
ress of American agriculture, full of hope for the bet- 
terment of agriculture in New England, and with a 
firm faith in the mission and opportunities open to the 



V 



m 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



33 



Massachusetts Agricultural college. I desire to con- 
serve all that is best in the structure that has been 
wrought by the toil and wisdom of those who have 
served here. I wish to see the college make full use 
of every new opportunity as it arises. I am not 
anxious for mere numbers, nor shall I ignore the 
value of numbers. I shall be ambitious for the col- 
lege to keep its place among the great agricultural 
colleges of the world. 1 shall be jealous of its honor 
and fame. 1 am aware that I follow in the steps of 
one greatly loved, whose single-hearted service for 
long years imposes a great task as well as bestows a 
great blessing on his successors. 1 take the reins 
from the hands of one of the sons of the college, 
whose patience, wisdom and powers of toil have car- 
ried the college most successfully over a difficult 
portage. In attempting to follow these men, I must 
ask from all the most generous support and the kind- 
est charity. I need the loyalty of the alumni ; the 
fidelity of the student body ; the hearty co-operation 
of the faculty ; the support of the trustees ; the con- 
sideration of every citizen of Amherst; the earnest 
help of the farmers, and the intelligent interest of the 
general public. May I not hope for all these, at least 
until I prove unworthy of them? In return all 1 can 
now give is a most earnest pledge of devotion to the 
college and its highest interests, as God gives me the 
vision to see those interests, and with his help to 
attempt to unlock the future's portal with a key 
designed In the light of the great need which this col- 
lege seems destined to fulfill." 



"ANOTHER POINT OF VIEW/' 

The "Student," who in the last issue of the Signal 
"exposed himself to the maledictions of most young 
people" as he says, had done better to have thought 
a little more on this subject before launching out into 
such an erratic, desultory, purposeless cry against the 
most manly of American college activities and one of 
the best educators of the college student in ways of 
manliness. Perhaps his article would have carried 
some weight if he had signed his name to it and thus 
shown that he was fully in sympathy with all that he 
said and had not tried to shirk the responsibility for it 
by signing a meaningless epithet "Student," making 
it possible for an unthinking person to lay the blame 
for the article upon any one or all of the two hundred 



students in college. He shews the absurdity of his 
position by thinking to place himself in the ranks with 
President Eliot of Harvard as if perhaps to throw the 
responsibility for his position upon that worthy digni 
tary. The narrow-m.r.ded strain in which the article 
is written shows the small amount of thinking that 
was done on the subject. 

It seems to me that athietics as an educator in our 
colleges cannot be too highly estimated ; they give a 
broadness of mind, an alertness, a self-control, a ten 
dency to overcome obstacles, which all can be 
attained to no such high degree In any other depart 
ment of the college; and, if you will look back In 
the early Indexes and find the names of those who 
made the athletics in this college at that time ana 
then turn to the last Index and look up these names 
under the list of our alumni you will find with very 
few exceptions that the men who made our athletics 
are the men who have succeeded especially well in 
life. It seems that in grasping for the baseball or foot 
ball they have obtained a firmer grasp on the practica 
bilities of life. Is not this alone sufficient reason why 
athletics should live and prosper ? 

That athletics advertise a college to a greater 0" 
less degree, it seems to me, cannot be disputed. 
Did you never hear high school students recounting 
and discussing the victories and defeats of various 
college teams or did you never do it yourself ? It Is 
probably true that some of our best men have been 
encouraged to select this college as their alma mater 
by its athletics. Undoubtedly there is time taken 
from studies by athletics that could be spent on them 
to advantage, but, do you count a "whole week lost" 
In taking a trip through our New England country 
visiting two or three other colleges. Why, this Is the 
most liberal form of education ; it is from such a trip 
as this that one gets new aspirations and new inspira- 
tions as well. 

That the athletic association has demanded too 
much money you kickers-against-taxes will probably 
agree but did you ever stop to thtnk that if you went 
through college without having to pay out anything to 
support it how little you would appreciate the real 
value of your college life. One seldom appreciates 
anything till it is taken away or has to be paid for. 
Athletics are a real living part of college life, an 
essential part to make it wholesome and cause it to 



be properly assimmiiated. Intercollegiate athletics 
foster college spirit and infuse an interest into things 
which nothing else can do. Think of replacing them 
entirely by interclass contests and the like. What 
would it make of us ? Why, rowdyism would be the 
result ; disagreements and scraps would be endless 
and college spirit would be entirely lost in the mix-up. 
The article in question states that business ability 
has not been shown by some of our managers and 
that they have not Deen prudent In the expenditure of 
the association funds. If the writer held any such 
idea why did he not go to those particular managers 
like a man and tell them wnat he thought j not come 
around after they have gone out from college, and 
make such a statement in such an irresponsible man- 
ner. In short the "Student" seems to be writing 
about something concerning which he knows little or 

nothing. 

Now let us give a long yell for athletics and old 
Mass'chusetts, may they never be separated. 

O. B. B.'09. 

(Note — The foregoing is a contributed article. Tne Sig- 
nal will not be responsible for opinions or statements con- 
tained therein— Ed.) 



Dcp&rtmf rvt" f4o-t*s. 



HORTICULTURE. 
At a recent exhibit of the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural society, this department took two first prizes In 
fruit. The prize winners were Rhode Island Green- 
ings and Suttons, apples grown in the orchard on the 
"Hill." Mr. Blake secured some of the best exhib- 
its for use in the advanced class in pomology. Other 
prize exhibits will be secured for study purposes from 
the Kansas State fair, and the Michigan Agricultural 
college also promises to help out our work with 
contributions. 

Mr. Blake has resigned his position as assistant In 
the horticultural department of M. A. C. to accept a 
position as head of the horticultural department and 
experiment station of New Jersey school of agricul- 
ture, incorporated with Rutgers college. His resig- 
nation takes effect Dec. 1 . 

Professor Waugh has recently published a new 
book entitled "Dwarf Fruit Trees." It deals with 
dwarf trees, their propagation, pruning and general 



management, in their especial relation to the United 
States and Canada. A brief outline Is as follows : 
general considerations, advantages and disadvantages, 
propagation, pruning, special forms, general manage- 
ment, dwarf apples, pears, peaches, plums, bush 
fruits, and trees in pots. The book is unique of Its 
kind, being the first ever written on the subject. We 
have all noticed with pleasure the large lawn vase 
which has been placed in the center of the west 
plaza of Wilder hall. The vase is a costly one, the 
gift of Trustee Draper, of Worcester. It has been 
filled with hardy plants which will successfully resist 
the frost of the next few days. The vase gives a 
bit of finish to that side of the building, which, with 
other contemplated improvements, will make it one of 
the prettiest places on the campus. Perhaps at this 
time we might also call attention to the palms and 
other green plants which have been placed in the cor 
idors and reading room of Wilder hall. They give a 
touch of freshness and beauty which makes one long 
for similar decorations In the other college buildings. 
What a pleasure it would be to have the bareness of 
the chapel similarly relieved 1 

BOTANY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY. 
The heating of the East Experiment station Is 
accomplished this year by connection with the cen- 
tral heating plant. This Is, of course, by steam. 
But the greenhouses are still to be heated with hot 
water, the water being heated in a huge tank by 
steam. This insures greater regularity and unifor- 
mity in heating the small houses. 

Work on Clark hall Is progressing rapidly, and It is 
hoped that by December the building will be roofed 
over. The masonry has already reached the second 
floor, and the steps on either side of the building are 
completed. Some of the steps in these stairs have a 
weight of nearly four tons. The force of men work- 
ing on the building is continually being increased, and 
the work rushed with every possible expediency. 

An improvement has been made over the foot- 
power seed blower used by this depirtment in separat- 
ing seed. A water-motor supplies compressed air, 
which is regulated by cocks and giuges to suit the 
grade of seed used. Special glass tubes are being 
made for the work, it being possible to operate several 
tubes at the same time. 






? -< 



34 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



35 



Dr. Stone delivered a lecture before the Hamp- 
shire County Fruit Growers association, the conven- 
tion being held Tuesday, Sept. 16, In Greenfield. 
DIVISION OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 
Owing to the resignation of F. G. Helyar, P. H. 
Smith spent the first two weeks in October in the 
northern and western portions of the State completing 
the autumn inspection of concentrated feeds. About 
400 samples have been collected ; some are being 
examined microscopically to identify their different 
components and to detect possible adulteration, and 
the entire collection will be analyzed chemically dur- 
ing the next month. It is possible because of the 
present facilities for rapid work to make 100 nitro- 
gens and 28 single fat determinations in a single day. 
The new comptometer greatly facilitates and simpli- 
fies the calculation of the results. 

Anson L. Strong formerly herdsman at the college 
farm has been making some official tests of Holstein- 
Friesian cows at the farms of F. F. and D. W. 
Field, Brockton. Mr. Strong also conducted the 
competitive milk and butter fat tests at the Brockton 
fair. A. D. Guiel a former short course man is 
making similar tests at the farm of J. B. Marcou, 
Princeton. 

It is expected that E. B. Holland will represent the 
Station at the coming meeting of the Association of 
Official Agricultural Chemists to be held at Washing- 
ton, Nov. 14-17. This division has done consider- 
able work for the association the past year in investi- 
gation methods for the analysis of condensed milk, 
molasses and allied products, and maple sugar. It 
has also assisted in studying methods for the deter- 
mination of available and organic nitrogen. 

Bulletin No. 1 10 entitled "Market Milk" the work 
of P. H. Smith has attracted considerable attention, 
and the edition is nearly exhausted. It has been 
freely noticed and commented upon by the agricul- 
tural and dairy press of the country, and liberal 
abstracts made. The Ntiv England Homestead and the 
New England Farmer and Farming, (the latter pub- 
lished by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York) have 
solicited and reproduced tne cuts. 

A number of valuable scientific works have 
recently been added to the working library of this 
divlson, including Prescott's Organic Analysis, Leach's 



Food Analysis, Lewkowitsch's Analysis of Fats and 
Oils, Konig's Untersuchung Landw. wichtiger Stoffe, 
Kuhn's Futterengslehre, Pott's Futtermittel, L'lndus- 
trie Laiterie, Alimentation de Chevaux, etc. 

W. K. Hepburn, a resident of Sunderland, and 
formerly a student of Bates college has recently been 
engaged to fill the position made vacant by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Helyar. 

An importation order has recently been placed for 
an Abbe refractometer for the purpose of studying 
the refractive index of oils, fats and different liquid 
substances. 



Alumni. 



The following alumni accepted invitations to be 
present at the inauguration of the president, Oct. 17 : 

71._W. P. Birnie. 

'71.— H. L. Cowles. 

'71.— E. B. Smead. 

72. C. O. Flagg. 

76.— C. F. Deuel. 

'80.— W. G. Lee. 

'81.— Austin Peters. 

'82.— M. B. Kingman. 

'83.— H. J. Wheeler. 

'86.— C. F. W. Felt. 

'88.— H. C. Bliss. 

'90.— F. O. Williams. 

•91._H. T. Shores. 

'92.— J. E. Deuel. 

'92.— M. H. Williams. 

'95. — H. D. Hemenway. 

'98. _ C. G. Clark. 
Nearly all of the resident alumni attended the 
exercises also. 

'82. — Dr. G. E. Stone spent a few days this sum- 
mer with C. S. Plumb, professor of animal husbandry 
at the Ohio State university. The state of Ohio has 
been very liberal to its college and Professor Plumb 
has secured a fine equipment with which to work. 

'88.— F. F. Noyes, address is 472 North Jackson 
I St. , Atlanta, Ga. 

'96. — S. W. Fletcher, professor of horticulture at 
jthe Michigan Agricultural college, has published a 
! first-rate book entitled "How to make a Fruit Gar- 



ti." In many ways it is the best book ever publ- 
ished in that line. 

■96. Frank L. Clapp has changed his address to 

Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. The headquarters of 
the Hudson River Division of the Catskill Aqueduct 
has been moved from New Hamburg to Cornwall-on- 
Hudson, and has made necessary the change in Mr. 
Clapp's residence. Mrs. Clapp has been critically ill 
with malaria the past summer and is now recovering 
slowly at her former home In Boston. 

•99. At the Second Unitarian church, Salem, on 

Tuesday evening, Oct. 16, at 7 o'clock, Herbert W. 
Dana was married to Miss Adeline Rogers Perkins of 
Salem. After Jan. 1, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Dana 
will be at home at 5 Roslyn St., Salem. Mr. Dana 
is with the R. H. White Co., Boston, as assistant 
advertising manager. 

'00.— J. E. Haliigan of New Orleans spent a 
week of his vacation In Amherst this summer. 

•00. M. A. Campbell, is at present teaching in 

the high school at Bingham, Me. 

'00.— James W. Kellogg, now in Atlanta, Ga., is 
recovering from a severe attack of typhoid fever. 

'02. F. R. Church announces the birth of a 

daughter, Cornelia Bassett, on July 21. 

'02. — A son has been born to Mr. and Mrs. A. L. 
Dacy, of Ipswich. 

'02.— Howard L. Knight was married to Miss 
Cora J. Stickney of Fitchburg at Gardner, on Aug. 
29. Only the immediate relatives were present at 
the wedding. After a short trip, Mr. and Mrs. 
Knight went to Washington, D. C, where Mr. 
Knight is now employed as an editorial assistant in 
the office of Experiment Stations of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. Address 1715 
De Sales St., Washington, D. C. 

'02.— D. Nelson West has just returned from a 
nine months survey in Cuba, and will be engaged for 
the next six months in the erection of a large power 
house near Washington. Address Bennings, D. C, 
care of J. G.White & Co. 

'03.— Invitations are out for the wedding of E. M. 
Poole to Miss Ethel Clapp, to occur Oct. 31 . 

'03.— E. B. Sne'.l of New Haven spent a few days 
at college recently. 



Geo. F.Vester.Jr. 

TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 

485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 






I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying % Cl*ning x Pressing, and Repairing. 



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Drop me a poRtal ami I will call on you. 

tr-Kull Urea. Bulla to rent. •*-.st l i.l«-..t... Clotb. bought. 

7 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 
Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 

best in the market. 



NEXT TO FIRST RATIONAL BANK. 






-7/ 



36 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'04. — S. B. Haskell took a short course at the 
University of Illinois this summer. 

'04. — On Wednesday, Sept. 19, Z. T. Hubert and 
Miss Alice A. Hall of Pensacola, Fla., were married 
at Pensacola. They are living at 72 TatnallSt., 
Atlanta, Ga., where Mr. Hubert is superintendent 
of the Spelman Seminary. 

'04. — On Monday, Sept. 3, A. L. Peck and Sara 
B. Root of Amherst were married In Amherst. Mr. 
and Mrs. Peck are now living at Pointe Claire, P. Q., 
Canada. 

'05. — J. R. Kelton is instructor In zoology and 
geology at the Michigan Agricultural college. 

'05. — A. N. Swain, superintendent of the New 
York department of H. L. Frost & Co., Foresters, 
Room 1019, Flatiron Building, New York city. 

'06. — Edwin H. Scott, principal of Petersham high 
school, Petersham. Mr. Scott visited college for a 
few days recently and procured a collection of seeds 
to be used in his class work at the school. He is 
engaged in a very interesting and important work, as 
the experiment is being tried of making it largely an 
agricultural high school, agriculture and allied sub- 
jects receiving considerable prominence. Nature 
study is also being taught in the lower grades of the 
Petersham schools, under Mr. Scott's supervision. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas it hath pleased Cod in His infinite wisdom to take 
to himself the mother of our friend and brother Samuel S. 
Crossman ; be it 

Resolved. That we the members of the Amherst chapter of 
the Q T. V. fraternity do extend to him and his family our 
sincere sympathy in this their, hour of sorrow ; and be it 
further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolution be sent to the 
bereaved family, that a copy be filed in the Chapter rooms 
and that a copy be published in the College Signal 
Hermon T. Wheeler. ) 
Lamert S. Corbett, > For the Fraternity. 
James A. Hyslop. ) 

We, the class of nineteen hundred and nine, wish to 
express our heartfelt sympathy to our classmate Samuel 
Sutton Crossman in his bereavement upon the death of his 
mother. 

Lamert S. Corbett. 
George M. Brown. [ 
Charles H. White. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, TH r COLLEGE SIGNAL 

imr.YOKE mass JL * Mm* ^h^ 



HOLYOKE, MASS 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFK OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. II. BOWK Kit & CO. 

THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 

Most Attractive Cafe in New England. 

Private Dining Rooms fur Ladies and Theatre Parties. 

Class and Fraternity Banquets a specialty. 

Try our Special Sunday Dinners, 5 i\ m. to 8.30 v. m., 5<><' 

When In town give us a trial and be convinced. 

Open until midnight. 

KDWARD A. LKWIS, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - - HoLroKK, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



NOTICE. 



All 1 5c. brands of Cigarettes 
2 for 25c. at 

HENRY ADAMS & GO. 




,0L. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 7. 1906 



NO. 4 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. ^ 

«nt to .11 subscriber, until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are pa>d. 
Krtify the Business Manager. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 

RALPH JEROME WATTS 1907. Business Manager. 

JOHN ROBERT PARKER. .908. ^^^^Z^ BARTLETT. .907. 
ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGCINS. 1907. Alumn. Notes. EDW 1N DANIELS PHILBR1CK. 1908. 

OSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN, 1907. College Notes. daNa farrar ,o 8. 

,ANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908. Department Notes. ORWELL BURLTON BR1CCS. 1909. 

EORCE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR.. 1909. 



Tern.l:|I.OOp«rs«lft»'<W"*' 8lo a" CopieS ' '° C 



Poettg. ontside el United Stetee end Cenede. 2»c. ertra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



M. C A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
allege Senate. 
Reading- Room Association. 
|Basket-ball Association, 



C. H. White. Pres. 

M. H. Clark. Jr.. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

J. N. Summers. Sec. 

H. T. Pierce. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

Base-Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry, Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
E. G Bartlett, Manager. 



Entered as seeond-C*«l metier. N* Office sj Am-.-v 
umlauts v immw»v »»\<n*»» 



£drtori&ls. 



A word seems necessary concerning the time when 
ISicnal copy is due. Outside contributors should 
remember that all long articles must be in the hands 
of the editor-in-chief or in the mail box by 6 p. m. on 
the Friday before the paper is issued the following 
Wednesday. Articles of special importance may be 
received up to ten on Monday but we cannot guaran- 
tee publication. Mere notices of three or four lines 
can be inserted sometimes very early Tuesday but 
thereafter the forms are absolutely closed. We will 
I not be responsible for mistakes in articles submitted 
I after Friday night and in general we do not care to 
publish the same. 



102 Main St 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



It is with regret that we announce the resignation 
of Mr. Blake as instructor in horticulture. During 
the year and more which he has been with us he has 
shown to those who did not know him in his student 
days that he is a loyal alumnus and an excellent 



teacher. As a graduate member of the athletic 
board he has indicated a commendable interest in 
sports and has done all in his power to foster an 
aggressive and winning spirit in athletics. As a 
member of the faculty he has also done good work 
although it has not been accomplished with the flour- 
ish of trumpetry which characterizes the efforts of 
some. Mr. Blake has especially done much to assist 
those who have been specializing in horticulture and 
has arranged his courses so far as it lay in his power 
to give a practical Instruction in the subjects at hand. 
We wish him every success in his new work. 

There is a certain class of fellows about college 
who delight in kicking and in ridiculing everything 
which comes their way. This is not strange for 
the college man is a natural kicker. A somewhat 
hasty analysis of conditions here leads us to divide 
these people into two sub-divisions. First, there is 
the man who is a charter and honorary member of 
the -knockers' club." He will "knock" anyway, 
just for the sake of hearing his tongue wag and for 












m ni i iwnn 



38 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



39 



the privilege of getting the applause of his comrades 
who are not up to his standard as a mud-slinger. 
These men respect no one from the faculty to the 
clerk of the weather or from the Y. M. C. A. to the 
College Signal but they must find an outlet for their 
chaff somewhere so no one pays any serious attention 
to them. The other class comprises those who have 
some real or fancied grudge against the existing order 
of things. As is quite to be expected the Signal 
comes in for its share of the criticism and is the 
object of much fault- finding. Within the past few 
weeks we have heard the editorials of this paper con- 
demned as too "Hearst-like" and radical, we have 
been told that the athletic notes are "rotten" and the 
college notes column has been likened to the gossip 
of a sewing circle. Then the alumni editor has "got 
his" indiscriminately and to cap the climax a grad- 
uate wrote recently to the paper invoking the aid of 
the Almighty in an effort of the Signal Board "to 
brace up." It is not difficult to carry home most of 
this criticism. During the past year the Signal has 
Incurred the enmity, or better, a certain coldness on 
the part of a few by its policy of getting at the truth 
of matters. When conservative, easy-going and 
self-satisfied conditions are disturbed the intruder 
does not receive the most cordial welcome. We 
believe however that the majority of the subscribers 
of this paper are satisfied with things as they are. 
No news is good news and it is inferred that those 
who keep quiet are with us in spirit. With this 
thought in mind the Signal will continue along its 
present lines so long as the existing editorial board is 
In control. 



In one of the college class rooms a professor 
recently made some remarks of which the following is 
the substance : "If I keep on I shall soon have enough 
goose eggs to set several nests and thus you can see 
the bearing of this course on agriculture and poultry- 
raising in particular." We are pleased to hear this 
statement and to be able to publish the same for, like 
many of those who have gone before us and are com- 
ing along behind, we have been unable to properly 
connect some of the courses in the freshman and 
sophomore years with the noble science which has 
such a picturesque and commanding position in the 
title of the college. In preparing a course of study 



it is a very difficult task to arrange subjects in the 
most logical and useful manner. Thus we cannot 
expect that everyone shall be satisfied with the 
required courses of the first two years or possibly with 
even the junior electives. It is to be expected thai 
those who do not care for mathematics will curse the 
prominence of that subject and those who have nc 
interest in the languages bewail the time spent in that 
department. Concerning these minor points we do 
not wish to speak but there are courses and very stiff 
ones at that, in the present college curriculum which | 
cannot be regarded as of any real value in the study 
of agriculture or its most distantly allied sciences. 
This is especially true of the sophomore course of 
four hours for the whole year in physics and mechan- 
ics. We do not for a moment cast a shade of reflec- 
tion upon the professors in charge. They are both 
gentlemen whose high standing in their profession 
cannot be questioned and having rendered excellent 
service in the past, they have a yet wider career 
before them. The college faculty would suffer a dis- 
tinct loss should either sever his connection with it. 
Nor can the methods of instruction be consistently 
criticised. As a purely theoretical course in elemen- 
tary physics we commend the sophomore course at 
M. A. C. in that subject. However there seems to 
be no cause for the existence of a study arranged in 
such a manner at an agricultural college and we have 
heard similar opinions expressed unofficially by mem- 
bers of our faculty whose judgment in such affairs we 
consider to be excellent. We would respectfully 
submit that if physics is to be taught at Mass'chusetts, 
it should be taught as the "physics of agriculture," 
not as "university physics." We are not aware of 
any existing course, required or elective, which gives 
detailed instruction in any of the vast number of 
physical phenomena which not only guide the des- 
tinies of agriculture but also determine the progress 
of the human race. Is it not permissible for us to ask 
for a little less of the theoretical and more of the 
practical, a minimum of the abstract and a maximum 
of the concrete ? 




Bowdoin is a backslider. The cut system has been 
abolished and the old system of ex cuses has been 
restored. An officer has been appointed with full 
power to pass on the validity of all excuses. 



As most of our readers doubtless know, the game 
with Rhode Island State college was cancelled because 
that team was badly used up and had no less than six 
men out of the game. The varsity squad was not 
allowed to rust during the week however and prepara- 
tions were carried on for the great game with Amherst. 
During the long succession of practice games several 
new features developed and some old ones became 
more prominent. The back field has not been quite 
right this season and to this is attributed the failure of 
strong offensive playing. There also seems to have 
been far too much fumbling at inopportune moments. 
During the last few davs several new men were taken 
off the class squads and tried out for the varsity and 
Turner has apparently made good for the position of 
end. As coach Murphy who spent three days here 
before the Amherst game declared we have no ideal 
football players on our team. Our backs are light 
and not very fast and all along the line we have not 
men naturally made up for football. We have had to 
depend this year season as in past seasons upon that 
indomitable spirit which has so many times brought 
victory to M. A. C. 

We must apologize for the late appearance of the 
account of the Dartmouth game but the length of the 
article on the president's inauguration necessitated 
postponing our correspondent's account of the contest 
at Hanover from the last issue. 

A few words concerning basketball are not out of 
place although Manager Philbrick has not yet got his 
schedule quite into shape for publication. There will 
be more big games played this year than ever before 
and several of these will take place in the drill hall. 
With the team of last year still in college it should 
not be difficult to carry through a good season since 
the financial situation in athletics has now cleared. 
It is to be hoped that the students will take a more 
aggressive attitude In favor of this sport during the 
winter. Heretofore the students have run across to 
the drill hall and watched the game from improvised 
perches on the side walls, dressed in ragged sweaters 
and old clothes generally. For the preservation of 
the good name of the college we should try to assume 
the same interest and appearance as when football or 
baseball games take place here. 



Dartmouth, 26; M. A. C, 0. 
Our game with Dartmouth on Oct. 20 resulted in 
a greater defeat for us than we have experienced this 
season. Our men were unable to gain much ground 
around Dartmouth's ends, and the forward pass 
although resorted to occasionally did not prove a 
strong play ; our line was almost powerless in attack- 
ing the vastly superior weight which opposed it. 

The game started by Glaze kicking off to Watkins, 
who ran the ball in 8 yards. On the next play Massa- 
chusetts lost the ball on a fumble. Dartmouth made 
two short gains and fumbled to Massachusetts. Cobb 
was forced to punt ; Kennedy took the ball and made 
a 30-yard run to our 17-yard line. Dartmouth pre- 
pared for a placement kick but a poor pass broke it 
up and they lost their distance. Cobb again punted. 
Glaze took the ball on his own 45-yard line and with 
excellent interference by Lang and Hobbs, went 
through the broken field for the first touchdown. 
Giaze kicked the goal. Watkins again received the 
kick off and made 20 yards. Massachusetts was 
unable to make her distance, Cobb's punt was blocked 
and the ball went to Dartmouth on a fumble. Bankart 
make 13 yards around the end and Stewart 10 through 
the line bringing the ball to our 20-yard line. From 
there, Glnze kicked a goal from placemeni. 

Hobbs kicked off to Watkins who rushed the ball 
18 yards. Cobb punted to Glaze who by clever dodg- 
ing carried the ball to our 15 yard line and then kicked 
another goal from placement. 

Bankart received the next kick off but was downed 
by Sexton before making any distance. Dartmouth 
was forced to punt, the ball was fumbled and went to 
them again. By line plunges Dartmouth twice gained 
their distance, and put Lang over the line for a touch- 
down. Glaze kicked the goal. After the next kick 
off by Cobb Stewart made 30 yards around the end. 
Dartmouth was held for downs and forced to punt. 
The half soon ended with the ball on our 45 yard line. 
In the second half, Dartmouth put in practically a 
new team , and was able to score but one touchdown. 
Both teams were forced to punt frequently. Tne for- 
ward pass was attempted often, but with one exception 
it was unsuccessful. Near the close of the half, 
Massachusetts lost the ball en her 16-yard line. By 
old fashioned football Dudley went over the line for a 
[touchdown. Brooks kicked the goal. The rest of 



40 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



4i 



the half was featureless and ended with the ball on 
Dartmouth's 35-yard line. 

Our team played a gritty game and as usual, stuck 
together and did their best to the finish but the odds 
which opposed them were too great to allow them to 
score. Cobb's punting far out-classed that of Glaze, 
and was a feature of the game. Watkins, Warner 
and Bartlett also did good work for Massachusetts. 
Glaze was the star man for Dartmouth, making a 60 
yeard run for a touchdown and kicking two goals from 
placement. 

The line-up : 

DARTMOUTH. MASSACHUSETTS. 

Kennedy, De Angelis. Richmond. 

Dreyfus. 1. e. r. e.. Bartlett 

Hobbs. Harlow. 1. t. r. t.. Sexton 

McDonald. Pevear. 1. g. r- g- Cutter 

Brusse. Dillingham, c. c.. Paige 

M. K. Smith. Toblin. r. g. 1. g.. Anderson. Summers 

Lang. C. W. Smith, r. t. 1- t.. Farley 

Pritchard. Stearns, Grebenstein, r. e. 

1. e.. Chapman. Alger, Turner 
Glaze. McDitt. Brooks. Knight, q. b q. b.. Cobb 

Bankart. Driver. Dudley. 1. h. b. r. h. b.. Watkins 

Stuart. Heneage. Steward, r. h. b. 1. h. b.. Warner 

Greenwood. Hathaway. Baldwin, f. b. f. b., Willis 

Score— Dartmouth 26. Massachusetts 0. Touchdowns. 
— Glaze. Lang. Dudley. Goals from touchdowns— Glaze 2. 
Brooks. Goals from fields— Glaze 2. Umpires— Carleton 
and Clough Referee— Lillard of Dartmouth. Linesmen. 
Bankart of Dartmouth and Chase of Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college. Timers— Gillette of Massachusetts and Bolser 
of Dartmouth. Time— 20-mmute halves. 

Amherst 12; M. A. C. 8. 
Last Saturday afternoon the long looked-forward-to 
game with Amherst took place. The largest crowd 
that Pratt Field will see this season was present to 
witness the contest. Our team gave an excellent 
exhibition of clean, open football, and the score by 
no means represents its strength compared with that 
of Amherst. When away from the goal lines, our 
men had everything their own way with Amherst's 
line, backs and ends, but were unable to score a 
touchdown although four times within a few yards of 
Amherst's goal. They were unable also to hold 
Amherst when on our 8-yard line. The forward pass 
was successfully tried several times, once netting us 
45 yards. 

Hubbard started the game by kicking to Watkins 
who ran the ball in 7 yards. In the next two plays, 



Willis gained 1 1 yards through the line. Amherst 
took a brace and forced Cobb to punt, the ball cleared 
the Amherst backs and rolled toward their goal line. 
Hubbard recovered the ball and by skillful interfer- 
ence by McCoy, circled the left of our line, making a 
95-yard run to a touchdown. He kicked the goal. 

Hubbard again kicked off, the ball crossing our 
goal line. Beech received Cobb's kick from the 25- 
yard line, and was downed by Warner before making 
any distance. Hubbard went through the line for 3 
yards, in the next play no gain was made and Hub- 
bard punted. Massachusetts was unable to gain her 
distance. Cobb prepared to punt, but a poor pass 
caused him to fumble the ball and it went to Amherst 
on our 16-yard line. Amherst was penalized 15 
yards for holding. Hubbard prepared to kick a goal 
from placement, a poor pass broke it up, and Beech 
attempted a quater-back run, Turner broke through 
and tackled him 15 yards behind the line. Hubbard 
then made a short kick and the ball went to Amherst 
on our 4-yard line. Atwood was put through the line 
for the second touchdown. Hubbard kicked the 
goal. 

Watkins received the next kick off and ran the ball 
in 20 yards. By line plunges and end runs, Massa- 
chusetts carried the ball down the field to Amherst's 
8-yard line, there Amherst held our team for downs. 
Hubbard punted to Cobb, our backs then made seve- 
ral good gains through the line, and worked the for- 
ward pass once. At the center of the field Cobb was 
obliged to punt. Conley made 1 1 yards through the 
line and Hubbard followed for 8 more. Time was 
then called with the ball on Massachusetts' 35-yard 
line. 

The second period opened by Cobb kicking to Con- 
ley who rushed the ball in 18 yards, three end plays 
and a line plunge brought Amherst 30 yards more. 
Massachusetts then held Amherst for downs, the ball 
changed sides three times, neither team being able 
to gain their distance. Hubbard then made a short 
kick, and the ball went to Massachusetts. Each of 
our backs made creditable gains through the line. 
Cobb made a forward pass to Bartlett who advanced 
45 yards before being downed. In the next two plays 
Amherst's line could not be broken, Cobb fell back 
and from the 38-yard line kicked a goal. 

Willis received the next kick off and advanced the 



ball 20 yards. A forward pass, two line plunges and 
an end run brought Massachusetts 26 yards nearer 
Amherst's goal. Cobb was then forced to punt. 
Amherst fumbled the ball, Sexton iook it and gained 
12 yards. Our backs steadily advanced to Amherst's 
20-yard line, there they were held and Cobb kicked 
a second goal from the field. 

Hubbard kicked to Watkins, Massachusetts was 
unable to gain ground and Cobb punted, the ball was 
fumbled and went to Cutter. Warner made 1 1 yards 
around the end, Watkins 4 through the line, Turner 
20 on a forward pass, and Watkins 8 more through 
the line ; again the line of blue took a brace and Cobb 
tried another goal, the kick was blocked, Amherst 
took the ball but was soon obliged to punt. The 
game ended with the ball in Amherst's territory. 

Although defeated by a small score, our men in 
every feature far out -played their worthy opponents. 
They put up a hard, plucky fight, and only the good 
luck of Hubbard in making the long run at the first of 
the game, brougnt them defeat. In the second half 
our team played a game that was almost beyond the 
expectations of its most loyal supporters. Coach 
O'Hearn, after the game said, " 1 never saw a team 
[go into the second half with a score 1 2 to against 
them and play the game these fellows played to day." 
Every man on the team played such a strong game 
jthat it is difficult to pick out " stars." The work of 
;the back-field was far better than it has been before 
Ithis season, and showed clearly the good effects of 
Mr. Murphy's coaching. Hubbard was Amherst's 
ipectacular player. 
The line-up : 

MHERST. MASSACHUSETTS. 

[eating. I.e. r. e. Bartlett 

ulry, Kilbourne. 1. t. '■ < •• S« ton 

mith 1 g. r.g. Cutter. Johnson 

-raves. Gildersleeve, c. c. Paige. Cutter 

sborn. r. g. l *" Anderson 

IcCoy. Mulry.r.t. 1. t.. Farley 

lough, r. e. '• e " Turncr 

each.q.b. q.b.. Cobb 

ubbard. lh.b. r.h.b.. Watkins 

onley. Wiggins, r. h. b. ' \\ W *T 

.twood. f. b. '■ b - Wllhs 

Score— Amherst 12. M. A. C. 8 Touchdowns-Hubbard, 
.twood. Goals trom touchdowns— Hubbard 2. Goals from 

eld-Cobb 2. Referee. Corbin of Yale. Umpire-Thomp- 



son of Georgetown. Linesman— Dr. Collins of Northamp- 
ton ; assistants-Crook of Amherst. '07 ; Whitaker of M. A. 
C, '05. Time— 25 and 20-minute halves. 



M. A. C. '10, 5; Holyoke High, 0. 

The freshmen played their first game with Holyoke 
High on Oct. 26 and won 5 to In a hard 
fought game. McGraw and Neilson excelled for the 
freshmen and F. Lynch for Holyoke. 

The line-up : 
m. a. c, MO "■ "• s - 

Neilson. r. e. 1. e.. Fitzgerald 

Leonard, r. t. >■ «•• Sibb,e 

Kelley. r. g. '• *•<<•'" 

Hazen. c. c ' Ballou 

Hastings. 1. g. '■ «" " "*™ 

Urban. 1. t. r. t.. j. Lynch 

L. Brown. 1. e. r. e, Baulin 

Chase. (Capt.) q.b. * *>■■ Gardner 

Blaney. r. h. b. 1. h. b., F. Lynch (Capt.) 

McGraw. 1. h. b. r - h " *>■• Shea 

Schermerhorn. f. b. f - b " Curle y 

Score-M. A. C..M0 5; H. H. S. 0. Touchdown-Blaney. 
Referee— Curley. Umpire — O'Donnell Timers - Burke 
and Reid. Head linesmen— Bartlett. Linesmen-Marson 
and Woodard. Time— 15-minute halves. 



Collet N°**S- 



A N\ Swain, '05, spent the week end in town. 

—The new proprietors of the college store are 
Chapman and Shattuck. both '08. 

_A. T. Hastings, '06, spent a few days in town 
last week, stopping over to see the Amherst game. 

—Mr. Murphy, a Brown graduate and coach, was 
secured to put the finishing touches on the team dur- 
ing the past week. 

—A week ago Saturday the Signal board had Its 
picture taken, this being the last group picture taken 
expressly for the 1908 Index. 

—The Horticultural Seminar held two weeks ago 
consisted of an exhibit of the fruit brought back from 
the recent Boston exhibition. 

—Paige who received a broken ankle during the 
latter part of the game Saturday has been very unfor- 
tunate this year and the college sympathizes with him 
in an injury which puts him out of the game for the 
rest of the season. 



«i 



42 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



43 



— Mark Shultis, of Boston has presented a book 
case and singing books to the college Young Men's 
Christian Association. The fifty books which he gave 
last year will be kept in this case. 

— The portion of the freshmen class which bolted 
Mr. Osman to have their pictures taken have had 
their cut privileges removed until Thanksgiving. 
This is a lenient punishment for such high handed 
action. 

— Owing to an act of the last legislature, the fiscal 
year of the college will hereafter end on Nov. 30. 
This will necessitate the calling of the annual meet- 
ing of the trustees earlier. It is scheduled for Dec. 
20 this year. 

— Charles H. White has been elected editor-in- 
chief of the 1909 Index and Robert D. Lull is busi- 
ness manager. The other appointments have been 
filled by a literary competition but the results have 
not yet been announced. 

— The meetings of the American Association of 
of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations will 
be held Nov. 12, at Baton Rouge, La. President 
Butterfield, Professor Brooks and Professor Waugh 
are to attend the meetings. 

— The college Young Men's Christian Association 
plans to establish a Bible institute within the next few 
days. An organization into classes is contemplated 
and a systematic study of the scriptures will be made 
under the guidance of competent instuctors. 

— The senate has made a new and commendable 
ruling to the effect that beginning with the class of 
1910 all class sweaters must be plain maroon with 
white numerals. This ruling is made that the sweat- 
ers appearing on athletic trips and student gatherings 
shall be uniform in color. 

— The Springfield Republican is authority for the 
statement that the college saves 20 cents a ton on all 
freight hauled since the spur track was built by the 
electric road allowing freight cars to be unloaded at 
the experiment station. About $200 a year is thus 
saved in transporting coal alone and this will be doubled 
when the track is extended to the college power house. 

— A new interpretation of the cut system has been 
made by the botanical department. Hereafter no 
one will be allowed to cut a laboratory exercise with- 



out sufficient excuse and no opportunity will be offered 
to make up time thus lost. Dr. Stone explains that 
this move has been necessitated by the excessive 
number of cuts taken by the underclassmen. 

— The last Seminar consisted of a very interesting 
talk given by Professor Waugh on the native Southern 
persimmon and on its improved strain. The class 
then passed judgment on the flavor of this interesting 
fruit. E. G. Bartlett then followed with a talk on the 
parks he had visited this summer, giving the class 
several suggestions from a landscape gardener's point 
of view. 

— The last two Y. M. C. A. meetings were both 
very interesting though led by different persons. 
Professor Charles H. Fernald conducted the one held 
on Oct. 25 and gave a few of his many experiences 
on both land and water. Last week's speaker was C. 
W. Hamilton, Andover's quarterback, who presented 
some good ideas in a very interesting manner. 
George R. Cobb sang a solo. 

— A trip to Mt. Hermon and East Northfield school 
was taken last Wednesday by Secretary Butterfield 
of Detroit and a delegation from the college. The 
two institutions were inspected under the guidance of 
H. F. Tompson, M. A. C. 1905, and A. A. Newton. 
At each place the teaching department and the farms 
were visited. Dinner was taken at Mt. Hermon din- 
ing Hall where a good portion of the faculty and four 
hundred students were the hosts. The visitors were 
much impressed by the fine appearance, the excellent 
work, and the genuine enthusiasm everywhere mani- 
fest. The bonds of mutual interest between Mt. 
Hermon and M. A. C. are gradually strengthening, in 
no small degree the work of the two institutions is 
correlated and the future will doubtless bring a 
cooperation between them which will be productive of 
grand results. 



NEW FRATERNITY RULES. 

The fraternity conference has made the following 
tules concerning the '-rushing" of freshmen for the 
various societies in college : 

(\\ No candidate for fraternity membership shall 
,e spoken to, nor shown literature pertaining to nor 
approached in any manner whatsoever in regard to 
fraternities or fraternity membership until after the 
:hapel exercises on the first Monday of the second 
semester. 

(2) No candidate for fraternity membership shall 
3 e spoken to nor shown literature pertaining to nor 
approached in any manner whatsoever regarding fra- 
ternities or fraternity membership from 6 p . m. on 

■hursday of the same week until after chapel of the 
hollowing morning. 

(3) The wearing of a fraternity pin or pledge by a 
candidate shall signify that the wearer is P^to 
that fraternity and the pin or pledge emblenn shall be 
voluntarily put on by the candidate himself durmg the 
chapel exercises of the following morning. No verbal 
or written promise shall be valid. 

(4) No candidate shall be taken out of town dur- 
lingthe above mentioned "working season' and no 
fraternity man shall associate with such cand.date 
while out of town during the aforesaid season. 

(5) No spread, banquet or entertainment shall be 
[given to a candidate by any fraternity or group of fra- 
ternity men during the "working season and I no fra- 
ternity or group of fraternity men shall give a banquet 
prior to the working season. 

(6) If a candidate is not pledged at this time he 
is not eligible for membership to any fraternity until 

| June 1 of the same year, except by special arrange- 
ment of the fraternity conference. 



of the editors of the Economic History of the United 
States which is being prepared under the auspices of 
the Carnegie institute, at Washington. Finally on 
Dec 1 , President Butterfield will deliver an address 
before the Massachusetts teachers' association at 
Boston and expects to return to college on Dec. 3. 



Because he did not feel inclined to contribute to 
the sophomores' amusement, Joe Buchan of Theresa, 
Wis., held 200 sophomores of a Milwaukee college 
at bay with a revolver and dagger. Buchan was in 
his room when the sophomores arrived. He informed 
them there would be a funeral or two if they tried to 
take him by force. The sophomores thought dis- 
cretion the better part of valor and retreated. 



PRESIDENT BUTTERFIELD'S TRIP. 

President and Mrs. Butterfield leave the latter part 
of this week for an extended trip In the South and 
I West. President Butterfield will attend the annual 
meeting of the association of American agricultural 
colleges and experiment stations at Baton Rouge, La. 
! He will report as the chairman of the committee on 
(extension work in agriculture. Professors Brooks 
and Waugh will also be present. The president will 
I also attend the meeting of the American association 
of farmers' institute workers, which Is held at the 
same time and place. From Louisiana Mr. Butter- 
field and family, will visit in Michigan where the 
latter will remain until the middle of December. On 
Nov. 30 the president will be present at the meeting 



THE AUTOCRAT AT THE GAME. 

The Amherst game is over. Long before the 
pages of the S.cnal are opened by its readers the 
exhilarating scrimmage, the spectacular playing of 
the great Hubbard, the less pyrotechnic but consist- 
ent work of our own team, the fair spectators, the 
cheering and the singing, all will have commenced to 
blend into the traditionary but not forgotten past. 
Amherst has the figures of the victory but to quote 
the Sprigfield Republican they "barely won out and 
it seems to be an unquestionable fact that, with the 
exception of one player, on the down-town eleven 
ours was the better team. The detailed account of 
the game will be found In the sporting column It 
remains for the Autocrat to comment upon the fea- 
tures seen on the side lines. 

The Autocrat has endeavored to recall the game 
played in his freshman year and to compare the sp.nt 
of that day with that of the recent occasion but it is 
hard to span a space of three years. It is certain, 
however, that never since Nov. 14, 1903, has the 
spirit of Massachusetts reached such a high-water 
mark The mass- meetings of the last two weeks 
hav- drowned out the last feelings of individuality and 
converted everyone into a concrete unit of the college. 
Such however is expected of us. The townspeople 
last Saturday waited expectantly until the long column 
of squads filed up through the town on its way to col- 
lege Their cheers and hand -clappings showed that 
now* ever they are with us. The Autocrat was 
pleased to note a vast improvement in the spirit 
between the two colleges since the last footbal con- 
test As long as the two institutions are located in 
the "same town it seems useless to maintain a rivalry 
which is really an enmity and the Autocrat trusts hat 
the beginning of an ■ 'era of good feeling" .s at hand. 
The Autocrat is pleased to congratulate the large 
number of alumni and former students who were 
present. He feels that when one-fifth of the tota 
number of graduates is on hand it is indicative of 




44 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



excellent spirit. The arduous duties of the two cheer 
leaders, Messrs. Bartlett and Shattuck should not be 
forgotten at this time. 

From all of this the Autocrat draws a moral. For 
the remainder of the football season cheering and 
singing should be continued in anticipation of the 
wind-up at Springfield on Nov. 17. After football is 
over this enthusiastic regard for Massachusetts should 
not be suffered to wane. Let us during the year 
have an occasional mass-meeting to break the mon- 
otony of the winter months and to inculcate in the 
hearts of all the idea that in everything, athletic or 
otherwise— "Old Bay State must win." 



Dtp&rtmf rvf (Sloths. 

AGRICULTURE. 
Senior dairy practice commenced last Saturday, 
Nov. 3. This year Edward Gaskell, '06 has charge 
of the separator room, and E. S. Fulton, '04, has 
charge of the Babcock Test. A new man, Earl 
Brlntnawll, from the Iowa State university, has charge 
of the buttermaking. There are seven men in the 
senior class who have elected to take the dairy course. 
It will necessitate their being absent from drill until 
the Christmas vacation. The appearance of the dairy 
room has been somewhat improved by paint this fall. 
Until the hoped for day when we have an Agricul- 
tural building, the dairy practice will probably have 
to be carried on in the present cramped quarters in 
the basement of South College. The milk house 
connected with the new barn will not be used for stu- 
dent practice. 

Work on the new barn is coming on as rapidly as 
can be expected considering the scarcity of labor. 
The roof has been boarded, preparatory to slating it. 
The concrete block construction of the main barn 
and siloes is finished and that of the cow barn, nearly 
so. The planks for the floors have not yet been 
laid. The placing of the siloes outside the main 
barn will give the barn a greater capacity for the 
storage of hay. The corn cutter will occupy about 
the same relative position as formerly, and the car- 
rier will extend from the roof of the barn to the roof of 
the silo. 

The south wall of the barn is to support a manure 
trolley. The herd of sixteen cows is at present 



housed in the sheep shed, north of the barn, and wi 
remain there this winter. 

Owing to the mass meetings on Tuesday Oct. 30 
the Stockbridge club did not hold its regular session 
Last night Mr. Canning spoke on topics of interest tc 
the students. At the meeting Nov. 13, C. H. Pad- 
dock, '09, will have for his subject Shropshire Sheep 

The junior division will not take their trip for the 
study of soil formation until next spring. Unless help 
can be obtained for the digging of ditches, the drain 
age of the field, south of the pond, will not be 
attempted this fall. 

BIOLOGY. 

The Biological club has been organized with J. A. 
Hyslop as president. H. C. Chase was chosen vice- 
president and C. C. Gowdey, secretary. Meetings 
will be held the last Friday in each month. Papers 
will be read and discussed and reports of biologica. 
literatare will be made. Dr. Gordon has kindly 
offered the tie use of his home as a meeting place. 
BOTANY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

Professor Brooks was in Buriington, Vt. last Friday 
The trip was made in the interests of the Experiment 
Station admi nistration. 

It has been hard to get masons for work on Clark 
hall. The appropriation of $45,000 provides for 
interior finish and heating, but not for furnishings and 
floors. Cement floors are being considered. The 
finish is to be of ash, with flemish oak stain. 

The September issue of Washington Experiment 
Station Record contained an interesting article by Dr. 
E. Walker, '85. He emphasizes the need of more 
advanced training, in order to fill the requirements 
of the Adams bill. This bill provides money for 
purely scientific investigation. The experiment sta 
tions in their efforts to help the farmer have over- 
looked this deeper side of the work. The bill was 
passed the latter part of June, 1906, and the stations 
in each state are to receive $7,000 this year. For 
the next four years the appropriation will be $9,000 
annually, and $15,000 thereafter. Its expenditure 
will be under the direction of the Washington Exper- 
iment Station. 

CHEMISTRY. 
The Kemical Klub of former years has been 
revived under the name of the Chemical Club. It 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



45 



is proposed to hold bi-weekly meetings and to treat 
chemical subjects in a popular manner. The increased 
interest in the club is due, in part at least, to the larger 
number of students taking the course. The follow- 
ing officers have been elected for this college year : 
President, G. H. Chapman; vice-president, W. E. 
Dickinson; secretary, L. W. Chapman; treasurer, 
Carlton Bates. Those wishing to become members 
should see Warner, '08. 

The Allowing are some of the subjects to be con- 
sidered, and outside speakers may be obtained from 
time to time : 
E. T. Lacd, '05, Methods for the Determination of 

Chlor'de in the presence of Phosphates. 
L. S. Walker, '05, Problems in Fodder Analysis. 
C. G. Barnjm, Middlebury '05, The Chemistry of 

the An.mal Digestions. 
G. H. Chapman, '07, W. H. Perkin's Work in 

Colors. 
W. E. Dickinson, '07, Milk and Butter Inspection. 
B. W. Bangs, '08, Problems in Glass Manufacture. 
Carlton Bates. '08, Leather Manufacture. 
L. W. Chapman, '08, The Commercial Product. 
R. E. Cutting, '08, Recent Work in the Chemistry 

and Technology of Nitrogen. 
R. H. Jackson, '08, Improvements in Agricultural 
Chemical Analysis. 

HORTICULTURE. 
Professor Waugh received some very fine persim- 
ons from Florida and the seniors were given a teed at 
their seminar. Some of the fruit was used by the 
class in pomology. 

The garden crops are now practically all off the 
fields. The celery crop throughout the state has 
been poor this year, but the yield on the horticultural 
plots was first rate. A clogged tile drain caused 
some damage to the crops. The bulk of the celery 
will be disposed of in town. 

The dwarf orchard has grown very well this sum- 
mer. Many out of town men have called to look at 
it. Nursery men have been surprised at the growing 
demand for dwarf trees and have been unable to fill 
all their orders. 

Although several men have been considered to fill 
the vacancy caused by the resgnatlon of Mr. Blake, 
no one has as yet been chosen. 



The fall cleaning up of the grounds is taking place 
and the greenhouses are being made tight for the 
winter. The water plants which grew in the basin of 
the fountain in front of the Botanical Museum have 
been placed in the greenhouse. 

The laying of pipes for the heating of Clark hall, has 
prevented the grading and seeding down of the slope 
west of Wilder hall. 

MATHEMATICS. 
Professor Ostrander has obtained a Fairbanks' 
Cement Testing macnine, new model, having a 
1 ,000 pound capacity. It is to be used by the class 

in engineering. 

The weather report for October, shows that the 
mean temperature in this section has been nearly 
normal. The total precipitation was sixty per cent 
greater than the average. 



Alumni. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

Copies of the college song "Sons of Old Mass'chu- 
setts " may be secured by sending twenty-five cents 
to W. F. Chace, M. A. C, Amherst. Every 
alumnus should have a copy of this song, learn It, 
and be ready to sing it for their Alma Mater at the 
alumni gatherings held during the year. 
CLASS OF 1905. 
The class letters spoken of in the recent issue of 
the Signal are coming in so very slowly that the 
undersigned is going to wait another month before 
sending them out. If you want a copy of the letter, 
please send yours to 48 Winter Street, Boston, 
today ; tomorrow you may have forgotten. 

C. L. Whitaker. 

'9I._M. A. Carpenter is in charge of the For- 
estry and Landscape Gardening on a large estate in 
Rh.nebeck, N. Y. Address R. F. D. Route No. 
50, Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

'95 _W. L. Morse has been appointed Resident 
Engineer of the Grand Central Terminal Improvement 
by the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 

Company. 

'95.— The Home Culture clubs of Northampton, 
H. D. Hemenway, secretary, are offering a course of 
Nature Study Tramps on Saturday afternoons. The 






46 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



47 




I L 



following are some of the subjects that will be treated : 
Phylotaxy and Winter Sleep, Foundations, Fruits and 
Nuts, Evergreens, The Tree, The Forest, Forest 
Pests, Arboriculture, Leaf Functions. The plan 
promises to prove very successful. 

'96.— Dr. and Mrs. I. C. Poole are receiving con- 
gratulations upon the birth of a daughter on Oct. 25, 
at Fall River. 

'97.— At Palo Alto, Cal., Oct. 22, an eight and 
one-half pound daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. C. 
F. Palmer, 765 Channing Avenue. 

'01. — Two interesting bulletins have recently been 
received from Ralph 1. Smith of Atlanta, Ga., one 
an annual report, together with the "Pest Laws of 
G^or^ia;" the other in reference to the San Jose 
scale. 

'03.— The marriage of Stephen C. Bacon and 
Miss Mertie May Young took place Nov. I , 
at the Congregational church in Sunderland. After 
their wedding trip, Mr. and Mrs. Bacon will reside at 
515 West 135th St., New York city. 

NINETEEN-FOUR. 

M. F. Ahearn, Manhattan, Kan., Foreman of 
Greenhouse, K. S. A. C. 

E. A. Back, Phillips Avenue, Amherst, Graduate 
Student, M. A. C. 

M. A. Blake, Amherst, Instructor in Horticulture, 
M. A. C. ; after Dec. 1, Horticulturist, N. J. Exper- 
iment Station, New Brunswick, N. J. 

F. D. Couden, 1310 Columbia Road, N. W. , 
Washington, D. C, U. S. Dept. Agriculture, 
Bureau of Entomology. 

C. F. Elwood, Greens Farms, Conn., General 
Farming and Fruit Growing. 

E.S.Fulton, Amherst, Assistant Agriculturist, Hatch 
Experiment station. 

A. W. Gilbert, M. S., Assistant Professor of 
Agronomy and Supervisor of the University Extension 
courses, University of Maine. 

J. W. Gregg, Landscape Gardener, Arbor Lodge, 
Nebraska City, Nebraska. 

C. H. Griffin, Student, George Washington Uni- 
versity College of Medicine. Washington, D. C. 

S. B. Haskell, Amherst, Instructor in Agriculture, 
M. A. C. 



F. F. Henshaw, Washington, D. C, U. S. Geo- 
logical Survey. Stream Gaging Work. 

Z. T. Hubert, Spelman Seminary, Atlanta, Ga., 
Supt. of the Plant, Grounds, Buildings, etc. 

H. D. Newton, 117 Wall St., New Haven, Conn. 
Graduate Student, Yale University. 

G. E. O'Hearn, Pittsfield, Coach M. A. C. Foot- 
ball Team, Amherst. 

S. R. Parker, Agriculturist, Kamehameha Schools, 
Honolulu, H. I. 

A. L. Peck, Supt. Canadian Nursery Co. Ltd., 
Pointe Claire, P. Q., Canada. 

R. A. Quigley, 20 Bartlett St., Brockton, Student, 
Harvard Medical College. 

R. R. Raymoth, Landscape Architect, Evans- 
ville, Ind. 

P. F. Staples, Woodbine, N. J. , Horticulturist, 
Baron de Hirsch Agricultural and Indusfial School. 

H. M. Wnite, 1206 K St., N. W., Washington, 
D. C, Division of Pomology, U.S. Dept. Agriculture. 

'05.— R. L. Adams and F. L. Yeaw have gone to 
California in the Interests of Professor Smith. 

'05. — G. H. Allen is spending a few weeks in the 
North. He is superintendent of a large orange plan- 
tation in Florida. 

'05.— A. N. Swain, who is in New York the 
greater part of the time, visited college recently. 

'05. — Miss M. L. Sanborn is managing her farm 
in East Braintree, Vt., in a very encouraging manner. 

'05. — H. F. Tompson of Mount Hermon spent a 
day around college recently. 

NINETEEN- SIX. 

William H. Craighead has gone into the rents, 
loans and Investments business. Address 427 State 
St.. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Harry B. Filer has formed a company with W. 0. 
Taft and is practising forestry, entomology and land- 
scape work, and he also holds the position of City 
Forester of Newark, N. J. Address P. 0. Box 382, 
Newark, N.J. 

G. Talbot French is assistant botanist at the New 
York Agricultural Experiment station, Geneva, N. Y. 

Edwin F. Gaskill is assistant at the Hatch Experi- 
ment station. 



Arthur W. Hall, North Amherst. 

Addison T. Hastings, Jr., is engaged in City 
Forestry work, Newark, N. J. He found time to 
visit the college the past week, being present at the 

Amherst game. 

Frank H. Kennedy, meat inspection work, 1 1 

Beale St., Ashmont. 

James E. Martin, post-graduate student, Yale 
Forestry school, New Haven, Conn. 

Louis H. Moseley, farmer, Glastonbury, Conn. 

Everett P. Mudge, gardener on the Waveny Farm, 
New Canaan, Conn. 

Ralph W. Peakes, graduate student in chemistry 
at Harvard, 7 Walnut St., Newtonville. 

Fry C. Pray on Dec. 1, takes the position of assist- 
ant sugar chemist at Cienfuegos, Cuba. Address 10 
Concord St., Natick. 

Stanley S. Rogers, assistant botanist at the Cali- 
fornia Experiment station. 

Henry M. Russell, graduate student at M. A. C, 

Amherst. 

Edwin H. Scott, principal of Petersham High 
school, Petersham. Mr. Scott visited college for a 
few days recently and procured a collection of seeds 
to be used in his class work at the school. He is 
engaged in a very interesting and important work, as 
the experiment is being tried of making it largely an 
agricultural high school, agriculture, and allied sub- 
jects receiving considerable prominence. Nature 
study is also being taught in the lower grades of the 
Petersham schools, under Mr. Scott's supervision. 

George W. Sleeper is with the New Castle Leather 
Co., Boston. Address 42 Walker Road, Swampscott. 
Benjamin Strain, engineering department, N. Y., 
N. H. &. H. R. R., New Haven, Conn. 

Herman A. Suhlke is sugar chemist atCaro, Mich., 
with the Peninsular Sugar Refining Co. of Detroit. 
William O. Taft, Taft-Filer Co., Newark, N. J. 
Charles A. Tirrell, 1715 Railway Exchange, Chi- 
cago, 111. Representing Howard Evarts Weed, 
landscape architect. M. F. Wholley is also in the 
employ of Mr. Weed. 

Willard C. Tannatt, Jr., is a graduate student at 
Yale university in the Geological department. 

Richard Wellington, assistant horticulturist at the 



Geo. F. Vester, Jr. 



TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 



485 Main Street, • SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 



|. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dyin^Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing. 



All order* promptly attended to. 
Drop me a po»tal and I will call on you. 
run I>re.H Suit, tl rent _^8tudent.. Clotu. bougbt. 

7 Pleasant Street, Amhekst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 

latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 

best in the market. 






NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



48 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



New York Agricultural Experiment station, Geneva 
N. Y. 

A. H. M. Wood, farmer, Easton. Since Oct. 1, 
Mr. Wood has been experimenting on tuberculosis 
for Prof. Theobald Smith of Harvard, at Framing- 
ham, following out the Von Behrlng theory. 

Ex- '06.— Earl W. Keith who was for a short time 
a member of '06, died suddenly at his home in North 
Easton recently. After leaving M. A. C. he studied 
law at Boston university and was, at the time of his 
death, working in a law office in Taunton. 



THE CO-OP. 

A complete line of W. H.GOWDY 

CO. FURNISHINGS. 

Represent KAISER, the College 

Tailor of New Haven. 



A IX) 



THE HENRY H. TUTTLE CO., 
Shoes, of Bcston. 

GREENHOUSES -THEIR _ 

PRACTICAL SIDE . . . 

Not only glass enclosed gardens, 
but thoroughly practical working prop- 
ositions where every sort of plant can 
be grown— experiments successfully 
made — profits secured. We build for 
the amateur, the private Mtate, the 
growers— Kvery sort of greenhouse 
proposition from cold frames to palm 
houses. 
Send for Catalog. 

Lord & Buroham Co, 

Greennouse Designers 
aqd manufacturers. 

1133 Broadway, cor. 26th St., N. Y. 

Boston Bbabch, 819 Tremont Building. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

BOLTOKI, MASS 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAPE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. ROWKKR & CO. 



THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 

Most Attractive Cafe in New England. 

Private Dining ,{,„„„* for Lulies and Theatre Parties. 

Class ami Fraternity BasqtwU a specialty. 

Try our Special Sunday Dinners, 5 p. m. to 8.30 p. m., 50c. 

When in town K ive us a trial and be convinced. 

Open until mldni«lit. 

EDWARD A. LEWIS, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - . Holvoke, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



NOTICE. 



All 15c. brands of Cigarettes 
2 for 25c. at 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 1 1 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



,0L. XVII. 



TMHERST71^sTr~NOVEMBER 21. 1906 



NO. 5 



-^Ush^^h^Vs-dents o, the Massachusetts A^ural CoU.^ ^ ^ ^ 

s^andA^isr.^^,^^ 

.„« to all subscriber, until tta discontmuanc. it ordered and WW » P» 

itify the Bu»ine»» Manager 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 
RALPH JEROME WATTS. 1907. Business Manager 

^ROBERT PARKER, ^^^^^ BARTLE TT. ,907. 
LrTHUR WILLIAM H1GGINS. 1907, Alumni Notes. £DWlN DAN1ELS PH 1LBR1CK. 1908. 

llOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes. DANA FARRAR . |o 8. 

DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908. Deprtment^ Note,. QRWELL BURLTON BR.CCS. 1909. 

GEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR.. 1909. 



— m amtMM o.teid. .» United SUt»« «nd Canada. M c. a«tra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot -Ball Association. 

I College Senate. 
Reading- Room Association, 
Basket-ball Association. 



C. H. White. Pres. 
M. H. Clark. Jr.. Manager. 
F. C. Peters, Pres. 
J.N. Summers. Sec. 
H. T. Pierce. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

Base- Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Indei. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec 
T. A. Barry, Managei. 
K. E. Gillett. Managei. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
E. G Bartlett, Manager. 



Er,< e r,d as second-cUM matter. Post Off.ce a. Amhers. 




The loss of the. financial assistance given by the 
college for the making up of a deficit in the informal* 
is to be regretted. These dances have become a 
strong feature of the college life not only with our own 
students but also with those across the mountam and 
river It is to be feared that the uncertainty of the 
expense will militiate greatly against their success this 
year Every one should come out and support the 
fraternity conference so that these interesting breaks 
in the monotony of the winter months shall continue 
with their usual frequency and success. 



On another page Is a letter in which the writer 
declares that the schedule of the football team for the 
past season was too hard. He suggests that some of 
the smaller colleges should be played earlier in the 
season in order to toughen up the squad for bigger 
games coming toward the end. There can be ittle 
question but that his ideas are correct. While it 



may be an honor to be allowed to play a practice 
game with a big college or university the feeling Is 
strong among the students that everything should not 
be sacrificed to this end. We know not what the 
financial aspects of a change in system would be but 
certainly a repetition of a season where, for the most 
excellent of reasons, the football team lost so many 
games is liable to hurt the athletic association greatly. 
It is not an element of human nature to support a los- 
ing side with much loyalty and all the speech-making 
in the world cannot change matters. We certainly 
hope for the welfare of football and the honor of the 
college that the changes recommended by the corre- 
spondent above mentioned will be considered in the 
making up of future schedules. 



The speech made last week at Baton Rouge by 
Prof Frank W. Rane, the new state forester, has 
attracted the attention of all who have even a passing 
interest in the economic features of forestry. It is of 
especial importance to M. A. C. students because 
many of them are likely to meet such problems in 



, 



5<> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



5* 



their future work and also because of the fact that 
Professor Rane is the new lecturer on forestry at the 
college. Last year the forestry course was given in 
about a dozen lectures at which the attendance of all 
seniors and juniors was required. Field work was 
optional for the students. For some reason or 
another the course was not especially satisfactory 
from a student point of view. The gathering of such 
a large class many of whom had no interest whatso- 
ever in the subject was unfortunate and was not con- 
ducive to the best results. The year before we 
believe that the course was wholly elective and that 
the entire class dropped It after a few lectures. Man- 
ifestly some change is necessary if this course of lec- 
tures established by legislative enactment is to be of 
any practical utility to the students of the college. 



The enthusiasm and exuberant college spirit which 
appeared during the week preceding the Amherst 
game was highly commendable. Such a glorious 
"outbreak" naturally leads one to look optimistically 
Into the future and to theorize upon matters concern- 
ing the welfare of old Mass'chusetts. Now that the 
contest for which this spirit was generated is past we 
are in danger of sliding back into the routine of every- 
day life. It sometimes seems as if we need an event 
In the course of the year which shall keep up our 
Interest in the college life. A former editorial in the 
Signal suggested a day especially reserved for such 
purposes and entitled either Massachusetts day, 
Alumni day or some other equally fitting name. 
Upon such an occasion prominent members of the 
alumni would speak to the students, the band would 
play and songs be sung. This Idea Is not new and 
has been in force at various institutions with modifi- 
cations. It seems as if it would be worth while to 
consider the setting aside of at least part of one day 
In the year for the laudable purpose of creating and 
maintaining college loyalty. 



abiding strictly by the spirit as well as the letter of the 
new regulations there can be little chance for jealousy 
The fraternity conference is to be congratulates 
on the evolution of this new code of "frat-rushin» 
rules." In this connection we wish to reiterate th« 
words of the president of the conference when explain 
ing the new enactments to the freshman class. Any 
one who contemplates the joining of a society shoul: 
acquaint himself so far as possible with the members 
and learn the status of the fraternity before commit 
ting himself. After all any organization is as are its 
members. Valuable as the past history of a frat. 
may be and important as are its alumni representa- 
tives at the last analysis the present members are 
those with whom the newcomer must associate. We 
cannot impress too strongly the idea that no one 
should join a fraternity on the spur of a hasty thought 
or without a just consideration of the other societies. 
The whole of one's college life, and sometimes after- 
life as well, rests upon that choice made the Friday 
morning following the first Monday of the second 
semester. 



In the last Signal were printed the rules recently 
adopted by the four fraternities in regard to securing 
new members. There can be no doubt that they 
are a vast improvement over the old ones which were 
so indefinite and capable of so many interpretations 
as to be almost useless. With the various societies 



In the Signal for Nov. 7 there appeared an edi- 
torial which made a few comments upon the sopho- 
more course In physics. Since its publication at 
least two of the alumni have written letters of remon- 
strance and it is probable that there are others who 
have refrained from an expression of opinion but who 
were not favorably Impressed by the mentioned 
article. It should be first understood that the editor- 
ial was not, as has been inferred, an unsupported 
expression of opinion. It embodied the endless criti- 
cism and fault-finding which we hear every day about 
college. Many of those who have passed a Rubicon 
of this sort are pleased to look back and say what a 
good thing It was in much the same way that an 
upper classman declares hazing to be a great blessing. 
Their position is so inconsistent as to be untenable. 
We believe that many of our readers entirely mis- 
understood our intentions, however. One of the cor- 
respondents above mentioned apparently considers 
that we are condemning all of those subjects which do 
not immediately concern agriculture. Such a posi- 
tion would hardly be assumed by any sane person. 
The Massachusetts agricultural college would be 
indeed limited in scope if such was its policy. What 



we did wish to express was that there are a few 
courses in the curriculum which are so remotely 
connected with the future work of most students that 
they should be relegated to the electives. This 
seems especially true of physics for few specialize in 
any kind of work connected with that science. We 
would not protest against a course in elementary 
physics so prepared as to serve as an Introduction to 
the junior work but the present course Is so diffuse, 
theoretical and stiff as to only serve as a stumbling- 
block to those "who seek and climb." It Is an open 
question whether or not there are other subjects 
which might well be substituted in the effort to turn 
out a well-educated man at the end of the four years' 
course. We believe that in the words of a learned 
and far-sighted man : "Physics as now taught at M. 
A. C. is of little practical utility to the average stu- 
dent." If our readers believe otherwise they are, at 
least, entitled to a difference of opinion. 




The whistle has blown for the last time and the 
football season for 1906 Is over. This is not the 
place for a review of the season but certain features 
seem to need comment. It is very evident that a 
time has come to put on the brakes and to cease fur- 
nishing practice games for any large college or univer- 
sity which may ask for them. At the same time it 
is even plainer that the schedule must not be made 
up entirely of minor games. Another peculiar fact 
has appeared. The team seems absolutely unable to 
put up a good game when the student-body Is not on 
hand to furnish lots of cheering and singing. Such 
being the case it is quite essential that those having 
these matters in charge should be alive to their duty 
all the time. With the loss of only two players by 
graduation next June we should be able to develop a 
good team for the season of 1907. 

Interest Is beginning to drift toward basketball 
affairs and although the schedule is not yet available 
we are promised an interesting one with many home 
games. Having lost no regular players last year the 
prospects are certainly bright since there is promising 
material in the freshman class. 



Tufts, 28; Massachusetts, 0. 
Saturday, Nov. 10, Tufts defeated Massachusetts 
in a somewhat one-sided game of football. Tufts had 
a heavy, fast team which put up a game filled with 
various plays not practiced by other teams ; split-line 
plays, delayed passes, fake kicks, and combinations 
of these kept our men continually "guessing" and 
won for Tufts great distances which otherwise would 
have come hard. The absence of Watkins and 
Paige from our team represented a loss which is diffi- 
cult to estimate. 

Warner received the first kick-off and carried the 
ball In 20 yards. Cobb was soon forced to punt and 
Tufts by a series of hard line plunges and end runs, 
carried the ball 65 yards down the field, crossing our 
goal line before three minutes of time had elapsed. 
Green kicked off to French who advanced 24 yards ; 
Willis and French each made good gains through 
Tufts line, but Cobb was forced to punt ; Tufts was 
held for downs, and Jones booted the ball over our 
line, Peterson received Cobb's kick from the 25 yard 
line', and made 18 yards before being downed. Tufts 
punted again, and our backs pounded the line until 
they had advanced about 40 yards ; there they were 
held and Cobb kicked to Green. Two end runs and 
a line play put Peterson over for another touchdown. 
After the next kick off, Warner gained 18 yards 
around the end and Willis followed with 4 yards 
through the line ; an unsuccessful forward pass lost 
the ball to Tufts vho In a short time carried It across 
our line; Green failed to kick the goal. Our team 
then took a brace and played a hard game during the 
remainder of the half ; both teams were forced to 
punt frequently. At the center of the field, Farley 
broke through the line and blocked Jones' punt, the 
ball going to Massachusetts ; four line rushes together 
with 15 yards forfeited by Tufts for holding brought 
the ball within 23 yards of Tufts' goal; time was 
called with the ball in this position. 

The second half opened by Cobb kicking to Sulli- 
van who advanced the ball five yards. Tufts made 
18 yards more, but by an unsuccessful forward pass, 
lost the ball on their 30 yard line ; Warner and Willis 
each made six yards through the line and Cobb 
attempted a goal from the field, but failed to make 
it The ball changed sides several times, but our 






5> 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



53 



team gradually worked its way down to Tufts 30 yard 
line where Cobb missed another goal from the field. 
Massachusetts soon lost the ball on a forward pass and 
Tufts easily made the distance to our goal line, Peter- 
son carrying the ball over for the fourth touchdown. 
Soon after the next kick off Massachusetts lost the 
ball in an on-side kick and by a series of line plunges 
Lewis scored again for Tufts ; Green did not kick the 
goal. The rest of the game was featureless and 
ended with the ball in Tufts' territory. At halfback, 
French played an exceptionally strong game, consid- 
ering the fact that this was his first gam3 of the sea- 
son ; Farley, Barry, and Bartlett also did good work 
for Massachusetts. Sheehy and Peterson showed up 
especially well for Tufts. 
The line-up : 



TUFTS. 

Hubbard. 1. e. 
Marr. I. t. 
Sullivan. 1. g. 
Reynolds, c. 
Cronin. Burt. r. g. 
Chase. Houston, r. t. 
Hooper. Stevens, r. e. 
Green, q. b. 
Jones. Wallace, r. h b. 
Sheehy, r. h. b. 
Peterson. Lewis, f. b. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. e.. Bartlett 

r. t.. Sexton 

r. g., Jjhnson, Crosby 

C Cutter 

1. g.. Anderson. Summers 

1. t., Farley 

1. e.. Turner, Barry 

q. b.. Cobb 

r. h. b.. French 

1. h. b.. Warner. Schermerhorn 

f. b., Willis 



Score — Tufts, 28; Massachusetts. 0. Touchdowns — 
Petersen 8, Sheehy, Lewis. Goals from touchdowns— Green 
3. Referee — Brown of B. A. A. Umpire— Washburn of 
Amherst. Head linesman— Quigley. Time— 25 minute 
halves. 

Massachusetts, 21 ; Springfield T. S., 4. 

The score, Massachusetts 21 , Springfield training 
school 4, is a fair index to the closing game on the 
training school grounds. Soon after the game began 
it was evident that our boys were winners, for their 
team work was superior to that of their opponents, 
and their game was more versatile and better exe- 
cuted. The sodden condition of the field — it was 
partially covered with water and a veritable slough — 
favored our players and their line smashes, espec- 
ially at the left wing of the training school eleven, 
which was weak, yielded yard after yard when gains 
were needed. It was kicking game, Cobb punting 
three times and Wright four times in the first half, 
while during the second half both punted four times. 



Alert work by Massachusetts in covering fumbles 
aided greatly in the scoring, "butter fingers" on the 
part of the training school paving the way to two 
touchdowns. The training school's lone score came 
as the result of a drop kick by Wright, who booted 
the ball from the 30-yard line at a difficult angle. 

Cobb, played strongly, a very pretty drop kick for 
a goal and a 12-yard dash for a touchdown being his 
work, and was easily the star of tne game, although 
Schermerhorn and Willis carried the ball strongly. 
Bailey allowed few gains around his end, and Hon- 
hart played well in the back field. There were about 
300 spectators on hand when the teams appeared, 
and the rooters for both teams yelled and sang with 
abandon. Wright kicked off to Cobb on Massachu- 
setts' five-yard line and the little quarter-back 
returned 15 yards. Ourteam immediately began ham- 
mering the line and pushed the ball to their 40 yard 
line, where a fumble gave it to the training school. 
By this time the men were covered with mud, even 
their faces being so bedaubed tha* it was almost 
impossible to distinguish one player from another. 
Massachusetts soon recovered the ball on a fumble, 
and by driving through the training school's left wing 
carried the ball to training school's 22-yard line, 
where it was held for downs. 

Wright punted to Cobb at center field, and Bailey 
covered Cobb's fumble. Honhart did 10 yards 
around right end, but a double pass, Carroll to 
Bailey, netted no gain. Wright punted to Cobb, 
who returned 10 yards to his 25 yard line. The team 
ground out 12 yards, and were then penalized 15 for 
holding, so Cobb punted again to Carroll at centerfield. 
On the next play Carroll tried a quarterback run and 
fumbled. Massachusetts recovered the ball. From 
that point, Massachusetts by plowing through Train- 
ing School's left wing and center, rushed the ball 
over, Schermerhorn making the touchdown. Cobb 
kicked the goal. Schermerhorn took the next kickoff 
and advanced five yards. Massachusetts was unable 
to make her distance and Cobb punted ; Briggs and 
Bailey made line plunges netting Springfield 16 yards, 
but Wright was then forced to punt. The half ended 
with the ball on Springfied's 40 yard line. 

The second half opened by Cobb kicking off to 
Bailey who rushed the ball in 17 yards ; in the next 



play Young lost the ball on a fumble ; five line bucks 
brought the ball within 13 yards of Springfield's goal 
and Cobb on a quarterback run, scored again for 
Massachusetts he also kicked the goal. Farley 
received the next kick off and ran the ball in 10 
yards; Schermerhorn followed with 17 more around 
the end ; Cobb was forced to punt and the ball went 
to Schermerhorn on a fumble ; Massachusetts fum- 
bled on their first down and Wright punted the ball 
out 30 yards. A series of line plays, and Cobb was 
in a position to successfully kick a goal from the field. 
Wright kicked off to Cobb who advanced 12 yards : 
the ball went to Springfield on a fumble ; Bailey 
made five yards through the line bringing the ball 
close to Massachusetts' goal line ; Wright kicked a 
goal from the field scoring the first and only points for 
Springfield training school. Soon after the next 
kickoff, Cobb's punt was fumbled and Anderson fell 
on the ball just inside Springfield's goal ; Watkins 
carried it over, but the unpire ruled out the play and 
penalized ourteam 15 yards for hurdling and 15 more 
for another reason ; French and Warner each gained 
six yards through the line and Cobb tried another 
goal but missed it. In the next few minutes of play 
Cobb was forced to punt and Wright soon returned it ; 
Ccbb made 20 yards by running in the punt and our 
backs pounded the line until tney had put Willis over 
for the third touchdown ; Cobb failed to kick the goal. 
Time was called with the ball in the center of the 
field. 
The line up : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Turner. Clark, 1. e. 

Farley. 1. t. 

Anderson. 1. g. 

Cutter, c. 

Johnson. Crosby, r. g. 

Sexton, r. t. 

Bartlett. Barry, r. e. 

Cobb, O'Donnell. q. b. 

Schermerhorn. Warner. 1. h. b. 

Watkins. French, r. h. b. 

Willis, f. b. 



TRAINING SCHOOL 



r. e.. Bailey 

r. t.. Briggs 

r. g.. Cook 

c. Wright 

1. g., Kerns 

1. t.. Holmes 

1. e.. McClaflin 

q. b., Carroll 

r. h. b., Allen 

1. h. b.. Honhart 

q. b.. Yonng 

Score— Massachusetts, 21 ; Training School. 4 Touch- 
downs — Willis. Cobb. Schermerhorn. Goals from touch- 
downs— Cobb 2. Goals from the field— Cobb, Wright. 
Referee— Davis of Wesleyan. Umpire— Dorman of Spring- 
field High school. Time— 25 minute halves. 



THE FOOTBALL SEASON. 

The Springfield Republican for Sunday, November 
18 comments as follows on the past football season : 

-The past season for the Massachusetts agricul- 
tural college has been the hardest in its history. The 
teams which have been played are entirely out of its 
class and the hard knocks received have showed up 
in the playing of the season. It is probable that such 
a hard schedule will never again be prepared. The 
athletic board which controls all undergraduate ath- 
letics considers that two or three of the hard games 
should be omitted. A long string of defeats at the 
hands of the big elevens has had a dampening effect 
on the team and the support given it by the student 
body. A substitution of contests with some of the 
state and minor colleges is suggested in place of 
those games in which little interest is now felt. The 
season opened quite auspiciously and Holy Cross and 
Willams were each held to a single touchdown. The 
game which followed with New Hampshire state was 
tied a wet field interfering greatly with the play. 
At Brown and Dartmouth the boys were outplayed, 
but did well against their heavy opponents. The 
game with Harvard was the feature of this year's 
schedule and was much more interesting than the 
score would indicate. This was even more true in 
the contest with Amherst. In all features the play- 
ing of Massachusetis was brilliant and only the luck 
of Amherst's star player, Hubbard, at a critical 
moment won the game for the latter. At Tufts, a 
heavy opposing team, many trick plays and an off day 
smothered any chance of winning. Coach George 
E O'Hearn, captain of the 1903 team, has put 
lots of time and effort into the team and his work is 
thoroughly appreciated. Two players will be lost this 
year by graduation, Cutter and Chapman, and with 
so much veteran material many hopes are expressed 
for the season of 1907. 



THE SOPHOMORES WIN. 

The sophomores won, 12 to 0, in the annual foot- 
ball game with the freshmen on Nov. 7. The 
-ntire student body was on the side lines, and with a 
few alumni cheered the teams. For a class contest, 
it was remarkably clean, andpenalizing was also infre- 
quent After a few minutes of play in the first half 






54 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



55 



O'Donnell made a quarterback run for a touchdown, 
and Turner kicked the goal. Later on In this period 
Warner made a run around the end and got away for 
another touchdown. Turner again kicked the goal. 
This completed the scoring, and the half soon ended 
with the ball in the middle of the field. During the 
second half the teams were more evenly matched, 
but the sophomores made steady and consistent 
gains. They were, however, unable to make a 
touchdown, and the ball moved up and down the 
field until time was called with it dangerously near 
the freshmen's goal line. During the entire game 
the 1910 team showed that they were unfamiliar with 
their signals, and their playing therefore lacked 
aggressiveness. O'Donnell, Warner, and Turner 
played excellently for the sophomores, and Nielsen 
and Blaney did well for the freshmen. The line-up \ 



SOPHOMORES 

Curran. 1. e. 
Thompson. I. t. 
E. Chase. Eddy, I. g. 
Neale, c. 
Cutler, r. g. 
Caffrey, r. t 
Alger, r. e. 
O'Donnell, q. b. 
Warner, I. h. b.. 
Turner, r. h. b. 
Corbett. f. b. 



FRESHMEN 

r. e., Nielsen 

r t.. Leonard 

r. g., Kelley. Turner 

c, Hazen 

1. g.. Urban, Hastings 

1. t.. Brandt 

1. e., Brown 

q. b., G. Chase 

r. h. b., Blaney 

1. h. b., McGraw, Woodward 

f. b., Schermerhorn 



Score — 1909. 12; 1910, 0. Touchdowns— O'Donnell, 
Warner. Goals from touchdowns— Turner 2. Referee— 
H. J. Franklin. Umpire— M. A. Blake. Linesmen— F. A. 
Cutter, head linesman. French and Bartlett. Timers— J. N. 
Summers and L. A. Shattuck. Time— 20 and 15-minute 
halves. 



to discuss the merits of the present season but to offer 
a suggestion for the future. It seems to the writer 
and perhaps others that if the larger colleges were to 
be played that only one of two should be put on the 
schedule and these at as late a date as possible. It 
must be acknowledged that it is an honor to play such 
colleges as Harvard and Dartmouth but could not a 
schedule be arranged with some of the colleges In 
this section such as Middlebury, N. H. State, Ver- 
mont, and a few others nearer our own class which 
would lead up to the harder games with Harvard and 
Dartmouth? This would put our men in better con- 
dition to play the larger colleges and also would 
afford more chance to win a few victories. 

X. 



COMMUNICATION. 

[The following it a contributed article. The Sional will not be respon- 
sible for opinions or statements contained therein.— Ed.] 

The Editor of the Signal : 

This season our football team has played a schedule 
as hard If not harder than that of any other college 
in New England, and, although we have not won a 
game as yet, we have held some of the larger colleges 
down to very small scores, especially Amherst, Holy 
Cross and Williams. But it has been a hard strain 
on the players and in the later contests some have 
shown the results of the harder games earlier in the 
season. However it is not the purpose of this article 



A LOYAL ALUMNUS. 

One of the most encouraging features, in connec- 
tion with the college Young Men's Christian associa- 
tion this year, Is the fact that an alumnus, Newton 
Shultis, is heart and soul with us in the work. Not 
only that but he is with us with his "pocket-book" as 
well. It is one thing to express an interest in the 
work but another to reach down in one's pocket to 
help things along financially. This may perhaps be 
exemplified by the members of the association when 
their "Membership Fees" come due. 

It will be remembered that before the summer 
recess Mr. Shultis presented the association with 
about 50 excellent books as a nucleus for a Y. M. C. 
A. library. This fall we received the necessary funds 
with which to purchase a book-case. The books 
have been put in the case and are available to stu- 
dents on Thursday evenings. To cap the climax Mr. 
Shultis has recently presented the association with a 
fine new set of "Association Hymn Books." This 
was a most needed gift and was met with a hearty 
approval by all the members. The fact that one of 
our alumni who has had more experience and seen 
more of the world than we, takes such an active 
interest in Y. M. C. A. work is significant of the 
great importance with which he regards it. It should 
arouse in each one of us a renewed interest in the 
great work the association is striving to accomplish. 



Colleg* Notts- 



Harvard cleared about $5000 above expenses on 
the Greek play given in the stadium last June. 



—The freshman class has elected William Hatch 
of Springfield basketball manager. 

—The Seminar held Nov. 4 was ?. very interesting 
field exercise taking up the different forms of dwarf 
trees, their value, uses, etc. 

—The college recently sent out a circular letter to 
all the newspapers of the state calling especial atten- 
tion to the short dairy course. 

—The sophomore class has elected Edward J. 
Burke and Walter J. Kenney, captain and manager, 
respectively, of their basketball team. 

—Professors Brooks and Waugh were at the con- 
vention of agricultural colleges and experiment sta- 
tions in Baton Rouge, La., last week. 

—A special car was chartered Saturday to carry 
some seventy of the students down as far as Holyoke 
to the Springfield Training school game. 

—Something quite a bit out of the ordinary was 
seen last Thursday when the football men ran through 
signals and had a lively scrimmage in a blinding snow 
storm. 

—A large force of Italians started in last week to 
lay a tile drain in the field east of the veterinary 
laboratory but the unexpected snow storm forced them 
to 'lay off" for several days. 

—The student body has elected Samuel S. Cross- 
man of Melrose, assistant manager of the baseball 
team, and Harry M. Jennison of Millbury has been 
chosen assistant basketball manager. 

—At a recent meeting of the senior class the fol- 
lowing committee was appointed to make nominations 
for the class-day speakers at commencement : F. C. 
Peters, J.N. Summers, A. H. Armstrong and Clinton 
King. 

—The last Seminar was in charge of Mr. Canning 
who gave a very interesting talk on chrysanthemums. 
This subject was timely and was illustrated by the 
various forms of this flower, the fourth most import- 
ant from a florist's standpoint. 

—The financial aid given to the fraternity confer- 
ence by the college for the maintenance of the 



informal dances is not available this year. Any 
deficit which occurs hereafter will have to be made 
up by those attending the informals. 



—Mr. Cooper of Springfield gave a very interest- 
ing and helpful talk at the last Y. M. C. A. meeting. 
In spite of the severe weather quite a good crowd was 
out. The meetings are being well attended this year, 
there being 1 15 at one of the recent gatherings. 

—A week ago Friday the Floriculture class under 
Mr. Canning visited Field's greenhouse in Northamp- 
ton. Mr. Sinclair, the manager, showed the party 
every courtesy and explained everything about this fine 
establishment. The display of chrysanthemums was 
especially fine. Many helpful hints were received. 
—Nineteen men have been transferred from Com- 
pany C to the other two companies of the battalion. 
Hereafter these two companies will have instruction 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays in guard mount. The 
work of the military department Is greatly hampered 
because the senior dairy practice removes so many 
officers. 

—The class of 1909 has elected the following 
Index Board: Editor-in-chief, Charles H. White; 
business manager, Robert D. Lull ; assistant business 
manager, Rockwood C. i.indblad ; literary editors, 
George M. Brown, Orwell B. Briggs, Myron W. 
Thompson; statistical editors; Harold P. Crosby, 
Myron W. Geer, Donald J. Caffrey. 

—Outdoor military drill Is over for the season, and 
Butt's manual will hereafter be practiced in the drill 
hall. No target practice has been held this fall, 
because the old range cannot be used for Krag- 
Jorgensen rifles, with the increased bullet trajectory. 
The commandant will ask the trustees for a new range 
this year, and also endeavor to get camp equipage for 
an encampment of a week or 10 days. 

—A part of the Botany division of the senior class 
accompanied Dr. Stone to Springfield on the after- 
noon of Nov. 9th to see some of the tree moving. 
Mr. Gale, city forester of Sprlngfied, met the party 
and explained the machine used In the operation. A 
maple tree 15 inches in diameter through the trunk, 
was on the truck and Mr. Gale explained the methods 
used both in taking it up and replanting it. Then 
some of the ' 'tree doctoring" in the city was inspected. 



56 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



57 










— The Y. M. C. A. meeting held Nov. 8 was In 
charge of Mr. Slack, a recent graduate of University 
of Pennsylvania. His object was to interest the 
students here In Bible study. Over 30,000 college 
men are at present taking this course in the different 
colleges. The classes are to be groups of men, meet- 
ing informally, at times most convenient for them- 
selves. There are over 50 enrolled here at present 
and anyone who is interested can obtain fuller particu- 
lars from White, '09, or the committee. 



D{p&rtmtn4r ftot?s. 



The columns of the editor of Department Notes are 
somewhat depleted this week by the absence of many 
of the department heads who have joined the general 
pilgrimage of agricultural and horticultural educators 
to Baton Rouge, La. So the editor takes occasion 
at this time to speak of the college library, and some 
of the new books of interest which have been added 
to our excellent collection. But before we go on to 
this subject proper, Dr. Stone wishes us to call atten- 
tion to a particular work of the librarian which should 
interest all the students, and particularly the alumni, 
from everyone of whom hearty and thoughtful co-oper- 
ation is urgently requested. This is the formation and 
continuance of "scrap-books" containing newspaper 
clippings and other printed articles which may bear in 
any way upon the college, its work, the work of those 
connected with it, such as any articles by professors or 
students or alumni, athletic accounts, and any articles 
which shall bear In any way upon Mass'chusetts. 
One volume of such clippings has already been neatly 
filled, and is of much value in matters of reference, 
particularly in the matter of dates. And to this end, 
it is requested that any article for this purpose shall 
be marked with the name of the paper in which it 
appeared, and the date of appearance. Another 
"scrap-book" is being made containing all the dance 
and commencement programs, and programs of 
such other events as take place at the college, or In 
connection with it, such as alumni and student ban- 
quets, musical performances, etc. For both of these 
collections the aid and co-operation of students and 
alumni is solicited, that they may be made as com- 



plete as possible. Contributions may be sent to the 
librarian, Miss Hall, or to Dr. Stone. 

During the summer and fall months, a number of 
valuable and instructive books have been added to 
the library collections. Some of the older and 
unused books are being stored away on top of the 
book-cases, and in other available, though not attain- 
able spaces, to give place for those books of newer 
interest. We shall speak of only a few of these addi- 
tions, suggesting that the students spend a few odd 
moments now and then in looking through the cases. 
It is indeed a revelation what a broad and comprehen- 
sive library we have, a library which most of us fail to 
appreciate. It has been built up carefully and with 
keen appreciation of the variety of interests which it 
must satisfy. Are you interested in anything particu- 
larly, history, architecture, engineering, the biological 
sciences, philosophy, our masters of English, the 
many branches of agriculture and horticulture, the 
medical sciences, chemistry, political and social 
economics, art, law, fiction, — whatsoever you will, — 
it is all there, in books well written, and beautifully 
illustrated. Indeed, this matter of illustrations can- 
not be over-estimated. Nothing brings out a point so 
well as a good illustration, and our library is profuse 
with beautiful ones, many in colors, and many others 
as engravings or half-tones, a wealth of beauty for the 
artistic eye, and a succinct means of instruction. 

Some of the newest additions are as follows : "A 
History of the American People," in five volumes, 
by Wilson ; a number of essays by Briggs, one vol- 
ume entitled "School, College and Character," and 
another entitled "Routine and Ideals" ; a beautiful 
collection of full-paged half-tones, accompanied by a 
few words of explanation, entitled "The Gardens of 
Italy;" another large volume, equally replete with 
illustrations, and an exquisite compilation of artistic 
effects, entitled "Fountains, Statuary, Architecture, 
and Gardening," by Charles Latham; another book 
of the same character entitled "American Estates 
and Gardens" and still another "Some English 
Gardens," the latter containing besides half-tones, 
many delicately colored views ; an elaborate book on 
"English Cottages and their Doorway Gardens," by 
Ditchfield, also beautifully illustrated; a small book 
with a rather suggestive title on "A Self-supporting 
Home," by Kate Maur ; some veterinary books 



entitled "Handbook of Horse-shoeing," by Dollar, a 
very practical book; "The Pathology of Infectious 
Diseases of Animals," Moore, and "Frohner's Gen- 
eral Veterinary Surgery," by Undall ; a couple of 
engineering books, "Railroad Location, Surveys, and 
Estimates," Harris, and "Economics of Railroad 
Construction," Webb ; a volume entitled "Appreci- 
ation of Pictures," by Sturgis; Henry Van Dyke's 
"Essays on Application ;" a "Glossary of Entomol- 
ogy," Smith; "Entomology with Reference to its 
Economic Aspects," by Folsom, a well illustrated 
and practical volume ; an intensely interesting book, 
beautifuliy and clearly illustrated, entitled "The Frog 
Book," finished in colors and halftones, by Mary 
Dikerson ; a "Guide to the Study of Fishes," by Jor- 
dan; an old "Botany," published in 1833 by Bal- 
four, of the University of Edinburg, quaint and inter- 
esting because of its age ; a survey of the field of 
experimental biology entitled "The Dynamics of Liv- 
ing Matter," by Noeb; another biological book by 
Jennings on the ' ' Behavior of the lower organisms ; " 
a book by Professor Bose, the great Hindu savant, 
entitled " Plant Response as a Means of Physiologi- 
cal Investigation," which is a continuation of the 
Calcutta philosopher's book of three years ago enti- 
tled "Response in the Living and Non- Living" and is 
almost startling in its sweeping conclusions. Tnis lit- 
tle book represents one of the greatest advances in 
science of modern days. Such are a few of our new 
valuable additions. 



Alll 



mm. 



A meeting of the Local Alumni association was 
held in the Amherst House, Saturday evening, Nov. 
17. On account of the Amherst game a very goodly 
attendance was secured, the number, including some 
student representatives, being 65. Some of the out- 
of-town alumni were R. W. Lyman, '71, of North- 
ampton, J. W. Clark, 72, of North Hadley, S. S. 
Warner, 73, of Northampton, G. P. Smith, 79, of 
Sunderland, Edward Gillett, '84, of Southwick, S. H. 
Field, '88, of North Hatfield and H. T. Shores, '91, 
of Northampton. The toastmaster was Seth S. 
Warner, 73. Some of the speakers of the evening 
were President Butterfield, David Barry, '90, R. W. 



Lyman, 71, C. E. Gordon, '01, Prof. W. P. 
Brooks, Prof. S. F. Howard, G. A. Drew, '97, and 
Coach O'Hearn, '04. President Butterfield com- 
mended the friendly relations existing between 
Amherst and this college, spoke of the beauty of the 
country in which we are located and outlined the work 
of the college. Other speakers were also fain to dwell 
upon the great improvement in feeling between the 
two institutions, and praised the good work of the team, 
besides discussing many college subjects. Members 
of the college musical clubs rendered some selections 
In a very praiseworthy manner, and the meeting closed 
with the best good feeling, by singing the college song. 
The following men have been nominated as "trustee 
candidates" by tne associate alumni of M. A. C. to 
succeed the two whose terms expire Jan. 1 : Lemuel 
Le B. Holmes, 72, of New Bedford, Elmer D. 
Howe, '81, of Marlboro, Henry J. Field, '91, of 
Greenfield, Seth S. Warner, 73, of Northampton 
and Charles E. Ward of Buckland. 

The following alumni attended the meeting of the 
A. 0. A. C. at Washington: W. H. Bowker, 71, 
E. W. Allen, '85, D. F. Carpenter, '86, C. H. 
Jones, '90, E. B. Holland, '92, S. W. Wiley, '98, 
and B. H. Smith, '99. 

71. — in the recent election Robert W. Lyman of 
Northampton defeated Seth S. Warner, 73, in the 
contest for register of deeds of Hampshire county. 

71. — Geo. C. Woolson has been in charge of "Hill 
Crest," at Purchase, West Chester County, N. Y., 
the private country estate of Wm. A. Read, since last 

May. 

72.— Dr. Geo. Mackie, one of the oldest and best 
known practitioners in Attleboro died very suddenly 
Aug. 31 of heart disease. 

79. Prof. S. B. Green of the University of 

Minnesota has recently published a bulletin entitled 
Ornamental Trees, Shrubs and Herbaceous Plants in 
Minnesota. This appears as bulletin No. 96 of the 
Minnesota Experimental Station. It comprises 73 
pages of text and 38 pages of excellent half tones. 

'83.— Samuel M. Holman of Attleboro was 
re-elected representative to the general court from the 
first Bristol district. 

'87.— W. H. Caldwell, President of the Grani»e 
State Dairymen's association for three years, was a 



-I « 



58 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



59 



delegate to the Republican state convention and chair- 
man of the Republican club at Peterboro, N. H. 

'88. — R. B. Moore, superintendent of the works of 
the American Agricultural Chemical Com pany, 
Philadelphia. 

'91. — Dr. E. P. Felt, New York state entomolog- 
ist Is the author of two recent publications of the New 
York state museum. One deals with the Gypsy and 
Brown Tail Moths which threaten to invade New 
York state in the not distant future. It includes 20 
pages of text and 10 plates of illustrations including 
several half tone photographs by Superintendent A. H. 
Kirkland, '94. The second of the publications is the 
21st Report of the State Entomologist which includes 
106 pages of text and 10 plates. The principal sub- 
jects dealt with in this report are shade tree pests, the 
control of mosquitoes and the studs of "gall gnats," 
of these last several new species are described. 

'92. — G. E. Taylor won first prize and the Evarts 
silver cup (a magnificent trophy eighteen inches nigh) 
for the best herd of Shorthorns exhibited at the Wind- 
sor, Vt., fair. He was recently elected a member 
of the Franklin Harvest club. 

'92. — G. B. Willard has been City Auditor of 
Waltham since Sept. I. 

'95. — G. A. Billings has been made instructor in 
dairying in the New Jersey School of Agriculture, and 
is to be one of the lecturers at the farmers' institutes 
this coming winter. 

'95. — E. A. White, Professor of Botany at the 
Connecticut Agricultural college has publisha d a report 
on fungi. The following is a portion of the review which 
appears in Science: "In a preliminary report of the 
Hymeniales of Connecticut Prof. Edward A. White 
published (in Bulletin 3 of the State Geological and 
Natural History Survey) the resultsof his studies of the 
larger fungi (mainly toadstools and pore-fungi) of 
Connecticut. It constitutes a thick pamphlet of 
eighty-two pages of text and forty excellent half-tone 
plates of photographs." 

'95. — H. A. Ballou, Imperial Entomologist for the 
West Indies is the author of a paper on "Cotton 
Stainers' ' which has been submitted to the faculty of 
this college as a thesis for the degree of Master of 
Science and recommended to the trustees for accept- 
ance. In addition to biological notes on the species of 



cotton stainers found in the West Indies, three new 
forms are described as new. One of these is dedicated 
to Dr. H. T. Fernald and given the name of Dysdercus 
fernaldi. 

'96. — Mr. Newton Shultis is in business with his 
father Mr. Mark Shultis at 601 Chamber of Com- 
merce building, Boston. It is he who has so liberally 
contributed to the Y. M. C. A. and to athletics. The 
secretary of the Athletic Board has received another 
check from him and takes this opportunity of correct- 
ing the item in a recent Signal which incorrectly 
stated that Mark Shultis, '91 , was the donor of the 
book case which was presented by Newton Shultis, '96. 

'99.— Dr. W. E. Hinds Is the author of Bulletin 
59 of the Bureau of Entomology U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, entitled "Proliferation as a factor in 
the Natural Control of the Mexican Cotton Boll 
Weevil." 

'00. — Mark H. Munson has bought a 400 acre 
farm at Littleville, and is to engage in the production 
of early lambs for the New York and Boston markets. 

'02. — The wedding of Irwin F. Cooley and Miss 

Elizabeth B. Galpin took place Oct. 20, 1906, at 

Denver, Col. Address, after Dec. I, 1230 Wash- 
ington ave. 

'04. — Fred F. Henshaw of Alaska was present at 
the Amherst game coming as he expressed it, "Three 
thousand miles to see the game." 

Ex-'05. — F. Bartlett, in work as horticulturist at 
the Normal School, is manager of the Peninsula 
Experimental Farm, where some important fertilizer 
experiments are being carried on. 

'05. — R. L. Adams has taken up his residence at 
Anderson, Cat. for the winter, to work on the pear 
blight under Prof. Ralph E. Smith, '94. 

'06.— "Bud" Hall is studying law in Northamp- 
ton, in the office of Lawyer Hammond. 

'06. — The following more complete addresses have 
been received since the publication of the 1906 list : 

Addison T. Hastings, Jr. 39 Orchard St, Newark, 
N.J. 

James E. Martin, 142 York St., New Haven, Conn. 
Willard C. Tannatt, Jr., 82 Whalley St., New 
Haven, Conn. 



lrvttrcolW£i&"te. 



At a mass-meeting of Brown students week before 
last, one of the most notable ever held in the univer- 
sity, over $2000 was raised in 30 minutes, making 
up the deficit of the athletic association. 

The name of Tufts college divinity school has 
been changed to the Crane divinity school in recogni- 
tion of a gift of $100,000 from Albert Crane of New 
York, in memory of his father, Thomas Crane. 

Owing to the increased demand throughout the 
state for high school teachers and principals and the 
inability of the normal schools to provide the same, a 
new chair of education has been estab lished at the 
University of Maine. 

The university extension course at Brown has 
begun. An extraordinary number of applications for 
registration have already been received, 371 In all, 
the great majority of them from teachers in the city 
of Providence and vicinity. 

Some 25 seminary girls at Washington, Pa. 
attended the cane rush of Washington and Jefferson 
college contrary to the orders of their principal. In 
the melee, the girls got between the rushing classes 
with torn dresses and shattered nerves as the result. 
Now the young women have been expelled from the 
seminary for disobeying orders. 

The subject for the debate between Williams, 
Amherst and Wesleyan has been chosen, and Is as 
follows: "Resolved, that the policy embodied in the 
treaty now pending between the United States and 
San Domingo is a desirable departure in American 
diplomacy. ' ' In the discussion all arguments depend- 
ing on the Monroe doctrine will be considered 
irrelevant. 

Practically every room in the dormitories at Colum- 
bia is in demand, while additional applications are 
expected to be handed in at the opening of the second 
half-term in February. One thing which appeals 
strongly to the students is the matter of self-govern- 
ment through two hall committees elected by the res- 
idents themselves. In this way the entire responsibil- 
ity of conducting the various affairs connected with 
the life in the dormitories falls upon the students, who 
have thus far handled matters to the complete satis- 
faction of the authorities. 



Geo. F.VesterJr. 

TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 

485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 



Ai.no 



Dying£lcaning< Pressing, and Repairing. 

All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me • postal and I will call on you. 

jy Full Drew Suits to rei t. «-StudenU. Cloth. bou«l.t. 

7 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 
Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 

best in the market. 

NEXT TO FIRST RATIONAL BARK. 



1 



6o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The new athletic field at Syracuse university is 
nearing completion. The length of the stadium from 
the entrance on Irving avenue to the outer row of 
seats on the east side is 670 feet, and the width is 
470 feet. It will inclose a quarter-mile track. The 
seating capacity of the stadium will be 20,000. 
Besides this a promenade 20 feet wide wiil extend 
around the outer row of seats, and will contain stand- 
ing room for nearly as many more. On the east side 
of the stadium a tunnel will lead to the gymnasium. 

THE CO-OP. 



A complete line of W. H.GOWDY 
CO. FURNISHINGS. 

Represent KAISER, the College 
Tailor of New Haven. 

ALSO 

THE HENRY H. TUTTLE CO., 

Shoes, of Bcston. 



YOU fiMWOI BD1LD GREENHOUSE 

AVhen you are at Amherst, but it's 
fair to suppose you won't alwa\* 
be at Amherst — so some day you 
will want a greenhouse — the right 
kind— a thorough dependable prop- 
osition — then wc want you to 
think of us — that is why we think 
ot you now. 

Lord & Burnham Co., 

greenhouse Designers 
and manufacturers, 

1133 Broadway, cor. 26th St., N. Y. 

Boston Bkahch, xifl Tremont Building. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLTOKI, mass 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFF. OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Hampiets 
and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKEB & CO, 

THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 
Most Attractive Cafe in Ne* England. 

Private DtuiBf goo»« for Lmlie.s and Theatre Parties. 

(lis-, and KiiiU'inity BMqnetg ;• specialty. 

Try our Spinal Sunday Dinners, .". i\ m. to 8.;50 r. M . Mc 

When in town gt>« un a trial and lie convinced. 

Open until mktnlfht. 

EDWARD A. LEVIS, Manager. 
12-1-1 Suffolk St., - - Holyoke, Ma-s 

Telephone connection. 

AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUpto-DaU. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE TRICES. 

1). H. KENDRWK, Proprietor. 

Rabar's 3m., 

Old South Street, off Main, NORTHAMI'TON, MASS. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cnisin«?. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RxxxxaR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. DECEMBER 12, 1906 



NO. 



TubUsheTF^nighUy by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Student.andA.umni.r.reo.u.s^^^^ 
„nt to all subscribers until iU discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paia. 

notify the Business Manager. ■ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 

RALPH JEROME WATTS 1907. Business Manager. 

inHN ROBERT PARKER. 1908. Assistant Business Manager. 

1 ,»,Tm. . EARLE GOODMAN BARTLETT. 1907. 
ARTHUR WILLIAM H1GG1NS. 1907. Alumni Notes. * DAN 1ELS PH1LBR1CK. 1908. 
JOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes^ FA RRAR. 1908. 
DANFORTH PARKER M.LLER. ^^^'^ qRWELL BURLTON BR.GGS. 1909. 
GEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR., 1909. ^KWt 



-^^r^^^Ti^^^ »—b- — «- •' ,,nit6d St ° te " ' nd ?_^ 2-^2L 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C A. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
College Senate, 
Readir.g-Room Association. 
Basket-ball Association. 



C. H. White. Pres. 

M. H. Clarlc. Jr.. Manager. 

F. C Peters. Pres. 

J. N. Summers. Sec. 

E. D. Phiibrick. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

Base Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry, Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters, Pres. 
E. G. Bartlett, Manager. 



Entered as second-cUss matter, r o-l Office at Amherst. 




As the winter season approaches slides of snow and 
ice from the roofs of the chapel and the two dormi- 
tories begin again to menace the happiness if not the 
safety of pedestrians on the sidewalk below. Some 
efficient sort of guard should be placed on the build- 
ings to prevent this discomfort of literally getting a 
mess of snow "in the neck." This matter has been 
mentioned in former years with no visible result but 
we once more bring it to the attention of the 
authorities. 



There has been absolutely no appearance of factional 
discord during the past three months and over. Now 
as never before we can appreciate at this college the 
words of praise uttered by the heavenly hosts on the 
plains of Judea so many centuries ago: "Glory to 
God in the highest, on earth peace, good-will to men." 



The Thanksgiving recess is past. The turkey 
hash and warmed-over plum pudding jokes have van- 
ished from the newspapers and the store windows 
trimmed with an abundance of green are beginning to 
display Christmas goods. With the approach of the 
holidays we instinctively recall that memorable event 
which led to all this benevolence and joy. Never has 
a better feeling existed among the M. A. C. students. 



We are pleased to note that a citizen of Hadley 
has at last appealed to the railroad commissioners for 
improved service on the electric railroad between 
Amherst and Northampton. The conditions which 
have existed on that line since its absorption by the 
Connecticut Valley company have become very exas- 
perating. Lack of sufficient seats and a weak power 
system have of late rendered a trip "across the river" 
to "Hamp" of almost as doubtful nature as that jour- 
ney across a greater stream to a land "from whose 
bourne no traveller returns. We trust that the action 
of the state board of commissioners will give Amherst, 
its citizens and students, the street railway accommo- 
dations which the rather heavy traffic demands. 



1 



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62 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The mass meeting held about two weeks ago was 
very Inspiring. It served to indicate the close inter- 
est which our local alumni have in college athletics 
and for this alone was valuable. The ideas expressed 
were even more commendable. The establishment 
of an advisory board seems to be of the greatest pos- 
sible advantage to the student athletic management. 
It is possible to create a great saving in money and 
material by systematizing the present methods. The 
experience of former years would not be then entirely 
lost and an auditing of accounts as the season pro- 
gressed would obviate the necessity of "padding" 
various items in the manager's reports to make up for 
forgotten expenses. Under such a system charges 
of dishonesty and carelessness, now often utterly 
untrue but Irrefutable, could no longer be made and 
the athletic association, relieved of much of its cum- 
bersomeness, would be placed on a business basis. 
We recommend a speedy action upon this matter by 
the athletic board. 



The present freshman class is to be commended 
for its self-restraint in refraining from pastelng its 
numerals in various prominent places, as have many 
of the preceding classes. However, such a tendency 
toward self-glorification has cropped out during the 
last few days, and the sophomores are in their turn to 
be commended for the prompt action they took in 
having the offending numerals removed. Advertising 
is all right In its place, and for certain purposes, but 
in connection with the various classes, and we may 
even add fraternities, of a given college It is best 
accomplished by good deeds, for fraternity, class or 
college. The truest fraternity or class spirit is good 
college spirit. It does not consist in vainly flaunting 
the emblems which one holds dear. That is a false 
patriotism, cheapened because we are all equally 
good at it. Ideals are worth having and living up to 
even in the small and trivial affairs of college life. 
We trust that in this case a word of warning is suffi- 
cient, and that '10 will restrain her exuberant spirits 
who delight to spend their idle moments in carving or 
drawing the tokens of their inexperience as college 
men. 



school at Petersham, Mass. The article is of spec- 
ial attraction to M. A. C. students because the prin- 
cipal of the school and the real power behind it is 
Edwin H. Scott of the class of 1906. The idea of a 
purely agricultural public school education was enun- 
ciated some years since by the secretary of agricul 
ture but this is the first attempt to put the scheme In 
operation in New England. Agriculturists have 
become convinced that the tendency of the public 
school system is to call students toward the classical 
and technical colleges while the agricultural institu- 
tions are left to chance students who may happen 
along. At Petersham the district schools have all 
been consolidated in one "rural school" and over this 
has been placed the agricultural high school with the 
agricultural college as the natural sequence. As a 
member of our faculty remarked, it will be Interest- 
ing to note how many students are sent our way 
because of this movement over in the hills of cen- 
tral Massachusetts. The a; vide referred to quotes 
an enthusiastic Interview with Mr. Scott in which his 
ideals and future plans are outlined with characteristic 
clearness. With a new and commodious building, 
capable assistants and the confidence of the towns- 
people the field for development In this direction 
appears almost unlimited. That such a recent grad- 
uate of the college should have become a pioneer in 
elementary agricultural education will reflect credit 
upon the college and help to stifle some of the 
unkind and ignorant criticism of the course of study. 



The Boston Sunday Globe for Dec. 2 has an inter- 
esting half-page account of the agricultural high 



A few hours before this editorial was written, Its 
author attended a meeting of the college Y. M. C. A. 
It was a somewhat remarkable meeting. There was 
no special music. The attendance was not large. 
There was no pulpit oratory nor evangelistic hysteri- 
cism. The subject for discussion was: — "A man's 
life in college " and the only speakers were students. 
As the meeting progressed and finally reached its 
close the writer began to wonder really how much his 
own life as well as that of those round about him had 
been influenced by college life. It Is fashion today 
for us to extol the advantages of a course of study in 
a higher Institution. They say that it is such a broad- 
ening and strengthening agent for one's moral and 
mental capabilities. These ideas are right. But 
how about the other side of the question ? Alas, how 



> 

* 
O 

o 

H 
W 

> 
r 

o 

G 
> 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



63 



much dross is mingled with these golden advantages! 
At this college it Is not considered proper outside of 
certain circles to profess Christianity. At the 
expense of our own good we fear the risk of being 
called hypocrites. Is not this true of most colleges ? 
That the whole principle is wrong, radically wrong, is 
unquestionable. The college man must guard him- 
self especially well for he is exposed to peculiar temp- 
tations. With few restraints he is intimately associ- 
ated with many others who may be influenced by his 
actions. Here is the opportunity for the true Chris- 
tian. The writer was once talking with another con- 
cerning a classmate, then lost in the oblivion of the 
lower ranks but now one of the leading men in col- 
lege. Said the person first mentioned: "1 consider 
that man a practical Christian. He does not play for 
the grandstand or talk 'thine is the glory' all the time 
but he quietly goes his own way, doing what he thinks 
is right and silently suggesting that others do likewise. 
He is my ideal." The passing of time has shown 
that such an attitude has its reward and that "this 
practical Christian" has done for the moral welfare 
of the college what some of the spell-binders who talk 
more have not done. It is the old, old story which 
Milton epitomized in those uords : "They also serve 
who only stand and wait." 



M. A. C. 

Burke, Whitmarsh, 1 f. 
Cobb. r. f. 
Gillett, c. 
Cutter, I. g. 
Chase, r. g. 

Score— M. A. C. 37 
leu 6. Burke 4. Cobb 3. 



mary which was incorrectly printed in the Springfield 
Republican follows : — 

TRINITY. 

r. g.. Pond 
1. g , Olmstead 
c. Donnelly 
r. f.. Connor 
1. f.. Cook 
Trinity. \2. Goals from floor— Gil- 
Chase 3. Connor 2, Donnelly 2. 
Cutter, Olmsted. Goals from fouls— Gillett 3, Donnelly 2. 
Free tries missed— Gillett 3. Pond, Donnelly. Fouls called 
on M. A. C. 4. on Trinity 6. Referee— Peters. Timekeeper 
— Thurston. Length of halves — 20 minutes. 

Westfield H.S.,33; 1910, 12. 
The freshman basketball team was defeated 
Dec. 5. at Westfield by the local high school team, 
the score being 32 to 12. The line-up ; 

WESTFIELD HIGH. 

Gibbs, 1. f. 

Aldrich. r. f. I- g 

Flouton, c. 

B. Clark. 1. g. 

Williams, r. g. 



M. A. C. 1910 

r. g., Waldron 

Neilson, Smith 

c. Leonard 

r. f.. Hatch 

1. f.. Woodward 



/Athletic Notts- 



BASKETBALL. 

Massachusetts, 37 ; Trinity, 12. 
The college team easily defeated Trinity in the 
first game of the season Dec. 8, in the drill hall. 
Our players were fast and found little difficulty in 
locating the basket. Burke and Gillett played a bril- 
liant and consistent game and Cobb made three spec- 
tacular shots for the basket. Donnelly was the star for 
the visitors. The home team started at the beginning 
of the first half and gained a lead of about three to 
one which was maintained throughout the game. At 
the end of the first half the score stood 14 to 4 in our 
favor. The second half opened with a rush, Trinity 
scoring three times in succession and then things 
steadied down. The game was especially free from 
unnecessary roughness. Late in the second half 
Whitmarsh went in, in place of Burke. The sum- 



1910. 
Leonard 
Waldron 



Score -Westfield high 30. M. A. C. '10. 12. Goals from 
floor— Aldrich 9, Gibbs 4. Williams 2. Woodward 2. Waldron 
2. Leonard, B. Clark. Goals from fouls— Leonard 2. Fouls 
called-on Westfield. 5. on freshmen 9. Referee— Taylor 
of Springfield. Umpire— Barker of Westfield. Time— 20- 
minute halves. Attendance 100. 

Middletown H. S., 37; 1910, 12. 

The freshman basketball team was defeated Dec. 
8, by the Middletown high school at that place, 37 
to 12. 

The line-up : 

MIDDLETOWN. 

Ramsdell. 1. f. r - K 

Jackson, r. f. '• Z 

Inglis, Tormay. c. C Schermerhorn 

Cannon, 1. g. r - f - Woodward 

Ross! Inglis. r. g. 1- f - Ha,ch 

Score— Middletown 37. 1910 12. Goals from the floor 
—Jackson 6. Ramsdell 6, Inglis 2. Cannon 2. Ross 2, Hatch 
4, Woodward. Schermerhom. Referee and umpire— Carl- 
son. Length of halves— 20 minutes. 

We take pleasure in publishing in this issue 
the report of the 1906 baseball manager. Car- 
ried on as was the season with the greatest financial 
difficulty and in the face of many old and unpaid bills 
Mr. Cutter is to be congratulated upon the remark- 
ably small deficit. No better argument is needed to 






6 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



65 



to show the advantage of electing careful and prac- 
tical men to such positions. 

The basketball season is "on" in earnest. Owing 
to the hard schedule and the experience of former 
years the management has thought it advisable to 
employ a coach, and Eugene Edwards of Northamp- 
ton has been engaged in this capacity. His opinion 
of the team that while fast and composed of good 
material it displays a lack of team work and basket 
throwing is apparently well founded. This has char- 
acterized all M. A. C. teams of recent years and it 
is for this reason that a coach has been secured. 

The schedule of the coming season follows : 

Dec. 8. Trinity at Amherst. 

Wesleyan at Middletown. 
Connecticut Agricultural college at Storrs. 
Dartmouth at Hanover. 
University of Vermont at Burlington. 
Worcester P. I. at Amherst. 
Cushing at Amherst. 
Cushing at Ashburnham. 
Fitchburg Young Men's Chiistian Asso- 
ciation at Fitchburg. 
Connecticut Agr'l. college at Amherst. 
Brown at Amherst. 
University of Vermont at Amherst. 
Williams at Williamstown. 
Rensselaer Institute at Troy. 
St. Lawrence at Canton, N. Y. 



Jan. 



11. 
12. 
18. 
19. 
9. 
16. 
23. 
24. 



26. 
Feb. 22. 

26. 

27. 

28. 
Mar. 2. 



Worcester Tech.,) 
Faculty, 

Alumni, for coaching, 
Taxes from students, 

Total, 



12.00 

49.25 

25.00 

534.00 

$1304.21 



REPORT OF BASEBALL MANAGER. 

Season 1906. 

Receipts. 

Holy Cross, guarantee, $ 50.00 

Wesleyan, 60.00 

Brown, 100.00 

Rhode Island, 18.96 

Holyoke, 25.00 

Springfield training school, 25.00 

Trinity, 40.00 

Dartmouth, 85.00 

Boston college, 50.00 

Colby, 50.00 

Maine, 75.00 

Cushing academy. 45.00 

Andover, 60.00 
Collected on campus, (Maine, Colby and 



Expenditures. 

Coach and expenses, 

Holy Cross trip, 

Maine, guarantee and official, 

Wesleyan trip, 

Brown and Rhode Island trip, 

Holyoke, 

Colby, guarantee, etc., 

Springfield training school, 

Trinity, 

Dartmouth, 

Worcester Tech., 

Maine trip, (Boston college, Colby and 

Maine.,) 
Cushing academy, 
Andover, 
Stationary, 
Outfitting, 
Sundries, 

Doctor's bills due to football season, 
Basketball defecit, 

Total, 
Receipts. 



$ 22.00 
54.85 
77.75 
44.69 
100.36 
15.67 
52.75 
27.04 
36.09 
79.74 
50.25 

231.52 
40.80 
86.15 
13.75 

232.90 
29.45 
29.50 
88.09 

$1313.26 
$1304.21 



Deficit, 



$9.05 
F. A. Cutter, Manager. 
M. A. Blake, Auditor. 



FOOTBALL NOTES. 

h has been the custom of the Signal to publish 
every year a review of the football season together 
with the statistics of the players and such comment 
as seemed pertinent. During the past few weeks the 
Signal has followed quite closely the playing of the 
team and by means of special correspondents has so 
closely covered the game that it seems unnecessary 
to publish an extended review now that the season is 
over. Realizing the importance of preserving a list of 
the men who fought for Massachusetts on the grid- 
iron during the past fall we print the names of the 



players with their position, weight, height, age and 
the number of games played. Honor to whom honor 
is due 



artlett, r. e., 146 lbs. .5 ft. 10 in., 19 yrs.. 9 games. 
;xton. r. t., 175 lbs.. 5 ft. 11 in.. 20 yrs.. 9 games, 
jtter, capt.. c. r. g.. 165 lbs , 5 ft. 7 in.. 22 yrs., 9 games, 
osby, r. g.. 1. h.. 178 lbs.. 5 ft.. 11 in.. 19 yrs., 7 games. 

*- ■ r. 1AO lkc A It IO ..re * rr^m.c 



Bartlett 

Se 

Cutter 

Crosby, r. g.. 1. h.. 178 lbs.. . 

Johnson, r. g.. 169 lbs.. 6 ft., 19 yrs , 3 games. 

Paige, c. 165 lbs.. 5 ft. 6 in., 23 yrs., 6 games. 

Anderson. 1. g., 152 lbs., 5 ft. 11 in., 22 yrs., 9 games. 

Summers, 1. g., 155 lbs., 5 ft. 10 in.. 22 yrs.. 4 games. 

Farley. 1. t.. 171 lbs.. 5 ft. 11 in.. 21 yrs.. 9 games. 

Turner. 1. e.. 170 lbs.. 6 ft. 1 in., 19 yrs.. 4 games. 

Barry. 1. e., 147 lbs., 5 ft. 7 in., 20 yrs.. 5 games. 

Chapman, 1. e., 1. h., 145 lbs.. 5 ft. 9 in.. 22 yrs., 6 games. 

Clark, 1. e., 146 lbs.. 5 ft. 7 in.. 23 yrs., 1 game. 

Cobb. q. b., 151 lbs., 5 ft. 8 in., 20 yrs . 9 games. 

Watkins. r. h.. 160 lbs.. 5 ft. 10 in.. 22 yrs.. 6 games. 

French, r. h.. 145 lbs., 5 ft 8 in., 21 yrs , 2 games. 

Warner, 1. h.. 163 lbs.. 5 ft 9 in.. 19 yrs.. 6 games. 

Schermerhorn. 1. h.. r. h. 168 lbs.. 6 ft. lin.. 19 yrs.. 9 games 

Willis, f. b.. 169 lbs., 5 ft. 10 in., 19 yrs.. 9 games. 

Statistics concerning Alger substitute end, 
'Donnell substitute quarter are not available. 

At a meeting of the football "M" men held on 
Dec. 5, George R. Cobb of Amherst was elected 
captain of the 1907 eleven. Since entering col- 
lege Cobb has played a star game at quarter and 
he has four years of creditable playing at the same 
position charged to his name at the Amherst high 
school. At the same meeting Kenneth E. Gillett of 
Southwick was elected manager for the ensuing year. 
Gillett is a man of marked business ability and knows 
the game thoroughly. Since entering college he has 
held several prominent positions in undergraduate 
enterprises. The names of five sophomores were 
recommended as suitable candidates for the assistant 
managership. These will be voted upon later by the 
student body. 



and 







1908 INDEX. 

The Index Board regrets that owing to unfortunate 
circumstances the Index will not appear until after 
Christmas. The failure of the engravers to get the 
half tone engravings to the publishers on time is the 
reason for the regretted delay. The book will appear 
as early In January as is consistent with good work. 
J. R. Parker, Editor-in-Chief. 



Colleg? N°*tS- 



— Professor Hord of the University of Maine visited 
college recently. 

— A basketball tax of $2.00 has been levied on the 
entire student body to support the team this year. 

— W. C. Lightbody, 1910, has left college and has 
secured a position in a wholesale house in Boston. 

— The cold snaps have solidified the waters of the 
college pond Into ice which offers fairly good skating. 

— The winter recess begins on Wednesday, the 
19th, and continues until Jan. 2, at 8 a. m. The first 
semester does not end until Feb. 6. 

— Several students entertained friends from beyond 
the river and mountain on Saturday, the game with 
Trinity proving the special attraction. 

— Quite a number of the students hearing the reports 
of the big conflagration in Holyoke last Friday went 
over to investigate. They got "stung." 

— As F. C. Peters was leaving the entomological 
laboratory one morning last week he slipped on a piece 
of Ice and injured his knee quite severely. 

— A joint meeting of the Stockbridge and Chemical 
clubs was held on Dec. 5. W. E. Dickinson, '07, 
spoke on "Milk inspection in Massachusetts." 

— M. A. Blake, instructor in horticulture, left the 
first of the month to take up his new duties as horti- 
culturist at the New Jersey experiment station. 

— President Butterfield has been elected a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the Young Men's 
Christian association for Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island. 

— Prof. F. A. Waugh delivered a lecture at the 
Horticultural Hall in Boston before the school garden 
conference on the 15th. His subject was "Horticul- 
tural education for school gardens." 

— Last week's Y. M. C. A. meeting was led by 
the president of the association, C. H. White. The 
subject was "A man's life in college" and more than 
ordinary interest was developed in the topic. 

— President Butterfield intends to establish a course 
in rural sociology in the immediate future. The 
president's reputation in this subject is such that a 
course given by him should prove of especial value. 



I 



66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



67 










Some "obstreperous freshman" daubed the 

numerals of his class on the walls of the drill hall last 
week but the sophomores quickly removed them. As 
sentiments now exist It seems likely that the senseless 
scattering of class numbers over all college property 
has ceased forever. 

—Probably 25 students, at least, were inconven- 
ienced by the general mix-up of the Boston & Albany 
railroad schedule on the Sunday following Thanks- 
giving. With the trains from a half to two hours late 
many missed the Springfield connections and some 
were obliged to stop over night before reaching 
Amherst. 

— Before the Thanksgiving recess a mass meeting 
was held and several local alumni spoke concerning 
the establishment of an athletic advisory board. Mr. 
Blake, '04, who has been auditor of the athletic asso- 
ciation also urged that the accounts of the various 
managers be audited after each trip and action will 
probably be taken on the matter soon by the regular 
athletic board. 

The reading-room does not present a very good 

appearance at present. With all of the magazines 
missing together with several lights and with fragments 
of high school papers scattered about despite the 
efforts of the janitor, the place is not inviting. With 
no money in the treasury and no support from the stu- 
dent-body it looks as if the reading-room association 
was on its "last legs." 

The advantage of the reserve reservoir on Clark 

hill has been felt strongly during the past few weeks 
when the town water has been shut off several times 
for making repairs at West Pelham. It would seem 
however that the collection of dead branches, pine 
needles and other debris on the surface of the reservoir 
should be taken away, for the drinking such water is 
repugnant if not unsanitary. 

—On Wednesday night, Dec. 5, was held the first 
meeting of the Esperanto club. Professor Welling- 
ton occupied most of the hour in a very instructive 
talk on the origin and purposes of Esperanto. He 
also showed very forcibly the benefits to be derived 
from the knowledge of an universal language and 
especially emphasized the ease with which Esperanto 
is learned. The class will hold its meetings every 



Wednesday evening in room 8, Chemical Laboratory. 
All are invited. 

A self imposed critic of the Signal has compared 

the College Notes to that somewhat mythical BingiAlle 
Bugle. We realize only too well that most of these 
items do not signify much to outside readers of the 
paper. The local columns of any newspaper however 
have little interest to the majority of its readers. 
Each part gratifies the taste of some one and we con- 
tinue the existence of this column with its gossip, if 
you want to call It so, because it seems to be an 
integral and essential portion of the whole. 



COMMUNICATION. 

(The following is a contributed article. The Signal will not be respon- 
sible for opinions or statements contained therein.— Ed.] 

To The Editor of the College Signal \ 

With genuine pleasure I read in a Sunday Republi- 
can, recently sent me, of the good feeling shown 
between Amherst and Massachusetts at the recent 
football game on Pratt Field ; and I cannot refrain 
from sending you a word to let you know what a feel- 
ing of joy it gave me to hear that a new and better 
era in the relations of the two institutions has begun. 
The sincere, frank words of the writer leave me no 
room to doubt that his statement is an accurate sum- 
ming up of the general satisfaction of the local public. 
Really, I am intensely pleased, and I want you to 
know it. 

If there is one thing that especially impresses me 
over here in this land with respect to students in insti- 
tutions of higher learning, it is the courteous, digni- 
fied respect the university m^n have for each other. 
Naturally there is in a certain sense, though not in an 
athletic way, a rivalry between the various universi- 
ties j but all students feel themselves to be members 
of the same family, as it were, and there is absolutely 
no disposition to speak disparagingly of various institu- 
tions. There is a gentlemanly and scholarly brother- 
hood deeply and firmly established. I doubt not that 
a similar spirit, deep in the hearts of the students, is 
also felt and cherished in American college and uni- 
versity circles ; but the outward expression of this 
spirit could be improved and cultivated. 

I can hardly realize that the last month of the year 
is at hand. For me, deep in my work, the time flies 



by with lightning-like rapidity. But 1 never cease to 
think of the pleasant friends and acquaintances I have 
made at Massachusetts, and I send this across the 
ocean hoping that it will reach you in time to let me 
wish the college a Merry Christmas. My constant 
wish is that Old Massachusetts, under conditions 
which now seem to be especially favorable, may grow 
and keep on growing and that everyone who has stud- 
ied there, or who has taught there, or who hears of 
the college may refer to it with a feeling of pride. 
Once more best wishes to you all ! 

Herman Babson. 
Berlin University, Nov. 30, 1906. 



"SANS SOUCI." 



It was a hot summer day late In June. As Herbert 
Reed, a rising young lawyer in New York, sat in his 
Broadway office, he was contemplating whether to 
leave his work and go out for a drive or to stick it out 
a while longer. His partner would be back from his 
vacation the next day. Business was not very brisk 
at that season of tne year. He rose and walked to 
the window ; looking down at the moving mass in the 
street below, he stretched himself wearily as he 
thought of some cool retreat in the country somewhere. 
Just then the post-man came in and he returned 
half heartedly to his desk to open the mail, which was 
not very large that morning. Looking over the 
letters one dainty little missive attracted his attention ; 
such letters did not usually come to his office. As 
he read it a happier look came over his face but he 
folded It up deliberately as though in suspense. Then 
as with a newly awakened interest in life he rose 
hastily and took the rest of his correspondence In to 
his clerk in the next room. Then he went back to 
his desk and wrote a letter and a telegram : the former 
to his partner saying he would leave that afternoon on 
his vacation ; the latter to his college chum, Charles 
Bowdoin, saying that he would arrive that evening at 
his home in the Berkshires. For the dainty note 
that had roused him so much had been from his col- 
lege chum, whose fine country residence in the Berk- 
shire hills was the delight of ail who saw it. The 
note had been a pressing invitation for him to spend 
his vacation with the Bowdoins. 

Reed had always been a modest and retiring man. 



In college he had been a studious and hard working 
student and since college he had risen rapidly in his 
profession. His modest manner made him a favorite 
in society, especially with the fair sex, but his chum 
Charles Bowdoin had led to the altar the only object 
of his deeper affections. His sense of the gentleman 
would allow him to think of her only as a friend, 
though he knew that there was something else than 
friendship which he did not seem able to control. 
Those laughing brown eyes had captured him com- 
pletely and though he had seen her but little since his 
college days he had not quite outgrown the old feeling. 
That afternoon as he alighted at the pretty little 
station of one of Berkshire's country towns the world 
had a much brighter aspect for him than it had had a 
few hours before. His chum met him and In a few 
minutes he found himself seated in the carriage, 
beside the prettiest girl that he had ever seen. She 
had been introduced as Mrs. Bowdoin 's sister. There 
were those same brown eyes. He knew as soon as 
he saw her that he had been mistaken before. It was 
for her that he had cared all these years. He felt the 
old feeling coming back, not for her for whom he had 
first cherished it, but for the one by whose side he 
now sat. He had never seen her before yet he had 
loved her all along. He wondered if any such 
thoughts were running in her mind but he was sud- 
denly brought to the realization that this was no place 
for dreaming. 

"Well, Herb, old fellow," his chum was saying, 
"you are looking well and happy. The cares of busi- 
ness do not seem to belong to you." 

"Helen would have come down to the station with 
us, but she had to give a paper at the club this morn- 
ing and did not come to lunch very early. Ruth will 
tell you that we were more than delighted when we 
got that telegram this morning." 

"Yes," said his fair seat mate, "even I was glad 
when I heard that you were coming for I had heard so 
much about you from Charles and Helen that I was 
anxious to know,— that is, to meet you for I have 
always felt as though 1 knew you from hearing you 
spoke of so often." 

"I really felt as though I had known you before, 
too," Reed said, "perhaps it is from your resemblance 
to your sister. ' ' 

Just then they came in sight of the house. It was 



68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



a beautiful structure of three stories. A broad veranda 
ran around two sides : the one side looking down to 
the garden ; the other looking toward the lake a 
quarter of a mile distant. Spacious lawns stretched 
away en every side, and the huge elms entwining 
their branches together formed an ideal retreat from 
the summer sun. Altogether it was a perfect "sans 

souci." 

As the carriage drew up before the door, a woman's 
form appeared on the veranda. In a moment she 
was at the carriage and had seized him by the hand, 
"Herbert, we are so glad that you came. It will 
seem so like old times to have you here. 1 hope you 
will enjoy yourself." 

"In such a beautiful place as this I can do nothing 
else. You cannot know how glad I was to get that 
invitation this morning. 1 couldn't wait one minute 
but took the first train that was coming this way." 

That evening as they walked toward the lake, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bowdoin and Ruth Merton and Herbert 
Reed, they rehearsed the things that had happened 
during and since the college days. It was a beautiful 
summer evening and though the moon had not yet 
risen the silver stars shone forth in all their brightness. 
At the lake Reed and Miss Merton became separated 
from the other two. The starry sky reflected in the 
water presented a very pretty scene, and as they 
looked out upon it, Herbert asked, "Do you like to 

row?" 

"Very much," his companion answered, "I am 
often out on the water alone for hours." 

"It is too late this evening but will you go out 
tomorrow?" he asked, 

"I shall be very glad to," she said. 

They walked briskly along but they did not overtake 
Mr. and Mrs. Bowdoin until they were almost to the 
veranda. Herbert joined them there and Miss Merton 
disappeared inside. 

That night when he reached his room, Reed sat 
down to think. One might say that this was love at 
first sight, yet he had loved her before he had ever 
seen her. He must make the most of his short 
vacation. 

He did not sleep very soundly that night and was up 
early the next morning enjoying a walk in the cool 
morning air. After breakfast he went out with Mr. 
Bowdoin to look at the horses. Horses seemed to be 



Bowdoin's hobby for he had some of the prize win- 
ners of the country. Reed later had an opportunity 
to test the merits of several of them himself. 

Out on the lake that evening, Reed and Miss 
Merton were enjoying themselves, at least he was. 
He found that she could row as well, If not better, 
than he. Now they would glide over the water, now, 
absorbed in their conversation, they would float along 
or the boat would come almost to a standstill. 

The days rolled by. Sometimes the four would 
drive out in the country together. Sometimes he 
would drive out alone with Miss Merton. But nearly 
every evening they took their row on the lake. Every 
night he found himself more desperately in love. 
Yet, if she had any thought along that line, she did 
not show it by word or look. She treated him as a 
friend, perhaps a little better than an ordinary friend, 
but that was all. 

His vacation was nearly over. The next morning 
he would go back to the cltv to his work ; yet he had 
received not one word of hope. They were together 
on the lake that evening as usual. 

"Miss Merton,— Ruth," he began, "tomorrow I go 
back to the city but 1 cannot go without telling you 
how I care for you. Ruth, I love you." 

While he had been speaking her eyes were drooped 
in the sweet modesty of maidenhood. But when he 
had finished she raised them tenderly to his and both 
her hands clasped in his, they floated gently on. 

(Editorial Note —It is not the policy of the SiGHALto print literary articles 
of the foregoing nature but several editorial columns have fallen behind this 
week when there is a dearth of sporting news and to avoid blank space we 
publish this short story.) 



D*p&rtmf rvf ftot?s. 



HORTICULTURE. 
In previous years, spring spraying with the Ilme- 
sulphur mixtures has been practiced here at college, 
as well as generally throughout New England. But 
the growing practice of fall spraying in the central- 
southern states, and the use of soluble oils as a sub- 
stitute, and even a rival, of the lime-sulphur mixtures, 
has attracted the attention of experimenters. This 
year, fall spraying is to be practiced In the college 
orchard, soluble oils being used in place of the lime- 
sulphur mixture usually applied to the college trees. 



The work Is already under way, Professors Waugh and 
Fernald supervising the work, and such students taking 
part as are interested in this radical change in spray- 
ing operations. The usual spraying machines and 
nozzles are being used. 

Spring spraying has hitherto been considered best 
for New England. Our Massachusetts experimenters 
are trying to demonstrate the advantages and disad- 
vantages of fall spraying, striving to arrive at some 
definite conclusion as to its advisability. One advan- 
tage claimed for this system is that a repetition of the 
spraying may be made in the spring if the fall spray- 
ing fails. This, evidently, doubles the chance of 
success in fighting the pest. Then too, time can be 
better spared by the busy farmer in the fall than in 
the spring. Other advantages may appear in the 
course of the experiment. 

Perhaps the most important feature of the experi- 
ment lies in the use of soluble oils and water as a 
spraying mixture. It might be said here that soluble 
oil is the term applied to any of the petroleum oils 
which have been so refined that they will diffuse read- 
ily and quickly in water. Thus no mixing or heating 
is necessary. The oil is simply added to the water, 
and taken to the orchard, when the mixture is ready 
for spraying. This embodies a great saving in 
the time and labor necessary in preparing the lime- 
sulphur mixtures. Otherwise, at present market 
prices, the cost of the ingredients of the two mixtures 
is about the same. One disadvantage in the use of 
the oil mixture is that the progress of the spraying 
cannot be watched as well as In the use of the light 
colored lime-sulphur mixture. On the other hand, 
the oil mixture will spread more readily and evenly 
than the heavier lime-sulphur mixture, and besides is 
much cleaner to handle. The relative merits of the 
arguments for and against both mixtures are thus to 
be carefully worked out, and definite conclusions 
drawn if possible. The percentage of oil used in the 
mixture is also a matter of experiment, and cannot 
be safely stated at this time. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

Dr. Stone has been preparing pure cultures of 
yeast for the use of Cape Cod cranberry growers who 
are experimenting with cranberry wine. The wine is 
especially recommended for medicinal purposes, a 



sample sent to the East Experiment Station proving 
very good. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 
At a meeting ot the Stockbridge club on Nov. 20, 
Archie H. Kirkland, '94, superintendant of the 
Gypsy Moth commission, delivered an address 
accompanied by stereoptican views upon the work of 
the commission against the gypsy and brown tail 
moths in Massachusetts. Mr. Kirkland clearly 
showed and explained the damaging work of the 
insect pests, and the peculiar markings by which each 
may be recognized. The discussion then led to an 
explanation of the methods practiced by the commis- 
sion in fighting the pests, the results obtained, and 
what must be done in the near future to combat them 
successfully. Mr. Kirkland particularly requested the 
co-operation and sympathy of the students of this 
college In the work of the commission, especially In 
the matter of overcoming such foolish prejudices as 
some ignorant or obstinate citizens of the state have 
against the good work of the state and national com- 
missions. The following clipping from a supposedly 
first class daily of central Massachusetts shows the 
extent to which a well enlightened and Intelligent 
editor may be deceived in his own conceit : "These 
pests may bs depended upon to grow into the 
Importance which costs the nation and the state to 
lose half a million dollars a year for pruning out the 
growth. That same pruning keeps the moths improv- 
ing like a well-tended grape-vine, and the fruit is more 
expensive year after year. The entomologists come 
to be very fond of the nice little moths, and do all 
they can for them. They kill off a few thousands of 
the weakest of them, those which have no better 
sense than to build their nests in sight, but the great 
majority became pets and live on forever, as the 
moth time is computed. The Japanese moths are to 
be added to the list of pets this next year, and the 
expense is to grow apace accordingly." Besides 
being a poor piece of English composition, the utter 
ignorance of the worthy editor in treating the subject 
is glaring throughout the editorial, so that it rather 
appeals to our sense of the ridiculous than to our better 
judgment. Mr. Kirkland impressed upon his enthu- 
siastic audience the close relation of the work of the 
commission to the work of our entomological depart- 
ment here at college, the best of its kind in the coun- 
try, both in teachers and equipment. 









70 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



A number of lines of research are-being carried on 
at the Entomological laboratory this year. 

E. A. Back is now working up a collection of the 
Asilidae or Robber-flies received from Harvard uni- 
versity, and another from the American Entomologi- 
cal society of Philadelphia, preliminary to writing his 
thesis on that group. 

H. J. Franklin has nearly ready for the printer, a 
bulletin containing the results of his work at Wareham 
last summer studying the cranberry insects, and has 
also recently received collections of bumble bees 
from Leland Stanford university, and the Brooklyn 
museum, for study. 

C. W. Hooker has been collecting information on 
the distribution of the various broods of the Seventeen- 
year Locust in Massachusetts, and is also stu dying 
the life history of the Spinach Leaf Miner, which 
has been doing considerable destruction in the eastern 
part of the state. 

H. M. Russell is conducting fumigation experi- 
ments on cucumbers, to determine their power of 
resistance to different doses of Hydro-cyanic acid gas, 
along the lines of work on tomatoes taken up last 
year by Mr. Tower ; and is aiso working on the life 
history of a Gall fly on oak. 

The type specimens of insects deposited at the 
college have now been brought together in Schmitt 
Boxes, which are kept in Brock Brothers metallic 
cases. A list of these types is being prepared for 
publication. 



Alu 



mm. 



The twenty-first annual reunion and banquet of 
the Massachusetts agricultural college club of New 
York was held Friday evening, Dec. 7, at the St. 
Denis hotel. The speakers scheduled for the even- 
ing were : Kenyon L. Butterfield, M. A., president 
of M. A. C. and Charles A. Goessmann, Ph. D., 
LL. D., professor of Chemistry at M. A. C. since 
1868. The meeting was then thrown open to an 
informal session with speeches by some of the 
faculty, and members of the club. 

The following is taken from the announcement of 
the meeting : "Dr. Goessmann is the last of the Old 
Guard that was with the college at its inception ; Clark, 



Stockbridge, Goodell, to name no more, ae with the 
great majority ; Dr. Goessmann's connection with 
the college covers all the classes ; in his advanced 
age he is living the unostentatious life of the scientist 
and Christian gentleman ; of our teachers no man Is 
greater beloved. We confidently expect the honor of 
his presence." 

The following alumni and members of the faculty 
were present at the recent convention of the Ameri- 
can association of Agricultural colleges and Experi- 
ment stations held in Baton Rouge : President Butter- 
field, Dr. Brooks, Professor Waugh, Dr. Green, 79, 
of Minnesota, Dr. Hills, '81, of Vermont, Dr. 
Wheeler, '83, of Rhode Island, Dr. Allen, '85, of 
Washington, D. C, W. B. Harper, '96, W. A. 
Hooker, '99, J. E. Hatligan, '00, and R. I. Smith, 
'01. Trustee Ellsworth was also present. 

Members of the class of 1897 who are interested 
in the class reunion to be held at commencement are 
invited to correspond with P. H. Smith, of the Hatch 
Experiment station. 

'78.— Sanford D. Foot is resident manager of the 
Kearney and Foot works of the Nicholson File com- 
pany of Povidence, R. I. Address, 231 West 70th 
St., New York city. 

Ex- '87. — George P. Robinson is the owner of the 
Fair Oaks colony land. His address is 1006 4th St., 
Sacramento, Cal. 

'90.— D. W. Dickinson, D.D. S., formerly instruc- 
tor in the Harvard dental department is now practising 
dentistry at Watertown. 

'91.— A. H. Sawyer, address 149 North 16th St., 
East Orange, N. J. 

'93. — Cotton A. Smith is a real estate agent, 329 
Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

'94. — T. F. Keith is in the theatrical and advertis- 
ing business at 304 Main St., Fitchburg. 

'95. — A very interesting and valuable bulletin has 
been received from C. B. Lane, Assistant Chief of the 
Dairy Division, Bureau of Animal Industry, on "The 
Milk and Cream Exhibit at the National Dairy Show, 
1906." It has numerous excellent illustrations 
and is well worth study. 

'96 two years course. — Elwyn W. Capen, M. D., 
physician and surgeon, 74 Main St., Monson. 
'97. — G. A. Drew visited Amherst recently. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



7» 



'99. — Dan A. Beaman is professor of agriculture 
in the University of Puerto Rico, Ponce, P. R. 

'00.— F. G. Stanley, M. D., 144 Cabot St., 
Beverly. 

'00. — Many will be pained to hear of the recent 
death of Mrs. J. W. Kellogg, formerly of Amherst, 
of typhoid fever. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg were 
sick, but it was believed that Mrs. Kellogg was on 
the road to recovery when she died. Her funeral was 
held in Amherst, Dec. 4. 

Ex- '01. — Ernest W.Curtis is a sewer, railroad and 
bridge contractor. He is at present located in the 
Board of Trade building in Jacksonville, Fla. 

'03.— Philip W. Brooks of Imperial, Cal., writes 
that business is good and that he hopes to be in 
Amherst at the next commencement. 

'03. — William E. Tottingham who was until 
recently assistant chemist at the Geneva, N. Y., 
experiment station is now instructor and student in 
agricultural chemistry at the University of Wisconsin. 

'03. — W. V. Tower is doing very well in Puerto 
Rico, and reports that he has recently received a 
raise in salary. 

Ex- '03. — Patrick H. Bowler was married Oct. 1 1 , 
at Bondsville, to Miss Nellie Donavan. 

Ex- '04. — George A. Graves, civil engineer, care of 
Chief Engineer, Central New England railway, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

'05. — We wish to apologize for the mistake that 
appeared in the last number of the Signal concern- 
ing F. A. Bartlett. Mr. Bartlett is a graduate of 
M. A. C. and not an "Ex" man. 

'05. — W. B. Hatch visited Amherst recently. 

'05. — W. A. Munson has been very ill in the hos- 
pital with typhoid fever. 

'05. — A. N. Swain has been in Amherst recently, 
to visit a near-by place of interest. 

Ex- '05. — Frank F. Hutchings is a student in elec- 
trical engineering at the Worcester Polytechnic insti- 
tute. He was for two years a special student at M. 
I. T. His address is 2 State St., Newton Hall, 
Worcester. 

'06. — "John" Pray, who soon goes to Cuba as a 

sugar chemist, visited college recently. 

Ex-'07. — H. 0. Russell is a tobacco grower at 
North Hadley. 



Geo. F. Vester, Jr. 

TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 

485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

4140 

Dying.Clianing, Pressing, and Repairing. 



All onlers promptly attended to. 
Drop me a postal anil I will call on you. 
Full Dress Suits to rent. ##-Students, Cloths bought. 



7 Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. 

CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 
best in the market. 

NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



I 



72 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Ex-'08.— John S. Potter is with Todd, the printer, 

at 14 Beacon St., Boston. 

«. 

The new building of the department of agriculture 

at Rutgers, which is to provide accommodations for 
the short courses in agriculture, is nearing completion, 
and will be ready for occupancy by Jan. 2, when the 
work in these courses begins. The sum of $24,000 
was appropriated at the last session of the New Jer- 
sey state legislature for the erection and equipment of 
this building. 



THE CO-OP. 

A complete line ot W. H.GOWDY 
CO. FURNISHINGS. 

Represent KAISER, the College 
Tailor of New Haven. 



ALSO 



THE HENRY H. TUTTLE CO., 
Shoes, of Boston. 



_ 
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You Hre Going to Have a Hone 

of your own some day. You like 
flowtTH and would like to have them 
the whole year 'round. This laboring 
in your garden for four short months 
— and the rest of the time dreary 
waste dots not halt pay. In the 
greenhouse you have a garden all the 
year 'round. That means lettuce, 
radishes, cucumbers — roses, carna- 
tions at any time. Send for booklet 
"Two P's "--it tells all about these 
things. 

Lord & Bnrnham Co, 

Greenhouse Designers 
and manufacturers, 

1133 Broadway, cor. 26th St., N. Y. 

Boston Bbaich, 819 Tremont Building. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

IIOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

KINK CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. liOWKKR & CO. 



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THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 
Most Attractive Cafe in New England. 

Private Dtetag Rooms for Ladies and Theatre Parties. 

Class aud Fraternity Banquets* a specialty. 

Try our Special Sunday Dinners, 5 i\ M. to 8.30 p. M., 50c. 

When in town give us a trial and be convinced. 

Open until midnight. 

EDWARD A. LKWIS, Manager. 

1M1 Suffolk St., - - Holyoke, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp-to-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



Ralw's 3nn t 

Old South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, MA 88. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop -with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 9. 1907 



NO. 7 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should b« addressed. Collbg« Sigmal, Amhbrst. Mass. The Siomal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested te 

notify the Business Manager. ^ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 
RALPH JEROME WATTS, 1907. Business Manager. 
DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908, Assistant Editor. 
JOHN ROBERT PARKER. 1908. Assistant Business Manager. 
ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS. 1907. Alumni Notes. EARLE GOODMAN BARTLETT. 1907. 

JOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes. ROLAND HALE VERBECK. 1908. 

GEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON, JR.. 1909. ALLAN DANA FARRAR. 1908. 

ORWELL BURLTON BRIGGS, 1909. 



Terms : fl.OO per gear in adcance. Single Copies, 10c. Postage outside ef United States snd Canada. „c. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot- Ball Association. 

College Senate. 

Reading- Room Association. 

basket-ball Association. 



C. H. White. Pres. 

M. H. Clark. Jr.. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

J. N. Summers. Sec. 

E. D. PhHbrick. Manager. 



Ath'etic Association 

Base-Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec 
T. A. Barry. Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
E. G Bartlett, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 
•kaJMstM * »%\v»%»»v Wis - ** 



Ed.-tbrie.ls. 



The reopening of college after the holidays is a 
time for congratulation and well-wishing. The Sig- 
nal trusts that 1907 will prove to all of its readers 
u a happy new year." 



The meeting of the trustees last month was cer- 
tainly an epoch-making event for the college and we 
regret that lack of space postpones any editorial com- 
ment upon the transactions until iater. A full 
account so far as it has been announced to date 
appears in this issue. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



During the past few weeks the college has figured 
prominently in the newspapers of New England. This 
is the direct result of the agitation during the past few 
years of The Signal for adequate recognition of the 
college by the press. The action of that excellent 
paper, the Springfield Republican in appointing a cor- 
respondent to cover M. A. C. news alone has forced 



its contemporary in the city down the river to take 
similar action and the exchange readers of the Boston 
papers have not been slow to clip these items. Thus 
we are at last getting the publicity for which we have 
waited so long. 



One need of the publishers of this paper is an ade- 
quate office. It is a peculiar fact that during the last 
four years none of the editors-in-chief have resided in 
the college dormitories. As at present constituted 
only one member of the editorial board really lives at 
the college, the rest being scattered as janitors of 
remote college halls, at the frat. houses or down town 
on Pleasant street. This latter location is handy to 
the printing office but is not conducive to good editing. 
As soon as practicable the college authorities should 
allow The Sicnal the use of one of the small rooms 
in the tower of South College or elsewhere for this 
work as these rooms are useless for recitations. 



The long postponed beginning of a class in Bible 
study is we feel a decidedly progressive movement. 






74 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



75 



Among well-educated men of today there is a start- 
ling ignorance in scriptural matters and we know of 
no better place than the college for a systematic study 
of the subject. Those who have received instruction 
in the natural sciences will look at certain portions in 
an entirely different light from heretofore and will feel 
the true significance according to modern reasoning. 
The study coming as it does on Sunday afternoon will 
fill a blank space and will offer a sort of substitute for 
Sunday chapel. The Signal has never felt the justi- 
fication for the abolishment of this exercise and 
believes that when it ceased the college began to fall 
back in its religious activities. We hope that the 
students en masse will take a real and positive interest 
in the Bible study instituted by the Young Men's 
Christian association. 






The lack of a room where pictures of the athletic 
teams and the trophies which they have won can be 
displayed is extremely unfortunate. To be sure pho- 
tographs have been placed in the library and North 
College reading-room but the arrangement is quite 
unsystematic and of little value. Under present cir- 
cumstances slight stimulus can be given athletic 
events from past achievements because the passing of 
the victorious teams out into the world has caused 
them to be forgotten. Going a step further a room 
for the above purpose could also be used as a reposi- 
tory for the medals and certificates of honorable men- 
tion which the college has received for its exhibits at 
various fairs and expositions. As few are perhaps 
aware the medals obtained at St. Louis are now in 
the zoological museum for safe-keeping. Here they 
are unknown to many casual visitors and attract little 
attention. We trust that whenever a building for 
administration purposes is asked for, a place for these 
trophies, medals, pictures, etc. will not be forgotten. 



doubtless these people believe that The Signal is 
prejudiced in a like manner although they are too 
polite to say so. This is again true in a measure for 
a paper published entirely by students must certainly 
feel the influence and trend of public opinion. It is 
somewhat remarkable to note how people change 
their views with the passing of time for those men 
who were the worst offenders along this line in their 
college days are now the ones most ready to admit 
their own shortsightedness and to warn others of the 
danger. We add our word of caution to those from 
outside sources against this " besetting sin." But 
are not our alumni friends a little severe upon us? 
It seems as if every rash word or deed of the student 
body had been magnified to undue proportions. Our 
somewhat limited experience and the testimony of 
others better posted than ourselves leads us to believe 
that in the words of another "all college men are 
kickers." If this is so the delinquencies of Massa- 
chusetts men are pardonable if not excusable, pro- 
vided such a distinction exists. The events of the 
past show that when the whistle blows the undergrad- 
uates as well as the alumni and former students will, 
one and all, rally to the support of the Massachusetts 
agricultural college. We need not worry about this 
"lack of team-work" and kindred troubles for they 
have no more influence upon the ultimate advance- 
ment of the college than have th-; showers of a mid- 
summer afternoon upon "the passage of time from 
era to era." 



In another column will be noted a criticism of the 
students of this college by some of the alumni who 
recently attended a convention in New York. These 
critics say, and correctly too, that the undergraduates 
here are constantly finding fault with existing condi- 
tions, are short-sighted and narrow in their views, 
allow petty grudges against a professor or course to 
unduly influence them and in general show little pride 
in the college. This is, as we have said, all true and 



THE SECOND INFORMAL. 

The second informal dance was held in the drill 
hall under ihe auspices of the fraternity conference 
on Dec. 15. The hall was neatly decorated with 
red and green bunting on the steam pipes, while the 
bareness of the walls was relieved by a large number 
of "Massachusetts" banners. Plants from the col- 
lege greenhouse added a pleasing touch to the decor- 
ations. At intermission refreshments were served at 
the hall instead of the dining-room as was intended ; 
for the fog and ice made a promenade out doors 
anything but pleasant. The patronesses were Mrs. 
Hoagland of Smith, Mrs. Morse of Mt. Holyoke and 
Mrs. Hasbrouck, Mrs. Gordon and Mrs. Holcomb of 
Amherst. About forty-five couples were present. 



A REVIEW OF 1906. 

At the end of each year the daily papers usually go 
over their files and print a resume of the news 
recorded there. It seems interesting and instructive 
to look over the Signal for 1906 in a similar manner. 

Jan. 10. — The first issue of the year contains an 
excellent editorial tribute to the late President Goodell 
which was written by Professor Brooks for the annual 
report of the college. Several columns are also 
devoted to President Butterfield and the past history 
of the institution. The basketball season began 
under inauspicious circumstances. Professor Howard 
reports that $381.50 have been contributed for the 
support of the athletic association by alumni and non- 
graduates. Much interest in fraternities appears 
owing to the election of new members. The Stock- 
bridge club is established by interested agricultural 
students under supervision of Professor Brooks. A 
half tone insert cf Mr. Butterfield is printed. 

Jan. 24.— A musical club is started by Messrs. 
Rogers and Tannatt of the class of 1906. Owing to 
financial difficulties the basketball manager cancelled 
his season after several bad defeats. A review of the 
1907 Index, Is published as well as the composition 
of several senior committees. A. H. Kirkland, '94, 
is elected president of the society of Economic Ento- 
mologists. Wilder hall is informally opened. 

Feb. 7.— An editorial appears criticising the man- 
ner in which quizzes are forced upon the lower classes 
almost daily before the final examinations. The base- 
ball schedule with several home games is printed. 
Opposition to the college appropriation bill by Con- 
necticut Valley farmers crops out and a committee is 
appointed to go before the legislature. The trustees 
petition the latter body $168,500 for new buildings 
and maintenance. Feb. 3, the members of the 
Massachusetts alumni club at their annual meeting 
listened to President Butterfield and other speakers. 
The report of the 1905 baseball manager shows a 
deficit of over $270.00. Professor Brooks is 
appointed director of the Hatch Experiment station. 

Feb. 21.— The 1907 "prom." comes off success- 
fully under auspicious skies and fine sleighing. The 
legislative committees hold a hearing upon the appro- 
priation bill and "the embattled farmers" appear in 
opposition. Commemorative exercises are held on 
Lincoln's birthday. The first musical of the 



orchestral club nets over $20.00 of clear profit. Mr. 
Akerman begins his lectures on forestry. 

March 14. — The senior class presents a successful 
minstrel show. The Connecticut Valley Alumni asso- 
ciation meets in Springfield as does the M. A. C, 
club of Washington in that city. 1908 defeats 1909, 
25-10 at basketball. Another lively legislative hear 
ing is held at Amherst. Doctor Lull resigns. 

April | |. —New editorial board assumes control. 
The baseball season opens. Doctor Walker and Pro- 
fessor Babson resign. The new catalogue appears. 
The musical association gives a concert at South 
Hadley Falls. Better Farming Special starts out 
from the college. Basketball elections occur. 

April 25. An editorial criticises the action of the 
senate ruling on freshman banquets and "Ann '08" 
has a word to say. Tne old "Hash-house" is torn 
down. The musical association gives a concert In 
the town hall. 

May 9.— The Signal apologizes for the recent 
criticism of the Senate's action. A long string of 
baseball defeats take place. The football report is 
published. The junior and freshman cl.iss banquets 
occur at New York and Springfield respectively. A 
class "interview" takes place in Hadley meadows. 
Newton Shultis donates 50 books to the, Y. M. C. A. 
The legislature having appropriated funds, work is 
commenced on the new barn and botanical building. 
May 23. --Captain Hale inspects the battalion. 
Several baseball victories are won. The grounds and 
drives are prepared for commencement. An exhibi- 
tion of spraying machines Is conducted by Professor 
Waugh and Mr. Blake. 

June 6. — The freshman class picture is success- 
fully taken. The western alumni meet. Another 
concert is given in the chapel by the musical associa- 
tion. The legislative committees pay a flying visit to 
college and the evening before 1908 banquet at 
Greenfield. 

June 20.— Class fight takes place on the campus. 
Entomologists among the alumni offer prizes for work 
in that department. Football schedule showing game 
with Harvard appears. New tug-of-war described. 
The college year is reviewed, commencement news is 
published and the goodbyes said for the long vacation. 
Sept. 29.— O'Hearn, '04, is engaged as football 
coach. Messrs. Gordon, Neal and Holcomb are 



7 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



added to the faculty. Krag-Jorgensen rifles are 
adopted in the military department. President's 
office is enlarged. The Senate bars prep, school 
numerals and letters. An entering class of about 80 
registers. The freshmen are dragged through the 
the pond in the tug-of-war. 

Oct. 10.— An excellent half tone engraving of 
Capt. Cutter appears as a frontispiece. Everyone 
guessing at the new football rules. Massachusetts 
loses to Holy Cross and Williams by small scores and 
ties New Hampshire. Fraternity conference meets 
to consider new "rushing" rules. The Y. M. C. A. 
has an enjoyable reception. The freshman lose the 
old fashioned rope pull by 18 feet in a contest lasting 
only half the specified time. 

Oct. 24. — Brown, Harvard and Dartmouth easily 
win at football. Signal suggests new rules for the 
"M". The freshmen secure a class picture easily. 
President Butterfield is formally inaugurated in the 
presence of many distinguished guests. Mr. Blake 
resigns as instructor in horticulture. 

Nov. 7. — Amherst wins 12-8 in a game which was 
a moral victory tor Massachusetts. Many alumni 
back for the game and banquet in the evening at 
the Amherst House. Paige has his ankle broken at 
Pratt field. New "frat." rules are adopted. Presi- 
dent Butterfield goes West for a few weeks. A 
chemical club is organized by students in that subject. 
Nov. 21. — The football schedule is criticised as 
too hard. An "off" day brings defeat at Medford 
but the season closes with a grand flourish at Spring- 
field 21-4 in our favor. The sophomores win the 
class football game 12-0. Mr. Shultis gives an 
excellent bookcase to the Y. M. C. A. All the heads 
of departments are at Baton Rouge. 

Dec. 21. — Basketball season opens with a strong 
schedule and varsity defeats Trinity. Statistics of 
the football team are printed and report of 1906 base- 
ball manager appears with a deficit of $9.05. 1908 
Index will not be out until after Christmas. A. H. 
Kirkland, '94, speaks on gypsy and brown tail moths 
before large audience. New York Alumni club holds 
a smoker in New York city. An Esperanto club is 
formed. 




BASKETBALL. 

Basketball matters have steadied down after the 
excitement of the first of the season. The playing 
of the varsity has been consistent and the team 
seems to be "coming" in a satisfactory manner. 
All that is needed now is the earnest support of the 
student-body even although the Wesleyan and Dart- 
mouth games did not result favorably. The sports 
about college are already beginning to size up the 
relative strength of the sophomore and freshman 
teams. The balance of opinion appears to favor 
the freshmen and they have played a number of 
practice games with neighboring high school teams 
but in the class contest an element enters which ren- 
ders the result extremely doubtful. This was shown 
2 or 3 years ago in the game between 1907 and 
1908. The better team is often defeated in our 
class basketball games. 

Wesleyan, 57; M. A. C, 31. 
Wesleyan experienced little difficulty in defeating 
Massachusetts at Middletown on Dec. II. It 
was the first game of the season for the home team 
and they showed up remarkably well. Our men 
seemed unable to locate the basket properly. Their 
blocking was good however, and Burke especially 
excelled in this line. In the second half Wesleyan 
tried out several substitutes. The game was not 
marked by the spectacular, and long shots were few 
and far between. There was little fouling. Gillett 
starred for Massachusetts in shooting and passing 
and Taylor excelled for Wesleyan in this department. 
The line-up : — 



WESLEYAN. 

Soule. Davis, 1. f. 
Taylor, Kent, r. f. 
White, c. 

Chamberlain. Grant, 1. g. 
Hayward. Moore, r. g 



MASSACHUSETTS 

r. g.. Chase 

1. g.. Cutter 

c. Gillett 

r. f.. Cobb 

1. f.. Burke 



Professor Hasbrouck was called home, just 

before the Christmas recess, by the death of an uncle. 



Goals from floor-Taylor 12, Soule 6, White 8. Hayward. 
Moore. Chamberlain 5, Grant. Gillett 2. Cobb 2. Burke. 
Chase. Goals from fculs— Chamberlain. Gillett. Referee 
and umpire— Charles Carlson. Length of halves— 20 minutes, 
M. A. C.,36; C. A. C, 27. 
The evening after the Wesleyan game Dec. 12, 
the college team defeated the Connecticut agricul- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



77 



tural college at Storrs with a score of 36 to 27. The 
small size of the hall and other peculiar features 
doubtless favored the Connecticut players. Chase 
and Miller did well at throwing baskets and Gillett 
located it easily for fouls. Cobb played his usual good 
game. The line-up : — 

MASSACHUSETTS. CONNECTICUT 

Burke. 1. f. r . g , Bothfeid 

Cobb, r. f. i. g .. Miller 

dibit, c c ., Conzellman 

Cutter. 1. g. r . f„ Waterous 

Chase, r. g L f,, Vance 

Goals from floor — Burke 3. Cobb 4, Gillett, Cutter 2, 

Chase 5, Vance 2, Waterous 2, Conzellman 3, Miller 5. 
Coals from fouls— Gillett 6. Vance 3. 

Dartmouth, 52; M. A. C, 1. 
On Dec. 18, at Hanover, Massachusetts was over- 
whelmingly defeated by Dartmouth, 52 to I . No 
changes were made in the line-ups of either team, 
and the visitors, despite the fact that they could not 
break up the fast and clever pas.; work of the Dart- 
mouth team, played gamely until the final whistle. 
They played a stiff blocking game, but were very 
weak in passing, and seldom got the ball near enough 
their own basket to shoot a field goal. Throughout 
both halves our team played like fiends to keep the 
score down, but again and again Lang would throw 
off his opponent and drop the ball in the basket. 
Captain Grebenstein, for Dartmouth, played a won- 
derful passing game, and did not miss a single chance 
at a goal from the foul line. Dingle played in fine 
form, as did the rest of the team, while Gillett and 
Burke excelled for M. A. C. The line-up : 



DARTMOUTH. 

Grebenstein. r. f. 
Brady. 1. f. 
Lang. c. 
Lane, r. b. 
Dingle. 1. b. 
Score— Dartmouth 52. Massachusetts 



MASSACHUSETTS 

I- b.. Chase 

r. b.. Cutter 

c. Gillett 

"1. f.. Burke 

r. f.. Cobb 

Goals from floor 



—Grebenstein 7, Lang 8. Brady 4. Dingle 3. Lane. Goal: 
from fouls — Grebenstein 6. Gillett. Referee— Ailing. Scorer 
—Brown. Timer— Bolser. Time— 20 and 15 minute 
halves. Attendance — 400. 

M. A. C, 41 ; Amherst Reserves, 15. 
The college team defeated the Amherst Reserves 
on Jan. 4, 41 to 15 in a practice game. For Mass- 
achusetts, Cobb excelled, while for the Reserves 



Hubbard played the best game. The passing of the 
Reserves was poor, and the shooting rather Inferior. 
The passing of the Massachusetts team showed 
improvement, being particularly steady in the first 
half, though perhaps more brilliant in the second. 
The line-up : 

MASSACHUSETTS. RESERVES. 

Burke. 1. f. r . g., Hawkes 

Cobb. r. f. l. g., Morton 

Gillett. c. c.. Hubbard 

Cutter, Neal. 1. g. r . f.. Conley 

Chase, r. g. |. f , Hardy 

Score— Massachusetts, 41. Reserves. 15. Goals from 
floor— Chase 6, Cutter 4. Cobb 4. Gillett 3. Burke 3. Conley 
3. Hubbard 2. Hawkes. Morton, Goals from fouls -Gillett, 
Conley. Referee and umpire— Peters of Massachusetts. 
Time— 20 minute halves. Attendance— 200. 

Springfield H. S., 33; M. A. C, 1910,24. 
The freshman basketball team was defeated Dec. 
15 by the Springfield High school at Springfield with 
a score of 33 to 24. Schermerhorn played best for 
1910. The line-up: 

SPRINGFIELD HIGH. PRESHMtN. 

Robertson, (capt.) I. f. r. g.. Waldron. Hatch 

Scott, r. f. |. g., Leonard, (capt.) 

Parsons, c. c., Schermerhorn 

Granfield. 1. g. r. f.. Woodward 

Crowther. r. g.. 1. f.. Hatch, Newcomb 

Score— Springfield High 33. Freshmen 24. Goals from 
floor— Robertson 4. Scott 7. Granfield 2. Crowther, Parsons, 
Schermerhorn 4, Woodward 3. Hatch, Newcomb. Goals 
from fouls— Parsons 3. Schermerhorn 6. Referee— Messer. 
Umpire— Taylor. Time— 20 minute halves. Attendance — 
300 



ECHOES FROM THE TRUSTEE MEETING. 

President Kenyon L. Butterfield is taking a few 
minutes of the time devoted to chapel services each 
morning to explain the actions and resolutions of the 
trustees of the college at their recent meeting in Bos- 
ton. The changes recommended and to be instituted 
are felt to be much needed by faculty, students and 
all those connected with the college, and are typical 
of the advanced ideas and characteristic energy of the 
new president. Upon recommendation of the board 
of trustees, the office of dean of the college is to be 
created, to take effect at the beginning of the next 
college year. Professor Mills, now treasurer and 
head of the English department, has been appointed 












I 



7« 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



79 



■ t 



to the position of dean, and has accepted. The 
announcement is well received. Professor Mills has 
been with the college for many years, serving it faith- 
fully and well, winning for himself the entire sympathy 
and respect of the students and his compeers on the 
faculty. At the time of assuming his duties as dean 
next September, Professor Mills will relinquish his 
duties as treasurer, retaining, however, his position 
at the head of the English department. 

Another resolution of the trustees provides for the 
establishment of a "professorship of the humanities," 
as it is called. Professor Mills has also been 
appointed to, and accepted, this office. This appoint- 
ment will also take effect next college year. The 
exact and definite duties of the professor of humani- 
ties are yet in the process of consideration, but the 
main object is to correlate certain of the classic and 
"humanity" subjects with the technical subjects and 
sciences taught already in the college curriculum. 
It will eventually lead to a broader, rounder, more 
complete education of the students in their pursuit of 
a technical and directly applicable education. 

The position of treasurer of the college will be 
assigned to a person who is to act in that capacity 
alone, and not, as in the case of Professor Mills, to 
have connection with the teaching force. Some new 
duties will be assigned to the treasurer which hitherto 
have been performed by others, and he will act in 
every way as official business representative of the 
college. 



Colleg? No*tS- 



— Another informal dance will be held at the drill 
hall on the afternoon and evening of the 12th. 

— At a recent mass meeting Mvron W. Thompson 
of Halifax was elected assistant manager of the 1907 
football team. 

— E. F. Hathaway, '09, was detained at his home 
in Cambridge for several day owing to a badly strained 
ligament in his ankle. 

— The senior class has completed the short course 
in bacteriology given by Dr. Paige, and those hours 
are now devoted to political science under Professor 
Holcomb. 



—On Dec. 20, Prof. F. S. Cooley delivered an 
address at Northampton before the convention of the 
Massachusetts Creamery association. 

—During the vacation W. E. Dickinson, '07, was 
engaged in carrying on important physiological experi- 
ments at his home in North Amherst. 

— Among those who have visited college since the 
Christmas recess, no one was more cordially received 
than was H. T. Pierce and J. J. Gardner, '05. 

For the week before the Christmas recess the 

remark of one of the professors that, "A man's heels 
should save his head" seemed very appropriate. 

—The third meeting of the Esperanto club was 
held last Friday evening. These meetings are quite 
well attended and considerable interest seems to be 
manifest in this, the international language. 

—The following elections of the 1907 class-day 
speakers have been made : Ivy poem, A. H. Arm- 
strong; class oration, W. E. Dickinson ; class song, 
E. G. Bartlett ; class ode, C. M. Parker; campus 
oration, W. F. Chace ; pipe oration, G. H. Chapman ; 
hatchet oraMon, J. 0. Chapman. 

During the Christmas recess the following men 

from various institutions visited the college, being 
especially interested in the horticultural department 
and equipment : Prof. A. G. Gulley and E. A. White 
M. A. C, '95, both of Storrs agricultural college, 
Prof. E. C. Sears of Nova Scotia agricultural col- 
lege, and C. S. Pomeroy, assistant horticulturist of 
the Vermont experiment Station. 

The College Senate formerly consisted of four 

seniors and four juniors, but at a recent meeting it 
was decided that, as the presiding officer is invaria- 
bly a senior, fairer representation could be secured 
were there one more member from the upper class. 
The seniors at a special meeting unanimously elected 
J.N. Summers to serve as the fifth member of that 
part of the Senate representing 1907. 

Before one of the recent horticultural seminars 

H. J. Franklin, '03, gave a very interesting and 
instructive lecture on Cranberry Culture, the insect 
pests which attack this crop, and some of the differ- 
ent methods of improving the conditions. Mr. Frank- 
lin spent several months of last year in the heart of 
the Cape Cod cranberry district, studying the plant. 
With these advantages he was able to get a very good 



insight into the business in all its details. To the 
greater part of his hearers, who were unfamiliar with 
the conditions, his description of the making and main- 
tenance of bogs, and everything connected with 
harvesting the crop was of great interest. 

— The Y. M. C. A. handbook of the college made 
its tardy appearance a few days before the vacation. 
It is unique in possessing a semi-flexible black leather 
cover with an embossed seal of the college on the 
front. New features are a blank space fn the middle 
of the book ruled and marked for a schedule and a 
greeting from President Butterfield. An excellent 
half tone engraving of the president also appears. 
The press work especially in the arrangement of type 
is excellent but there are numerous errors both of fact 
and typography. The book is considerably in advance 
of its predecessors and is a most excellent information 
bureau for the college. From its pages the editors of 
the diffuse and formal catalogue may obtain pointers 
for the improvement of their publication. 

— President Butterfield, at the request of the senior 
class, will take time during the balance of the 
semester to deliver to the seniors a series of lectures 
on "Rural sociology." The subjects to be treated 
are as follows: "What is the rural problem?" 
"Effects of country life on individual and national 
character," "Movement of rural population," "Mean- 
ing of rural isolation and its remedies," "Farmers' 
organizations," "Rural and agricultural education," 
"Rural religious institutes," "Leadership in country 
life," "Agriculture in New England. " Inhiswork 
at Michigan agricultural college, President Butter- 
field was particularly interested in questions of rural 
life, and has since been recognized as an authority on 
sociological questions, especially as they concern rur?l 

life. The course Is much valued by those taking it. 

«. 

THE HONOR SYSTEM. 

About two years ago the Amherst Student made a 
considerable agitation which resulted in the establish- 
ment of the honor system at Amherst college. So 
much has been said and written upon this subject that 
any explanation of terms seems superfluous. Suffice 
to say that it has been adopted at a few large insti- 
tutions with alleged success. We understand that 
some members of our faculty desire to see it adopted 
here. We are very much inclined to believe however 



that it would fail in its application. There is a strong 
sentiment among our students against informing any 
breach of the conditions governing the system and this 
alone is fatal. Again to be quite frank the lower 
class students will not trust their instructor to carry 
out his part of the agreement. This is a very 
lamentable fact, but during tbe first two years of the 
college courses where all or practically all of the crib 
bing is done, written examinations are a skirmish 
between teacher and scholar and little mercy is shown 
on either side. However much this Is to be regretted 
it is a real fact and it is no use to side-step it when 
discussing the practicability of the honor system. 
No, the student body of this college as of most col- 
leges is not ready for the honor system. When public 
and private life is full of graft and corruption it is folly 
to suppose that college life will not be influenced in the 
same direction. 

This should not prevent us from stopping cribbing 
which is the real f iz\ox. It does not seem necessary 
to go through the formality of a written promise or to 
require that the person in charge of an examination 
should leave the room. It does not seem a stupend- 
ous task to say to oneself : — "I will hereafter do no 
more cribbing" and then and there to stop. Does the 
honor system require anything more or less? We 
cannot see that it does. 

Sometime ago a student, one of those men who 
would flunk out rather than crib in the greatest 
emergency asked us to express the Signal's attitude 
on this subject. Of course there is but one position 
to assume. Under no circumstances can cribbing be 
countenanced. Take the case of the person just 
referred to. Is it fair for most of that man's class- 
mates to pass around papers during the examination 
hours to surreptitiously consult hidden text books and 
in general to squeeze through the exam, while the 
honest student is perhaps ignominiously stuck? These 
dishonest and cheating crlbbers rise high in the 
different professors' opinions while a few, because of 
their honesty, are set down in the bad books of the 
instructor, to be quizzed and cross-examined and 
called up every day in recitations and sometimes 
exposed to ridicule. It is time to eliminate the 
"pernicious habit." Let us rise up and, without the 
fantasy and red tape of the honor system refuse to 
tolerate it longer. 






8o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



81 



THE ESPERANTO CLUB. 

The Esperanto club at M. A. C. seems to have 
become a permanent institution. Not only have sev- 
eral interesting and encouraging meetings of the club 
been held, for the purposes of organization and intro- 
duction to the work, but steps have been taken to 
secure considerable outside help. This evening the 
regular meeting of the club will be held in the chapel, 
and will be addressed by Rev. M. A. Johnson of 
Northampton. The lecturer is well acquainted with 
the subject, having spoken on Esperanto a number of 
times before audiences in Northampton, Springfield 
and other places. Mr. Johnson has also given les- 
sons at the Bay Path institute in Springfield. It is 
hoped by this meeting to arouse more enthusiasm in 
the subject and to interest some new men who may 
not have had the matter brought sufficiently to their 

attention before. 

The plan for the future is to work cooperatively in 
the study of the language. It is unfortunate, on some 
accounts, that there is no one here who is sufficiently 
well acquainted with the language to act as teacher, 
but, on the other hand, the learning of it is so simple 
that It can be easily mastered without such instruc- 
tion. It is hoped, also, to obtain more help from the , 
officers of the association in Boston, who have kindly 
offered their services. 

There are some members of the college who still 
disparage the value of the language practically, and 
who take no interest in the matter, but a thorough 
study of the aims, history and purposes of Esperanto 
should convince anyone that it is the coming 
commercial and diplomatic language. To a gradu- 
ate of a scientific and practical institution like this it 
should be of especial interest. It is believed by 
many that the time is not far off when Esperanto wilt 
be used ail over the world in business and in all com- 
munication between different peoples. What could 
help more to bring about a closer bond of fellowship 
and a more brotherly feeling than a common tongue? 



clubs have been formed all over the country, in col- 
leges like Dartmouth, Harvard, Brown, Wesleyan, 
Worcester Tech. and Massachusetts Tech., all goes to 
show that Esperanto has come to stay. 



SCIENTISTS MEET. 

During the latter part of Christmas week the 
American society for the promotion of science con- 
vened in New York city. This society is made up of 
different organizations interested in the several fields 
of scientific research and study. On Dec. 28 and 29 
the Economic Entomologists met at Columbia univer- 
sity. This association is of peculiar interest to us 
because of the large number of M. A. C. men present. 
These included the following : H. T. Fernald of Am- 
herst, R. I. Smith of Atlanta, Ga., E. P. Felt of 
Albany, N. Y., H. L. Frost and A. H. Kirkland of 
Boston, A. F. Burgess of Columbus, Ohio, H. E. 
Hodgkiss of Geneva, N. Y., E. A. Back of Amherst, 
F. J. Smith of Brooklyn, N. Y., W. E. Hinds and 
W. A. Hooker of Dallas, Tex. 

The retiring president, A. H. Kirkland, '94, deliv- 
ered an address on "a great experiment in applied 
entomology" which is the gypsy moth work in this 
state, and Messrs. Fernald, Smith, Felt, Burgess, 
Hodgkiss and Hooker also read papers. Mr. Burgess 
was re-elected secretary and treasurer of the associa- 
tion. In the evening through the efforts of Doctor 
Fernald eight of the M. A. C. alumni present met 
and took dinner together. Anecdotes of student days 
and suggestions for the welfare of the college were in 

order. 

One prominent fact was brought out in this 
informal gathering and that is that few of the students 
realize the vast advantages offered to them here. 
They persist in looking at affairs from a very limited 
range and often allow petty provocations against an 
instructor or course to unduly influence their opinion 
the college and its efficiency. It is only after 



of 

graduation that one can realize the true significance 

of things and not until then is the average man really 

It is with this idea that the Christian Endeavor society and truly proud of his alma mater. Another matter 

,s officially interested, and is helping to push the which came up was the remarkably small number of 



great work. After the ignominious downfall of Vola- 
puk, people are at first apt to smile at any attempt at 
an arbitrary international language. But the fact that 
Esperanto is not arbitrary in the least, and that its 



agricultural college graduates who are able to take up 
the experiment station work which has been acceler- 
ated by the passage of the Adams bill. It is said 
that graduates of classical colleges with no practical 
experience are being sought for this work, which is a 



D^paftrnfirf [Sloths. 



tsperanio ib nu> «i" 11 ""; - ' — ■ — - ,, ,- , - 

adherents are growing in number every day, and that | remarkable state of affairs. 



The Christmas recess again causes a scarcity of 
department notes, in view of which the department 
editor will take it upon himself to cover the recent 
actions and resolutions of the board of trustees as 
they may affect established departments, and create 
new ones. However, there are a few notes to be 
mentioned first. 

Extensive repairs have been going on during vaca- 
tion at the Chemical laboratory and the West Experi- 
ment station. In the Chemical building, new floors 
have been laid, tables refitted, and some varnishing 
done. In the West Experiment station, in Dr. 
Goessmann's department, floors have been relaid, 
tables retopped, some of them being covered with 
cement for work in analysis, some of the old hoods 
have been torn out, and replaced by new ones, and 
electric lights installed. 

Work has progressed rapidly on the two new build- 
ings, the barn and Clark hall. The stock-barn has 
been completed externally, with windows and other 
enclosing features. The milk-house attached has 
also been at last completely enclosed, so that now the 
masonry work stands almost, if not quite, complete. 
The masonry work on Clark hall is also finished, the 
building roofed in, and completely slated. The 
extreme mild weather at this time of the year has 
aided operations considerably. Both give still greater 
promises every day of being beautiful and substantial 
buildings, typical of what their kind should be at an 
institution such as ours. 

The various deprrtment heads have been "in it to 
the elbow" with work on the year's Report of the 
Experiment Station, which may also account for the 
absence of the usual department activity in other 
matters. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

E. A. Back and H. J. Franklin devoted the Christ- 
mas recess to studying the insects in the large collec- 
tions at New York, Philadelphia and Washington. 

A bulletin on the New Oriental Moth is now in 
press, and will shortly be issued. It contains a map 
of the infested territory, and a half-tone plate of the 
insect in its different stages, together with descriptions 
of the various stages, an account of what is known 
about it in Asia, its food plants, etc. The bulletin as 



a whole is a summary of our present knowledge of 
this insect both in the old world and in Massachusetts. 

The Asparagus Root Miner has recently been 
received from Concord, where it appears to be very 
abundant and is doing considerable damage, and it 
has also been discovered at Amherst. These are the 
first reports of this insect in Massachusetts, and a 
study of its life history and methods of control will 
bfe a subject for investigation the coming spring, very 
little being yet known about it. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Professor Waugh delivered a lecture on Dec. 15. 
before the School Garden Conference held under the 
auspices of the Massachusetts H orticulturil society at 
Horticultural hall, Boston. His subject was "Horti- 
cultural Education for School Garden Teachers." In 
the crop report for October of the Massachusetts State 
Board of Agriculture appears an article by Professor 
Waugh on Peach Culture. A brief outline of para- 
graphs is as fellows : Soils and Exposures, Planting 
Distances, Cultivation, Fertilizers, Pruning, Diseases 
and Difficulties, Handling the Crop, and Varieties 
adapted to New England conditions. 

At a meeting of the junior class in horticulture last 
week the following question was debated by members 
of the class: "Resolved, That the Hitching's system 
of orchard management is worthy of general adop- 
tion." The affirmative was supported by H. T. 
Wheeler and Paul Davis, and the negative by S. J. 
Wright and W. S. Regan. The debate was decided 
in the negative, both on the merits of the debate and 
the merits of the queston. J. R. Parker acted as 
literary critic of the debate and W. F. Sawyer criti- 
cised from a horticultural point of view. Reports 
from various members of the class upon cover crops 
for the orchard were then made, many authorities 
being quoted. 

MARKET GARDENING. 

Definite arrangements have at last been made to 
fill the place of M. A. Blake, instructor in horticul- 
ture and general supervisor of field work in horticul- 
ture. Mr. Blake went the first part of December to 
the New Jersey agricultural college, incorporated with 
Rutgers college, to fill the position of professor of hor- 
ticulture. Hissuccessor's work will be divided between 
two men, an instructor in market gardening and super- 
visor of the field work, and a professor in pomology. A 



■L 






82 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



83 






man for the latter position has not as yet been chosen, 
though several have been interviewed. This matter 
will probably be delayed until commencement. But 
for the former position, that of instructor in market gar- 
dening and supervisor of field work, Harold F. Thomp- 
son, 1905, has been chosen. Thompson has lately 
been teaching agricultural and allied subjects at Mount 
Hermon school, Northfield, where his services won 
such favor that he was lately asked to take charge of 
the whole agricultural department. 
REVISED LIST OF STOCKBR1DGE CLUB 
APPOINTMENTS. 

Jan. 15, E. D. Howe of Marlboro. 

29, G. D. Leavens of New York city. 
Feb. 12, F. S. Peer of Greenfield. 

26, J. W. Sanborn of Gilmantown, N. H. 
March 12, W. R. Kinney of Worcester. 

19, P. M. Harwood of Boston. 
April 9, J. S. Ellsworth of Boston. 

23, J. H. Robinson of Boston. 
May 7, G. W. Field of Boston. 

21, W. H. Caldwell of Petersboro, N. H. 



NOTICE ALUMNI t 
The 1908 junior prom, will be held Feb. 15, 
1907. For particulars and invitations address 

J. Robert Parker, 

Amherst, Mass. 

In commenting upon the dinner of the New York 
alumni club last month President Butterfield spoke of 
the comparatively few recent graduates present. We 
are told that this occurs at all alumni meetings except 
in the case of the local association. It is certainly 
to be regretted that the younger alumni do not turn 
out better. Being, as they are, well acquainted with 
the college as it exists today they would have a bene- 
ficial effect upon the various associations and would 
serve as a sort of connecting link between student 
and alumnus. The passing of time during the last 
ten years has turned the "Aggie" of '97 into the 
Massachusetts of '07 and far too many of the older 
graduates do not realize how greatly circumstances 
have changed. It needs all the effort of some of the 
men who were in college during the last decade to 
maintain good team-work between graduates and 
undergraduates. Everybody out for Mass'chusetts ! 



The alumni annual is now out, after remaining at 
the printing office for nearly two months, on account 
of illness on the printing staff and the scarcity of help. 
>73._Seth S. Warner of Northampton lectured 
before the Stockbridge club, Dec. 11, 1906, on fer- 
tilizers. Mr. Warner spoke of the important work 
of President Stockbridge in carrying through laws 
regulating the sale of fertilizers and establishing a 
state chemist. He also spoke of the great work of 
Dr. Goessman. 

'82.— Henry S. Brodt died in December, 1906, at 
Rawlins, Wyoming, at the age of 44 years. 

'84. — E. A. Jones recently visited college, and 
left an order for some dwarf fruit trees. 

'86.— R. B. Mackintosh, 21 Abour St., Peabody, 
is doing special work in Botany and Ornithology. 
He is a recognized authority on fleshy fungi, and has 
taken charge of mushroom meetings at Essex Insti- 
tute, Salem. He is a member of the New England 
Bot. club, Boston Mycological club, and the Appala- 
chian Mountain club. Mr. Mackintosh has kindly 
offered to contribute to the college herbarium mush- 
rooms and fleshy fungi. 

'87.— E. F. Richardson of Millis has qualified to 
fill out the unexpired term of the late Norfolk 
county commissioner. 

'88.— Dr. G. W. Cutler of Bridgewater, with his 
brother, lias bought a farm in Scotland, and is going 
into the poultry business. 

'89. _A. D. Copeland of Campello is superintend- 
ant of the cattle department in the Brockton fair. 

'89.— R. P. Sellew, New England representative 
of the J. W. Biles Feed company of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, visited Amherst recently. His headquarters 
are in Boston. 

'92. —George B. Willard, elected city auditor of 
Waltham, assumed the duties of that office Sept. 
1, 1906. 

»93. — At the recent annual meeting of the Cleve- 
land Homeopathic Medical society, Dr. H. F. Staples 
was elected president for the ensuing year. 

'95. __H. A. Ballou has decided to remain in the 
West Indies, and has accepted a reappontment. 

'97.— L. F. Clark, 1437 Seventh street, Des 
Moines, la. 



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All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 

f. #~Full Dreaa Suits to rent. «-.StudenU' Clothe* bought. 



11 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 
best in the market. 

NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



'97. — George D. Leavens, second vice-president 
and agricultural expert for the Coe- Mortimer Co. at 
133-137 Front St., New York, has recently published 
an illustrated pamphlet on fertilizers for tobacco. 

'98. — Samuel W. Wiley has opened an office in 
the Lobe Building, 15 South Gay street, Baltimore, 
Md., under the firm name of Wiley and Hoffman. 
He is nicely located in the heart of the city and is 
prepared to test milk, water, fertilizers, minerals, etc. 
The firm is especially equipped to sample and test 
cargoes of phosphate rock and pyrites at any hour 
of the day or night, as they have sworn samplers and 
weighers upon whom they can depend. Mr. Wiley's 
home address is '-The Kenilworth," 339 Bloom St., 
Baltimore, Md. 

Ex-*98.— Dr. Thomas H. Charmbury has a dental 
office at 819 North Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 

'99.— W. E. Hinds and W. A. Hooker, both of 
Dallas, Tex., visited college recently. 

'99. — Melvin H. Pingree has resigned his position 
in the Experiment Station at the Pennsylvania State 
college, and gone to Baltimore, Md., where he is in 
full charge of the laboratory of the American Agricul- 
tural Chemical company, with three assistants, a 

position held by S. W. Wiley, '98, for the past four 
years. 

'00.— J. E. Halligan of the Sugar Experiment 
Station, New Orleans, has just published two bulletins, 
one on fertilizers, and one on feed-stuffs, both show 
ing the thorough, conscientious work which he Is 
doing. 

'00.— J. W. Kellogg leaves Atlanta Feb. I to 
take charge of the feed and inspection work at the 
New Jersey Experiment Station. 

Ex- '00.— Dana S. B. Greeley, who after leaving 
our college for Cornell university has had a very 
extensive experience in California, Colorado, Mexico 
and Peru, investigating the mining industries, is 
about to go to Colorado and open up a gold mine 
which looks very promising. His present address is 
503 West 81st street, New York. 

'01. — N. D. Hunting is again with us as short- 
course instructor. 

'01. — R. I. Smith, State Entomologist of Georgia, 
visited college at Christmas time. 



I 



I 



84 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'02.— T. M. Carpenter recently visited Amherst 
for several days. He and Dr. Benedict, who have 
both been working at Wesleyan, will soon sever con- 
nection with the United States government, and are 
to work in the new Carnegie laboratory, probably to 
be erected in Boston, with the respiration calorimeter. 
Mr. Carnegie has given money enough to erect a very 
satisfactory building and to continue the work for ten 
years. Mr. Carpenter is making a thorough study of 
this important subject ; and is one of the very few 
experts in this line of work in the country. 

'02.— Howard L. Knight, 1152 Seventeenth St., 
Washington, D. C. 

'02.— D. Nelson West, Roslyn, Long Island, N. Y. 

'03.— A boy, Kenneth Hunt Monahan, on Dec. 10, 
1906, appeared in the home of Mr. and Mrs. N. F. 
Monahan of North Amherst. 

'04. — Back, Couden, Griffin, Henshaw, and White 
spent an enjoyable evening together in Washington, 

Dec. 20. 

'04. — The Kansas people, as we are told in the 
Students' Herald, of the Kansas State Agricultural 
college, are very proud of M. F. Ahern. Going to 
Manhattan a little over two years ago, as foreman of 
the college greenhouses, he was selected as football 
and baseball coach, and through his earnest, untiring 
efforts, some very fast teams have been developed. 

•04.— R. R. Raymoth, formerly city forester at 
Evansville, Ohio, has accepted the position of travel- 
ing salesman for the Evansville Stove company. Mr. 
Raymoth assumed his new duties on Jan. 1, traveling 
through the Southern states. 

'05.— F. A. Bartlett visited college recently. 

'05.— Harold F. Thompson has been appointed 
instructor in market gardening and director of field 
work in the place of Mr. Blake. 

♦05. — J. J. Gardner has been spending a number 
of days at college recently. 

'05.— F. L. Yeaw, Yuba City, Cal. 

'06.— F. C. Pray, Belmonte, Cuba. 

E X . '07. — Waldo D. Barlow, at present an instruc- 
tor in the Kamehameha school at Honolulu, Hawaii, 
intends to return to Amherst next August. In Sep- 
tember he intends to enter the class of 1909 to com- 
plete his four years course at the college. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for iU popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

KINK CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

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THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 

Most Attractive Cafe in New England. 

1'rivate Dining Koonis for Ladies and Theatre TarticH. 

Class and Fraternity Banquets a specialty. 

Try our Special Sunday Dinners, 5 i\ m. to 8.30 p. m., 50c. 

When in town give us a trial and lie convinced. 

Open until midnight. 

EDWARD A. LEWIS, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - - Holtoke, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



AMHERST HOUSE, 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Kratcr- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



Rabar's Jim, 

Old Sooth Street, off Main, - NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautifnl Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 FEB. DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with as. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 23. 1907 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student, and Alumni are reouestedto contribute. Communication, .hould be address. Cou-.c. S.onal. A-hmst. Mass. Th« S.gmm wUI be 
sen,* all subscriber, untiMt, discont .nuance i. ordered and arrears are paid. Subscriber, who do not rece-ve their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. — ■ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 
RALPH JEROME WATTS. 1907. Business Manager. 
DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908. Assistant Editor. 
JOHN ROBERT PARKER. 1908. Assistant Business Manager. 

ARTHUR W.LL.AM H.CC1NS. ,907. Alumni Note,. ROLAL^E^ERBECK'TJor 07 ' 

JOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes. * O LAI JD HA1 -E VERB EC K. 1908. 

GEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR.. 1909. ALLAN DANA FARRAR. 1908. 

ORWELL BURLTON BRIGGS. 1909. ( 



fenM. 11.00 par asar ia adsaoca. Single Copie.. 10c. Postage outside al United States and Canada. 2 5c artra. 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Reading-Room Association. 

Basket-ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



C. H. White. Pres. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
J.N. Summers. Sec. 
E. D. PhHbrick. Manager. 



Athene Association. 

Base- Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. See 
T. A. Barry, Managei. 
K. E. Gillett. Managei. 
F. C. Peters. Pre,. 
E G Bartlett, Manager. 



Entered a* second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



The sums asked of the General Court by the col- 
lege this year are large but a perusal of the detailed 
statements will show that the money is badly needed 
and the progress of the bill will be closely watched. 
We hope that if any students or alumni have an 
opportunity to assist in the work, they will exert all 
of the influence at their command. 



We are not aware that the board of trustees has as 
yet taken any official action upon a memorial for the 
late President Goodell. This seeming apathy is 
beginning to cause editorial comment among the local 
papers and the question might well be considered at 
the next meeting. Obviously we need some tempor- 
ary mark of respect to stand until we have a memor- 
ial library dedicated to "Prexy Goodell." 



to assistant editor as a more appropriate designation 
of the work which he has been doing. He will con- 
tinue to write department notes as heretofore. Mr. 
Verbeck will edit a new column devoted to the vari- 
ous clubs, seminars and the Y. M. C. A. The 
rapid increase of these activities among the students 
during the past year seems to call for a special 
department reserved for such news. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



A Slight chan je has been made in the appoint- 
ments of The Signal. Mr. Miller has been advanced 



It is with pleasure that we note the appointment of 
Professor Mills as dean of the college. His long and 
faithful services as the head of the English depart- 
ment and as treasurer surely entitle him to an easing 
of his duties and we are positive that his talents and 
abilities will have a new opportunity to show them- 
selves as professor of the humanities. The concen- 
trating of these allied but hitherto scattered subjects 
under one department will far better subserve the 
best interests of the college and under the guidance 
of Professor Mills will no doubt be enlarged both In 
usefulness and scope. We feel confident that the 
students and alumni of the college will unite with The 



i 



86 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



87 




Signal in extending congratulations to the venerable 
professor upon this occasion. 



The approach of the frat-rushing season is viewed 
with apprehension by those students who have the 
best interest of the college at heart. The limited 
time allowed this year will doubtless intensify the 
rivalry and during the eventful four days the fresh- 
men will no doubt pass through a delightful and 
never-to-be-forgottan period of feasting and petting. 
This is as it should be. The Signal only puts the 
freshmen "wise" once more and warns them to look 
before they leap. The selection of a frat. is a ser- 
ious matter and no chances for vain regrets in the 
future should be taken. To the members of the 
different societies The Signal urges a strict obser- 
vance of the rushing rules published in these columns 
sometime since and moreover a courteous treatment 
of rival fraternities. Spreading malicious lies and 
other chicane methods only reflect discreditably 
upon the people responsible for them and stir up much 
factional spirit at the expense of college spirit. 
Finally after it is all over and the smoke has cleared 
away let everyone remember that whatever fraternity 
barriers may have arisen and however much we may 
segregated into different cliques : — "Bay State's loyal 
sons are we/' 



Before the appearance of the next Signal the 
final examinations will be nearly or quite over. Most 
of us after an extremely uncomfortable period of 
anxiety and worry will have "passed" and will be 
advanced another step on the road which leadeth to 
our commencement. A few will have been ignomini- 
ously "stuck" and we shall see their faces no more. 
Some of the instructors have established a precedent 
by giving the finals of their course before the end of 
the semester. This seems an excellent plan espec- 
ially for those subjects of the first two years which 
run through without change until June. It relieves 
the freshmen and sophomores of much nervous ten- 
sion at the mid-years and we hope to see it more 
widely adopted. Another improvement would be to 
publish the schedule of examinations in the last Sig- 
nal appearing before they occur. Other colleges do 
this quite frequently, the most notable examples 
being Tufts and M. I. T. We noted that The Tech 



this year printed a provisional schedule of examina- 
tions 17 days before some of them occurred. Thus 
the students are enabled to plan out their work in 
studying and the maddening uncertainty which pre- 
vails here until the last moment, when the the sched- 
ule is posted, is avoided. The arrangement being 
subject to change could apparently be as well ready 
on Jan. 19, as a week later. We suggest that this 
plan be considered by the authorities ere another 
season of examinations comes around. 

/Athletic Notes- 

BASKETBALL. 

During the past two weeks, two more games have 
been played and won, and as yet we have received no 
defeat on the home floor. This record seems likely 
to be kept up throughout the season, for the "Varsity" 
is coming fast, and both Vermont and Brown will 
have to hustle to defeat us on our own floor. It is a 
long time since we have beaten Brown, but now the 
chance is before us, and with hard practice we can 
turn the trick. The team has shown an improvement 
in passing and blocking, and now plays as fast a floor 
game as any team in the vicinity. In the past two 
games Burke has shown the best eye for the 
basket, having scored five in each. He has also 
scored the most baskets for the season, so far, get- 
ting 18 goals in 7 games. Cobb, at right forward. 
has played fast throughout the season, and has thus 
far done the best passing. His strong point in shoot- 
ing is on long shots, most of which he makes with 
one hand. Giliett at center has also been a great 
help to the team in shooting goals, and has scored 
nearly as many as Burke. Cutter and Chase at 
guard both play an aggressive game in the backfield. 
and both have shown good scoring qualities besides. 
The management has found it necessary to m^ke 
a few changes in the schedule, and it bids fair tn»' be- 
come stronger than before. At the request of the 
manager of the University of Vermont ttam the game 
scheduled at Amherst will be changed from February 
26th to the 25th. Rensselaer Polytechnic institute 
has cancelled the game for February 28 at Troy. 
The manager is trying to get a game with one of the 
colleges situated in that locality to take the place of 



the "shut-eye" at Rensselaer. Besides the contest 
on last Saturday with Lowell textile school, games 
with Gardner A. C. at Gardner Jan. 22, and with the 
40th separate company at Ogdensburg, N. Y., for 
March 1 , have been arranged. 

The freshman team still continues to play a fast 
game, although it has not won any as yet, and is 
getting good practice against high school teams in the 
vicinity. The team has been handicapped, however, 
by the absence of Chase, who is playing on the 
" Varsity." Their final game with 1909 promises to 
be very interesting, and unless the signs prove false, 
the score will be very close. At the same time the 
sophomores appear not to be worrying much over 
their chances. 

Massachusetts, 32; W. P. I., 19. 

In an exciting contest on Jan. 9 Massachusetts 
defeated Worcester "Tech." 32 to 19. The game 
was well-fought, especially in the second half, when 
the "Tech" team braced and scored 15 points to its 
opponent's 10. During the first half Massachusetts 
played by far the better game, getting 22 points to 
"Tech's" 4. Both teams exhibited good passing 
throughout, that of the home team being somewhat 
superior. 

The game started off fast and although Massachu- 
setts scored frequently at first, the Worcester boys 
played an aggressive game and at times had the ball 
in their opponent's territory for quite awhile, but were 
unable to successfully locate the netting. In the 
second half, Fitzpatrick of -'Tech." was especially 
conspicuous, and some of the goals were scored from 
close to the sidelines. Two long shots by Cobb in the 
second half added to the spectacular side of the 
game, while his blocking was the best seen so far this 
season. Burke led the home team in shooting and 
also did some fine passing. 

The line-up : — 

MASSACHUSETTS. WORCESTER "TECH " 

Burke. 1. f. >"• g- Atherton 

Cobb. r. f. 1- g • Pease 

Giliett. c. c.. Lawley 

Cutter. Neal. 1. g. r. g.. Fitzpatrick 

Chase, r. g. ' '■■ Peters 

Score—Massachusetts 32. "Tech " 10. Goals from floor 
—Burke 5. Fitzpatrick 5. Giliett 4. Chase 3, Cutter 2. Pease 
2. Cobb 2, Atherton. Lawley. Goal from foul— Lawley. 
Referee and umpire— Peters of Massachusetts. Timers— 
Thurston of Massachusetts and Law of •Tech." Time— 20- 
minute halves. Attendance — 400. 



Massachusetts, 26; Cushing, 18. 

Before a crowd of 400 enthusiastic visitors, many of 
whom were from "over the mount," Massachusetts 
sent Cushing down to defeat by the score of 26-18. 
The victory was all the more pleasing because the 
Cushing five had defeated the fast Yale team by 
nearly the same score only a week previous. 

The first half saw most of the scoring, ending 18 to 
1 1 in favor of the home team. In the second half 
Massachusetts scored 8 points to Cushing's 7. The 
home team committed many fouls in the first half and 
Cushing lost a fine chance by not scoring more points 
on them. In the second half there was very little 
fouling. The game was fast and clean throughout. 
Burke started the scoring and he and Cutter by some 
fine shooting gave Massachusetts a lead that she held 
throughout although Cushing all but passed her several 
times. Burke led both teams in shooting with 5 
goals, but was closely followed by Captain Loeber of 
Cushing who scored 4. Cobb and Cutter also played 
well especially in blocking and passing. 

The line-up : — 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Burke, 1. f. 

Cobb, r. f. 

Giliett, c. 

Cutter. 1. g. 

Chase, r. g. 

Score — Massachusetts 26. Cushing 18. 

— Burke 5, Loeber 4. Cutter 3, Cobb 2, 

Reardon. Howard. Foresman. Goals from fouls— Loeber 2, 

Reardon2. Referee — Spring of Amherst. Time— 20-minute 

halves. 

Lowell T. S., 17; M. A. C, 6. 

Massachusetts was defeated by the Lowell textile 

schcol basketball team at Lowell, on last Saturday 

evening, the score being 17 to 6. Our team played 

well during the early portion of the first half, but the 

pace soon became too fast for them. Holden for 

Lowell showed a good eye for the basket and Chase 

played well for M. A. C. The line-up :— 

Holden. r. f. 
Bunce. 1. f. 
Gay. Fiske. c. 
Stott. Stersberg. r. b. 
Farr, 1. b. 

Score— Lowell textile 17. Massachusetts. 6. 
floor— Holden 4. Gay. Stott, Cutter. Chase. 



I. 



CUSHING. 

r. g., Kelley 

Reardon 

c. Loeber 

r. f . Foresman 

1. f.. Howard 

Goals from floor 

Chase 2. Giliett, 



I. b.. Cutter 

r. b.. Chase 

c, Giliett 

1. f.. Burke 

r.f.. Cobb 

Goals from 
Cobb. Goals 
from fouls— Bunce 5. Referee— James F. Thorpe. Timers 
— Philbrick and Varnum. Time— 20m halves. 






88 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1910, 15; Holyoke H. S., 15. 

The freshmen and Holyoke high school played a 
tie game at the drill hall Jan. 10 in an overtime affair. 
When the whistle blew the score stood 13-13, and it 
was agreed to play a three-minute period extra. In 
this period, after Holyoke had scored, Schermerhorn 
caged a goal just before the time ended, and the game 
was left a tie. Schermerhorn and Woodward ex- 
celled for the freshmen, although Newcomb scored a 
sensational basket in the first period. This was the 
first home game for 1910, and most of the class 
turned out to cheer them on. 

The line-up : — 

Freshmen. holyoke. 

Woodward. 1. f. r . b.. Lynch 

Newcomb, r. f. l. D .. Flanagan 

Schermerhorn, c. c. O'Niel (capt.) 

Leonard. I. b. r . f.. Reed 

Chase (capt ). r. b. l. f., O'Shea 

Score— 1910 15. H. H. S. 15. Coals from floor— Wood- 
ward 2. Schermerhorn 2. Newcomb, Chase. Holyoke 8*. 
Goals from foul — Schermerhorn, Holyoke. Referee — Burke 
of Massachusetts. Time — 15-minute halves. Attendance — 
200. 

•One goal scored in opponnent's basket. 

The freshman basketball team was defeated Jan. 
19 by the Northampton Y. M. C. A. team with a 
score of 5 1 to 2 1 . 



THE SHORT COURSE. 

Under a "Massachusetts agricultural college" 
heading the Republican says : — 

**A few interesting statistics have been obtained of 
the short course for special students which began the 
2d. Thirty-one men and one woman are taking the 
course, somewhat of a decrease over last year, being 
partially due to lack of sufficient room. The greater 
part of the short course men are from Massachusetts, 
though other states are represented. Two of the class 
are graduates of Harvard. One young man has 
recently been attending the Clarke school for the deaf 
and dumb at Northampton." 

A further investigation shows that about one half of 
the class have had more or less high school training. 
Many come from the farm and expect to return there, 
others think of pursuing special dairy work, while a 
few come enly to secure a general insight into agri- 



cultural subjects with the possibility of a future occupa- 
tion along this line. With these facts in view The 
Signal has attempted to analyze the course as at 
present arranged and to comment upon its practica- 
bility in a few words. 

It is not long since the writer heard a prominent 
member of the faculty say : "To me the course seems 
of very doubtful utility." We present facts to sub- 
stantiate this statement. The lectures given in the 
course are incomprehensible to many whose higher 
education has been neglected. This may seem a 
humorous remark but we all know that college profes- 
sors get into the habit of using, in the class-room at 
least, words and expressions which are unintelligible 
to ordinary people. Then too it is necessary to 
delegate much of the teaching to young instructors, 
possibly students, when the work is of so concentrated 
a nature as to require skilled professional instruction. 
In support of this argument we have conversed with 
some of the college men in the present short course 
and have learned that the scientific lectures are too 
deep for even them to grasp. If graduates or students 
at the universities are unable to master this feature of 
the work what about those men who have had no 
such advantages? 

We believe too that some of these short course 
people have worked a great deal of injury to the col- 
lege by posing as graduates of the four years' course. 
We have been told that farmers both in Massachu- 
setts and Connecticut have been deluded In this way 
and that the unsatisfactory results have "queered" 
M. A. C. in certain localities. While no statistics 
are at hand it is commonly believed that few derive 
much benefit from the course. It is a notorious fact 
that few are able at its close to pass the examination 
which allows one to operate the Babcock test and 
which is one of the cardinal points of dairy education. 
As for the certificates awarded the instructors tell us 
that they are withheld only in cases of monumental 
stupidity. 

The Signal does not advocate the abolition of the 
ten weeks' course but it does recommend and insist 
upon a radical change in the methods of instruction. 
Either some sort of entrance and definite graduation 
requirements must be made or else the manual work 
in the dairy laboratory must be given even greater 
importance. The college cannot at the same time 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



cater to the educated and uneducated man and cir- 
cumstances go to prove that this plan followed in the 
past is responsible for the present situation. We are 
not prepared to say just what should be done to rectify 
matters but it is now evident that neither the college 
nor anyone else is getting an adequate return from the 
time and money Involved in the maintenance of the 
course. 




— The last proof for the 1908 Index has been re- 
turned to the printer. 

— Among those who have visited college recently 
were J. F. Lyman, '05, and A. L. Peck, '04. 

— The short dairy course now numbers thirty-six, 
one of the largest classes of the kind ever enrolled at 
the college. 

— Last Friday, President Butterfield commented 
on the life and character of Robert E. Lee at the 
chapel exercises. 

— The Junior class elected R. H. Verbeck to The 
Signal board, to fill the vacancy caused by E. D. 
Philbrick's resignation. 

— At the recent basket-ball game here with the 
Cushing academy team, the visitors were cheered by a 
delegation of Cushing alumnae from Mt. Holyoke 
college. 

— On January 17 Professor Cooley spoke at Hart- 
ford, Conn., before the Connecticut dairyman's asso- 
ciation, his subject being "The One Hundred Dollar 
Cow." 

— The pomology class recently enjoyed the study 
of a box of fancy New York apples sent by Richard 
Wellington '06, from the winter exhibition of the 
New York State Fruit Growers' association. 

— We are informed that the Commandant has de- 
cided to hereafter require all freshmen to purchase 
new uniforms. This will have a depressive effect on 
the market for second-hand private uniforms in com- 
ing years. 

— Dr. Charles A. Goessmann has received the an- 
nouncement of his election as a member of the na- 
tional historical and biographical society at a recent 
meeting of the trustees of that organization in New 
York city. 



— During the past two weeks the college clock has 
indicated the greatest vagaries in time keeping, and 
has stopped altogether once or twice. The clock is 
of excellent construction, and it seems as if with 
proper care it should keep accurate time. 

— At the recent election of officers in the Amherst 
Grange Professor Waugh was chosen Master and 
Edward Gaskill, '06, Overseer. Professor and Mrs. 
Waugh were the official delegates to the state 
grange which met in Boston Dec. 11, 12 and 13. 

— At a recent meeting of the state board of agri- 
culture in Boston the college was represented by 
President Butterfield, Dr. H. T. Fernald and Prof. 
F. A. Waugh. President Butterfield is ex-offlcio a 
member of the board. Dr. Fernald is the nursery 
inspector appointed by the board, and Prof. Wau^h 
is the official pomologist. 

—The speakers at the last two Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ings were Don S. Gates, college secretary of the as- 
sociation for Massachusetts, and Judge Robert W. 
Lyman, 71, of Northampton. Mr. Gates spoke 
upon Athletics, presenting the subject in an entirely 
different light from its usual consideration, and Judge 
Lyman described a trip taken by him to California. 

— While J. T. Caruthers, a lieutenant in Company 
C, was instructing in Butts' manual drill recently, the 
rifle of another student came in violent contact with 
his face, but without serious results. There have 
been numerous cases this fall of torn coats and 
scratched hands owing to the sharp-angled front sight 
of the new Krags, and those handling the guns should 
exercise care to avoid dangerous accidents. 

— The student Bible study is now well under way. 
Professor Holcomb has general charge of the work 
and supervises the instruction of the teachers. Classes 
have formed at hours most convenient to those attend- 
ing. The study will be conducted with special refer- 
ence to problems of college life. The teachers are 
Messrs. Franklin and Barnum of the faculty, Bart- 
lett '07, Wright '08, White '09, and Clarke '10. 
About eighty students are now enrolled. 

— The president plans to have quite a celebration 
on the fortieth anniversary of the founding of the 
college, October 2, 1907. While the details have 
not been worked out, there will probably be some kind 
of a gathering of noted agricultural educators at the 



go 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



9» 



college during that week and special exercises upon 
the particular day. The alumni features of the cele- 
bration will be held at the coming commencement, 
and will doubtless be marked by the presence of an 
unusually large number of graduates. These plans 
are under consideration with the local alumni. 

— The senior class in floriculture accompanied Mr. 
Canning in a very interesting and instructive trip to 
West Springfield a week ago Friday. On the way 
down a hasty visit was made to the Holyoke green- 
houses of Field and Sinclair. The next stop was 
made at the market gardening establishment of Mr. 
Smith in West Springfield. After spending a short 
time at this place the class went on to Mr. Carter's, 
where another large and apparently prosperous market 
garden is in operation. Both of these places had 
considerable lettuce growing under glass, as a winter 
crop. Before returning, the greenhouses of Mr. M. 
L. Brown were inspected. Mr. Brown has four 
small houses devoted to winter cucumbers, and was 
just beginning to harvest the first crop. 



SIGNAL COMPETITION. 

It becomes necessary to call the attention of the 
students of the three lower classes to the approach of 
a change in management of The Signal. Thus far 
very few have qualified for election to the board 
although the competition closes on the first Monday 
of March (this year the 4th.) If a sufficient num- 
ber do not qualify at that date it is necessary to go to 
the English department for recommendations and this 
arrangement is unsaMsfactory, for the instructors do 
not feel competent to say who would be likely to do 
the best work. As has been repeatedly stated in 
this paper, The Signal does not require much polished 
literary ability, but only a clear-cut, incisive style 
which makes "newsy" copy. For inis reason any 
kind of a write-up which clearly shows these talents 
will be welcomed as one of the three necessary 
pieces for eligibility. There must be men in college 
capable of doing this kind of work and it is up to them. 
So long as membership on The Signal board is 
studiously avoided by the vast majority of students, 
the editors cannot be blamed if the personal equation 
is large. Let us make the privilege of being on the 
editorial staff of the college paper as honored as a 
position upon the varsity football team. 



TWO PETITIONS. 

At a hearing before the committee of agriculture 
of the State Legislature on Tuesday, Jan. 22, a 
question was brought up relative to the proposed 
changing of the name "Hatch Experiment Station" 
to "Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station." 
No serious opposition was made to the change. A 
few facts are interesting in regard to the present 
name of the Station. The state of Massachu- 
setts established an experiment station at Amherst, 
before the general establishment of experiment 
stations in the various states by virtue of the Hatch 
Bill, known as the Massachusetts Experiment Station. 
Upon the passage of the Hatch Bill providing for an 
experiment station for each state, another experi- 
ment station was placed at Amherst in virtue of this 
bill known as the Hatch Experiment Station, in honor 
of Senator Hatch of Missouri, the originator of the 
bill. Thus there were two experiment stations for 
Massachusetts, both placed at Amherst. To 
economize time, labor and space the stations were 
united, under the name of Hatch Experiment Station. 
As other states provided themselves with experiment 
stations, they were generally called by the state name, 
and those who are urging the proposed change in the 
name of the Massachusetts experiment station propose 
to fall in line. There seems to be no especial reason 
why Massachusetts should honor Senator Hatch while 
even his own state refuses to do so. The fact is, 
every experiment station in the country is a monu- 
ment to Senator Hatch. The present name leads to 
various confusion, some people being inclined to con- 
sider our station as a fish hatchery, and others mixing 
it up in various ways with the poultry business. The 
reasons for the proposed change are well grounded. 
The exact results of the committee meeting are not 
as yet attainable. Professor Brooks as director of 
the Experiment Station was present at the hearing. 
A bill has been introduced into the State Legisla- 
ture "to require the Experiment Station at Amherst 
to state the dealer's cash price per ton for fertilizers 
and their value per ton of the ingredients of the same, 
and the percentage of difference between the said 
price and the said value." The people connected 
with the Experiment Station are opposed to certain 
features of the bill as it stands because they claim 
that prices vary with individuals, that is, some people 



will pay cash, while others will prefer to run up credit 
accounts, conditions which almost invariably effect 
prices. Some features of the bill, however, are 
worthy of approval. 



A NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

President Butterfield announced recently the action 
of the trustees in voting to establish a normal depart- 
ment of the college and a full professorship of agricul- 
tural education. The action is an outgrowth of the 
work of the Massachusetts board of industrial educa- 
tion, which a few years ago voted a sum of not more 
than $5000 for the college with which to establish a 
normal department. The sum was not available last 
year, but will be asked for in this year's budget. In 
view of this expected appropriation, it is hoped to 
establish such a department by the beginning of the 
next college year, in charge of a professor of agricult- 
ural education. 

The work of such a department would be broad in 
its scope, not only affecting the college directly, but 
also many secondary schools. At the college the 
work of the department would take the form of pre- 
paring and fitting young men and women for work In 
teaching agriculture and allied sciences, thus involv- 
ing a certain amount of pedagogy and normal work. 
While the Massachusetts agricultural college does at 
present furnish a certain number of teachers, espec- 
ially in agriculture, in both its elements and higher 
forms, yet these teachers are not pre-eminently fitted 
to teach in the strict sense which normal schools fit 
their graduates to teach. 

The other work of the normal department will con- 
sist in directing and co-operating with teachers in ele- 
mentary schools taking up the agricultural work, and 
to assist particularly in instituting high school work in 
elementary high schools as that at Petersham, the 
principal of which, Edwin H. Scott, is a graduate of 
the college in the class of 1906. This work in ele- 
mentary agriculture is rapidly coming to the front in 
preparatory schools, and Massachusetts men must 
take the lead in establishing it. At present only two 
state institutions are fitted with such departments, 
giving the opportunity for pioneer work at this college. 
Great care will be exercised in choosing a professor of 
agricultural education to take charge of this depart- 
ment, a rather difficult person to find. 



President Butterfield also announces the complete 
organization of a committee of the trustees on 
arrangement of grounds buildings. Two mem- 
bers of the faculty, Professors Brooks and Waugh, 
have also been placed upon the committee. The 
duties of the committee have reference to the growth 
of the college In years to come, and to a careful 
arrangement of grounds and and buildings from a 
convenient as well as a beautiful point of view. 
Landscape architects are to be hired for the purpose, 
a sum of $1000 being asked for in the next budget. 



FOURTH INFORMAL DANCE. 

One of the largest and most successful informals 
ever held took place in the Drill Hall on the afternoon 
and evening of the 12th. The large number present 
made the use of the entire hall necessary and the 
room therefore presented an unusual bareness owing 
to the absence of the flag as a feature of the decora 
tions. Massachusetts banners In abundance with 
potted plants relieved the crude appearance of the 
sidewalls. The stage for the orchestra was located 
on the east side of the floor and at intermission Mr. 
Rowe of Draper hall furnished refreshments. Sixty- 
one couples attended, most of the young women com- 
ing from Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges. Der- 
rick's Westfleld orchestra furnished the music, 18 
regular numbers being played, besides many encores 
and extras. The patronesses were Mrs. Orcutt of 
Smith, Miss Ferry of Mount Holyoke, and Mrs. 
Stone, Mrs. Martin and Mrs. Wellington of Amherst. 

COMMUNICATION. 

;The following is a contributed article. Thb Siomal will not be respon- 
sible for opinions or statements contained therein.— Ed. ] 

The Editor of the Signal : 

May I have a few lines of your space for a word 
upon a subject of interest to some of the alumni. We 
who have been out of college a few years are of 
course interested in the group photos of the athletic 
teams which appear in each Index. Often times we 
are unable to learn the names of those pictured before 
us because none are so inserted as to indicate "who s 
who" in the picture. It seems to me that the annual 
could be improved in this feature by the use of a 
method which would identify each player. Some of 
the older books are so arranged and I respectfully 
submit the idea for the consideration of the 1909 

Index board. 

Alumnus. 






ga 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



93 



THE LEGISLATIVE BUDGET. 

At a meeting of the committee of the trustees on 
finance, held in Boston on the I Oth, the appropria- 
tions to be asked for at the present session of the 
General Court were definitely fixed. The annual ap- 
propriation for instruction ($13,000) is to be in- 
creased because of certain additional needs to $20,- 

000. The following special appropriations are asked 
for: 

1. Equipment and buildings : 

(a) For equipping barn, stables and milk room. $3,000 

(b) For purchasing livestock for barn, 7.000 

(c) For equipping and furnishing Clark hall, 25,000 

(d) For boiler at power house, 2,000 

(e) For green-house, work-rooms and equipment. 22,000 



Total, $59,000 

2. For equipment, maintenance, repairs and minor 

improvements. $14,000 

Recapitulated, this amounts to annual appropria- 
tions $20,000, and special appropriations $73,000. 
The Signal will attempt, during the passage of the 
bill through the legislature, to cover its progress, to- 
gether with any features of interest which may de- 
velop in connection with it. 



Seminars. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 
The first meeting of the Stockbridge club after the 
Christmas holidays was held Thursday, Jan. 8. An 
interesting paper on "Plant Breeding" was read by 
Orton L. Clark, '08. The subject was handled in a 
general way as the hour would allow of no detailed 
account of this most interesting and important phase 
of horticultural progress. The speaker briefly sug- 
gested the methods of general use in plant breeding, 
namely, hybridizing, crossing, and selection. Illustra- 
tions of methods and results were given, the chief 
authority being Mr. Luther Burbank, that eminent 
horticulturist of the West and pioneer in plant breed- 
ing. It was pointed out that this specialized develop- 
ment of plants, flowers, fruits, and vegetables was of 
untold value to the nation and to civilization in gen- 
eral. The addition of a single kernel to every ear of 
corn, the production of a few more starch cells in 
every potato, or the increase in size of every grain of 
wheat, all will add millions to the nation's coffers In 



years to come. And may not these improvements 
assist slightly in placing that "law of diminishing 
returns" with which economists threaten us far in the 
dim future? 

At a short business meeting, the club voted to have 
the open dates filled by members, taking subjects in 
which they are specially interested. The faculty 
fathers of the club have been instrumental in securing 
a fine list of outside speakers and the schedule prom- 
ises to be extremely interesting. 

Tuesday, Jan. 15, Elmer D. Howe, '81, gave a 
very interesting talk before a crowded meeting of the 
club. His subject was " Some Reflections of a Mod- 
ern Hayseed " and the reflections, we think, were 
certainly up-to-date in every respect. Great stress 
was laid upon the importance of specialization in agri- 
cultural pursuits. The farmer who raised a few 
colts every year, ran a small dairy, sold a few eggs 
and chickens, and raised some apples, and with all 
these irons in the fire just managed to make a living, 
is a relic of the past. The farmer of today is the 
man who confines himself to one particular branch 
and devotes all his time and energy in putting on the 
market the very best articles. The price will con- 
form to the quality of the goods every time. Mr. 
Howe enlivened his remarks with many humorous 
anecdotes and kept everyone interested and awake 
throughout the lecture. 

The short-course men showed their appreciation 
of the work of the club by a large delegation from 
that class. As a passing remark the editor would 
say that the studious attitude of these men and evi- 
dent desire to get all possible benefits from their 
course is to be commended and, In this respect, their 
example might be copied with undoubted benefit by 
some of their more fortunate brethren who have the 
privilege of a four years course. 

HORTICULTURE SEMINAR. 
In a recent meeting of the senior horticulture sem- 
inar Professor Waugh gave a very interesting talk on 
"Country Life" (not the magazine), and showed how 
great the interest in rural living is today. With the 
millionaire class this living outside the city zone is 
still a fad, but with the average man who has a 
desire for wholesome living, — and dying, the appeal 
of the woods and meadows is irresistable. The 
great philanthropic enterprises support establishments 



in the country where the blind, the lame and the halt 
of the city slums have a breath of God's fresh air. 
The country offers opportunities for health and recrea- 
tion which are far ahead of any seashore resort. Lit- 
erature, especially the illustrated papers and maga- 
zines, have championed the cause of the country and 
the love for nature is growing on the people. The 
spell of city life has at last been broken, and the na- 
tion is realizing the delusion of the myriad lights, the 
painted palaces, and the ceaseless rumble and roar. 
Mr. Brown, a large orchard owner of Delaware, 
gave an informal talk, at Professor Waugh 's request, 
before the senior horticulture class recently. He 
dwelt principally upon the necessity of effective and 
thorough spraying, both as to the thoroughness of ap- 
plication and correct composition of the spraying mix- 
tures. He said that the use of the lime-sulphur mix- 
ture for San Jose scale was being given up, and that 
kerosene emulsion was taking its place. The latter 
has little, if any, fungicide effect, but is valuable as 
an insecticide. Mr. Brown is also an agent for the 
Niagara gas sprayer, which is being so successfully 
introduced in the orchard sections. 

ESPERANTO CLUB. 

The Rev. Mr. Johnson of Northampton addressed 
the meeting of the Esperanto club on Jan. 9. There 
was quite a large attendance to hear the speaker, 
necessitating the use of the chapel auditorium. Mr. 
Johnson showed a thorough knowledge of this new 
universal language, and the club has arranged for 
several more lectures by him in the near future. 

Wednesday, Jan. 16, the club convened in Room 
9 of the Chemical building for its weekly lesson. 
There are a few simple rules of grammar to be mas- 
tered at first, after which short stories are to be read 
in order to acquire a vocabulary. The members of 
the club take turns in holding the position of instruc- 
tor. 

Capt. Barton, United States navy, commandant of 
the corps of cadets at Cornell, is of the opinion the 
military drill will before long be abolished at the land 
armv grant colleges. It is proposed to substitute for driil 
a thorough course in military science. The general 
staff of the army is said to favor the change. This 
passing of drill, however desirable to the freshmen in 
the ranks, many will regret. 



Dfp&rtmtrvf fiot*s. 



DIVISION OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 
This division has recently received the latest edition 
of "Adolf Meyer's Lehrbush de Agricultur Chemie," 
published in three volumes. It is a most thorough 
treatise on the subject of chemistty as applied to 
agriculture. It is to be regretted that there is not an 
English edition of this valuable work. 

The experiment, covering a period of three months, 
to study the value of alfalfa meal as compared 
with wheat bran for milk production has been com- 
pleted, and while the results have not been worked 
out, it is evident that the claims made by the advo- 
cates of ground alfalfa hay as a substitute for wheat 
bran, can hardly be substantiated. 

Experiments are still in progress to study the phys- 
iological effect of cane molasses upon the digestibility 
of other food stuffs. 

The division is about starting an experiment to 
cover a period of four months to note the effect of 
soy bean protein and soy bean oil upon the relative 
proportion of the several milk ingredients, upon 
the composition of milk fat, and upon the con- 
sistency of the body or butter. Some 1500 pounds of 
soy beans have been shipped west to have the oil 
extracted. The entire experiment will require a great 
deal of accurate work on the part of all taking part 
in it. 

The inspection of Babcock machines has been 
completed, and a brief summary of the work accom- 
plished under the dairy law will soon be reported to 
creameries and milk depots in the state. 

A large amount of test work is being required this 
season by breeders of pure bred cattle. Five men 
have been kept busy during the last two months, and 
several applications for future tests are now on file. 
Applications are occasionally received from breeders 
outside of the state, but it is not possible to give 
them attention. 

W. K. Hepburn is about to begin an inspection of 
concentrated feeds on sale in Massachusetts. The 
entire state will be canvassed and several months will 
be required to complete the work. 

Determinations of dry matter and starch have 
recently been made in lots of potatoes for the agricul- 
tural division. 






( 



94 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



95 



The experimental creamery has recently been fitted 
with electric lights in anticipation of the work to be 
carried on during the winter months. 

T. M. Carpenter and J. F. Lyman, former employ- 
ees, recently visited the laboratory. Mr. Carpenter 
holds a responsible position with Dr. F. M. Benedict, 
in charge of human nutrition investigation under the 
Carnegie endowment funds. 

Bulletin 112 of the Hatch Experiment station has 
just been sent out together with Bulletin 1 14. Bul- 
letin 1 13 on fertilizers is still In the press. Bulletin 
112 has been prepared by Dr. Lindsey, and treits of 
"the Examination of Cattle and Poultry Food." 
It is a sixty paged pamphlet, and contains many 
valuable tables upon the subjects treated. A brief 
summary by paragraphs is as follows : Introduc- 
tion, Standards of Cattle and Poultry Foods, Chem- 
ical Examination of Cattle and Poultry Foods, Expla- 
nation and Discussion of the Results, Concentrated 
Information for Busy Farmers, Proprietary and Home- 
Mixed Grain Rations, Market prices of Cattle Foods 
for 1906, Weight vs. Measure of Cattle Foods. The 
back page of the bulletin contains a series of terse 
queries in regard to poor and unguaranteed foods. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

The eastern end of the upper hall at the entomolog- 
ical laboratory is being closed off by a glass partition 
and door, to form a room for the use of an assistant. 
C. E. Hood, '06, is temporarily acting as assistant 
in Entomology. 

A recent purchase for use in connection with fumi- 
gation experiments is a Hygrodeik, which gives the 
amount of relative humidity in the atmosphere. As 
the amount of humidity present in a greenhouse dur- 
ing fumigation may have an important bearing on the 
results, it is very desirable to be able to determine 
this accurately and quickly, and the Hygrodeik, a 
rather new apparatus, is claimed to be the most 
accurate of anything manufactured for this purpose. 

Extensive experiments on methods of control of the 
various kinds of root maggots, are being planned, in 
the expectation of conducting them on a large scale 
during the coming summer. H. J. Franklin has 
just received a large collection of bumble-bees from 
North Carolina, for study. Thirty-four short-course 
students are now taking Entomology. E. A. Back, 
'04, is instructor of the course. 



Bulletin 114 of the Hatch Experiment has been 
prepared by Dr. H. T. Fernald. It treats of "The 
Oriental Moth, A Recent Importation," including a 
map of the infested district, and a half-tone plate 
showing the moth in its various stages. A summary 
by paragraphs is as follows : Discovery of the Insect, 
Distribution, Food Plants, Abundance, Date of Infes- 
tation, Life History, Descriptions, The Oriental Moth 
in Asia, Will it become a Pest here, Acknowledge- 
ments. The bulletin covers fifteen pages. About 
nine or ten thousand of these are being sent out all 
over the country, in addition to whicn copies are being 
sent to members of the legislature in view of proposed 
plans for extermination of the pest. 

With the means supplied by the Adams' fund, the 
Entomological department of the Experiment station 
is going to carry on experiments in the cranberry dis- 
trict determining the relation of insects to cranberries. 
H. J. Franklin, '03, is to have charge of the work, 
under the general supervision of Dr. H. T. Fernald 
and Prof. C. H. Fernald, A conference in regard 
to this work was held in Boston on Saturday, Jan. 19. 
There the cranberry growers met in consultation 
Director Brooks, Mr. Franklin, and the Messrs. 
Fernald. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Professor Waugh is planning to take up again the 
work of the lantern slide exchange which proved so 
successful last year. The Professor has recently 
been using some of his spare time in preparing several 
new sets of slides. 

The course in forestry for the juniors has been 
arranged for the three weeks immediately preceeding 
commencement. It is undecided as yet whether 
the whole class will be required to take this course of 
lectures. Professor Rane, State Forester of Massa- 
chusetts, will be in charge. 



Al 



umm. 



NOTICE ALUMNI! 
The 1908 junior prom, will be held Feb. 15, 
1907. For particulars and invitations address 

J. Robert Parker, 
Amherst, Mass. 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts agricul- 
tural college club of Washington, D. C, will be 



held at the Shoreham in that city on the evening of 
Jan. 26. An informal dinner will be served in the 
palm room at as nearly seven o'clock as possible. 
The club is particularly fortunate this year in being 
assured of the presence of President Butterfield as its 
guest of honor. It is expected that Capt. W. M. 
Wright who was commandant at the college in '97 
and '98 will also be present. All alumni who can 
possibly attend should make an effort to do so if for 
no other reason than meeting the new head of the 
college. The arrangements fcr the meeting are in 
charge of the executive committee of the club ; F. 
D. Couden, 1310 Columbia Road, Washington, D. 
C, secretary. 

'78. — According to a recent number of Science, 
Pres. C. S. Howe of the Case School of Applied 
Science was elected a member of the "Sectional 
Committee" of section L (education) of the Amer- 
ican association for the Advancement of Science at 
the New York meeting. 

'81. —Elmer D. Howe spoke in a very interesting 
manner before the Stockbridge club, Jan. 15. His 
subject was "Impressions of a Modern Hayseed." 

'83. C. H. Preston has recently been elected 

master of the Danvers grange. 

♦90. — David Barry is the treasurer of a company 
organized in Amherst to furnish electricity to towns in 
this vicinity, the power being carried over a high- 
tension line from Turners Falls where it is generated. 
'92.— Dr. M. H. Williams has recently been elected 
master of the Sunderland grange. 

'94. The December number of the Experiment 

Station Record reviews five publications by C. P. 
Lounsbury of Cape Town, Cape Colony. These pub 
lications are entitled : Tobacco Wilt in South Africa, 
An Effective Treatment for Grape Anthracnose, 
Report of the Government Entomologist (for half year 
ending Dec. 31, 1904), Report of the Government 
Entomologist for 1905, Arsenate of Lead, and Habits 
and Peculiarities of some South African Ticks. 

'94.— R. E. Smith, Plant Pathologist at the Uni- 
versity of California Experiment Station, and Eliza- 
beth H. Smith, M. Sc, M. A. C, '05, are the 
authors of a paper in the 1 906 volume of the Botan- 
ical Gazette entitled "A New Fungus of Economic 
Importance." The fungus treated of is known as 
the brown rot of the lemon and is a serious trouble to 



I will be at No. f> South College, M. A. C, 
Wednesday, January 80th, to show latest stvles in 
Suits for the Spring and Summer seasons. Now is 
the time to thiuk about the new spring clothes. 



Geo. F.VesterJr. 

TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 

485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE, 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

AI.HO 

Dying£lcaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



All order* promptly attended to. 

Drop me a pontal ami I will call on you. 

ty-Full Dre»» Sulta to rent. ayStu.lenta' Clothe* bought. 

11 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 
best in the market. 



NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



9« 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



lemon growers and shippers in California. Both the 
genus and the species are described as new. 

'95. — The third annual report of Prof. R. A. 
Cooley, State Entomologist of Montana, is reviewed 
in the December number of the Experiment Station 
Record. This report includes forty nine pages of text 
and four plates of illustrations. 

'99.— B. H. Smith of the Bureau of Chemistry is 
the author of a paper in the last Yearbook of the 
Department of Agriculture entitled : "Formaldehyde, 
its Composition and Uses." This gives the results 
of analyses of commercial samples with notes on the 
general properties of formaldehyde as a disinfectant, 
deodorant, fungicide and preservative. 

'00. — F. Howard Brown of Marlboro his recently 
been made lecturer of the Marlboro grange. 

'04. — A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. John M. 
Gregg on Jan. 1 1 , at Arbor Lodge, Nebraska city, 
Nebraska. 

'04.— H. M. White of the Division of Pomology, 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture has recently left on an 
extended trip through Florida in the interest of the 
department. Later he will be sent on a trip to 
California. 

Ex- '04. — C. A. Tinker visited college recently and 
inspected the new buildings. Tinker is doing archi- 
tectural and engineering work in western Massachu- 
setts, with headquarters in Westfield. 

'06.— Herman A. Suhlke is now working for the 
Park, Davis Co., which deals in drugs. His address 
is 771 Lainard St., Detroit, Mich. 

'06.— Harry M. Russell, a graduate student at 
the college, has charge of the winter short-course in 
botany this year. 

COLLEGE CITY 
LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

263 Main Sthkkt, - • . NORTHAMPTON. 

Everything cooked to order. 



C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

KINK CAFK OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 
and Class Dinners. 

<;ko. H. BOWKKIl & CO. 

THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 

Most Attractive Cafe in Ne-# England. 

Private Dining RiMMM for Lailies and Theatre Parties. 

Class and Fraternity Banquet* a specialty. 

Try our Special Sunday Dinners, 5 p. M. to 8.30 p. m., 50c. 

When In town give us a trial and he convinced. 

Open until midnight. 

EDWARD A. LKWIS, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - - Holyokk, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICE8. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 

Rabar's Jim, 

Old South Street, off Main. NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Ontlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

SATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 6. 1907 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and A.umm are requested to contribute Communication* should be addressed. Collbos Signal. Amherst. Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested tc 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

CLINTON KING. 1907. Edrtor-ln-Chief. 

RALPH JEROME WATTS 1907. Business Manager. 

DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908, Assistant Editor. 

JOHN ROBERT PARKER. 1908. Assistant Business Manager 
ARTHUR WILLIAM HICGINS. 1907. Alumni Notes. EARLE COODMAN BARTLETT. 1907. 

JOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes. ROLAND HALE VERBECK, 1908. 

GEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR.. 1909. ALLAN DANA FARRAR. 1908. 

ORWELL BURLTON BRIGGS. 1909. 



Terma: $1.00 par near in adeance. Single Copiea. 10c. Postage outaide el I nlted States and Canada, vac. ertre 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Reading- Room Association. 
Basket-ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

C. H. White. Pres. Athletic Association. 

K. E. Glllett. Manager. Base- Ball Association. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. Nineteen Hundred and Eight Indei 

J.N. Summers. Sac. Fraternity Conference. 

E. D. PhUbrick. Manager. Musical Association 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry. Manager - 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second -class matter, Post Office at Amherst 
ti\r%«ti% \ »»\\»«»»t . (MUM 



Edi'tori&.s. 



The present issue of The Sicnal goes to press in 
the midst of the semester final examinations and this, 
together with illness upon the editorial staff, must 
account for any mistakes or deficiencies. 



The Signal is glad to publish in another column a 
letter from Professor Cooley which indicates that the 
alumni of the college have certainly not forgotten the 
just debt owing the memory of the late President 
Goodell. The editorial remarks In our last issue 
upon the subject were directed toward the trustees 
rather than the alumni and we are still forced to 
believe with the editor of the Amherst Record that the 
board Is somewhat recreant In this matter. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



We commend the two latest moves of President 
Butterfield, namely the establishment of a series of 
so-called "assemblies " and the restitution of Sunday 
chapel. The two meetings held thus far on Tuesday 



afternoon have been interesting breaks in the routine 
of winter drills and have appealed to one from an 
intellectual and aesthetic point of view. We look for- 
ward with considerable anticipation to the future gath- 
erings. It is quite unnecessary for The Sicnal to 
say anything more concerning Sunday chapel. We 
consider that one of the indications of barbarity left 
with us has now been removed and we hope that the 
students will fully support the movement. It is per- 
haps needless to say, however, that unless the Sunday 
services are conducted in an inspiring and enthusias- 
tic manner they will soon degenerate Into the farce 
which was wisely terminated in 1903. With inter- 
esting speakers a large attendance of both on and off 
campus students may be expected, although the hour 
is rather unseasonable for those living downtown. 



The season of prosperity which has favored the 
business world for so long begins to show signs of 
waning. Some obscure law seems to dictate that 
about every score of years a financial panic shall 
sweep over the country. Reasoning from the past 




9 8 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



99 



we may expect this marked periodicity of events to 
continue in the future. At first sight the question 
may not seem to involve M. A. C. students especially 
but upon a more deliberate consideration it will 
appear much more important. At this college where 
so many different lines of training are laid out it nec- 
essarily follows that some will be of a more practical 
nature than others. That is to say, some of the work 
is of the kind that must be done anyway be "the 
times" good or bad, the rest may be classed as luxu- 
ries which in days of prosperity are very remunerative 
but which offer little inducement when money is 
scarce. In the second class we might place for 
example landscape gardening and possible forestry 
work, especially on shade trees. Under conditions 
as they now exist it would seem wise, therefore, for 
those students who are considering their advanced 
courses, to choose the electives which are more likely 
to offer a sure position anyway than to trust to some 
of the fads and frills which have developed in the last 
few years and which, while they are important from 
an aesthetic standpoint, are likely to be temporarily 
relegated to comparative insignificance when a day of 
reckoning shall come in the financial and economic 
world. 



icism is after all a little misplaced and lies rather with 
the student than the instructor. Of late there has 
been a tendency of student committees to go before 
the faculty with suggestions as to the improvement of 
the curriculum and this seems a good move for before 
the student side of the question has often been 
entirely misunderstood. It would seem as if there 
lay an opportunity for good work by the senate along 
this line, although it has never been attempted by that 
body. Surely any feature which will lead to a better 
understanding and more co-operation between faculty 
and students should be given our closest attention. 



Athletic N<>*«- 



Nothing is more pitiable than to hear the com- 
plaints of an upperclassman who is dissatisfied with 
his electives. While the rash criticism of the course 
of study by the freshmen and sophomores is lament- 
able it can be excused by the fact that the whole 
schedule is compulsory and somewhat strenuous. 
Also the younger students hardly possess the foresight 
to always appreciate what is for their own best inter- 
ests. It is entirely different with the seniors and 
juniors. Tnese men are expected to investigate 
rather fully before taking up an elective subject. 
They should look into the resources of the department, 
its instructors and the practical value of it all. If 
after a somewhat random selection they find 
this particular course unsuited to their wants 
then their condition is unfortunate. But instead 
of advertising the fact all over college and else- 
where they should make the best of a bad situa- 
tion. It is a peculiar fact that graduates of the 
courses which are painted the blackest are achieving 
praiseworthy success in the world. Perhaps the crit- 



BASKETBALL. 

Cushinc, 24; Massachusetts, 14. 

On Jan. 23 the basketball team went down to 
defeat before Cushing at Ashburnham the score being 
24 to 14. The floor of the Cushing gymnasium which 
has defeated so many crack teams handicapped our 
players greatly and their shooting for baskets was 
incomparable with the work of their opponents. The 
game was roughly contested in spite of the small num- 
ber of fouls called. For M. A. C. Cobb played 
brilliantly, both Howard and Riordan having difficulty 
in keeping him covered properly. Loeber and How 
ard played well for Cushing. The home team made 
a shift at tha end of the first half moving one of their 
backfield to forward. At the end of the first half the 
score was 16 to 2 in favor of Cushing, during the 
second period our team playing somewhat better for 
the basket. 

The line-up :— 

CUSHING. MASSACHUSETTS. 

Edwards. Howard. I. f. '. g- Chase 

Forseman. r. f. 

Loeber. c. 

Howard. Riordan. 1. g. 

Kelley. r. g. 

Score— Cushing 24. Massachusetts 14. Goals from floor- 
Loeber 5. Riordan 2. Howard 3. Edwards. Forseman. Cobb 
4. Cutter. Chase, Burke. Free tries missed— Loeber 3. 
Kelley 2. Cobb. Fouls called— on Cushing 1. on M A. C. 3. 
Referee Wheelen. Timer — Theops. Time — 20-minute 

halves. 



1. g., Cutter 

c. Cilleu 

r. f.. Cobb 

1. f.. Burke 



Fitchburc Y. M. C. A., 25; Massachusetts, 22. 

On the evening following the Cushing game the 
team was defeated again but with a small score by the 
Fitchburg Young Men's Christian association, 25 to 
22. In team work, passing and all round playing our 
quintet excelled but they entirely failed to locate the 
netting at times when the winning of the game 
demanded it. Cobb was prominent as right forward 
and Gillett excelled In defensive playing. Forbes and 
Syme were the features for Fitchburg. In spite of 
the large number of fouls called the play was not of a 
"rough-house" nature and the best of feeling prevailed. 

The line-up : — 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. g , Chase 

1. g.. Cutter 

c. Gillett 

r. f.. Cobb 

1. f.. Burke 



FITCHBURG Y. M. C. A. 

Rich, Lee, 1. f. 
Davidson, r. f. 
Forbes, c. 
Syme. 1. g. 
McKenzie, Curley. r. g. 

Score— Fitchburg Y. M. C. A. 25, Massachusetts 22 
Goals from floor— Forbes 3. Rich 2. Syme 2. Davidson 2. 
Gillett 3. Cobb 3. Burke, Chase. Cutter. Goals from fouls— 
Fitchburg 7. Referee — J. W. Waters. Time -20-minute 
halves. 

Massachusetts, 24; Connecticut, 16. 

After a period of considerable suspense Massachu- 
setts pulled itself out of a bad hole In a home basket- 
ball game with Connecticut agricultural college on the 
evening of Jan. 26th and won 24 to 16. Burke, left 
forward, was absent from sickness and the team suf 
fered thereby both in passing and shooting. The first 
half was slow and uninteresting with Connecticut 
always in the lead. At its close the score stood 10 to 
9 in favor of the visitors. In the second period our 
team took a big brace and Chase by clever work 
caged four baskets in rapid succession for Massachu 
setts. Cobb played consistently in passing and team 
work. Vance excelled for Connecticut shooting three 
difficult baskets. The visiting team was able from 
its practice in a small hall where shots are commonly 
made its entire length to surprise our players consid- 
erably in this feature. When directly under the 
basket however they did not figure much. Between 
the halves and before the game the band rendered 
several musical selections. 

The line-up : — 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Neal. Woodward. 1. f. 
Cobb. r. f. 
Gillett. c. 
Cutter. I. g. 
Chase, r. g. 



CONNECTICUT. 

r. g.. Boutfeld 

1. g., Miller 

c. Congelman 

r. f.. Watrous 

I. f.. Vance 



Score — Massachusetts, 24 ; Connecticut, 16. Goals from 
floor — Chase 6, Vance 4. Cobb 3. Congelman 2, Gillett. Cut- 
ter, Boutfeld. Watrous. Goals from foul — Cobb. Referee — 
F. C. Peters of Massachusetts. Time— 20-minute halves. 
Attendance — 200. 

Woodward, '10, who appeared in the Connecticut 
game for the first time as a 'varsity sub. has the 
appearance of being a likely man for the team. 
While he displayed a shyness for basket shooting and 
missed several excellent opportunities his passing and 
blocking were excellent and with a little more con- 
fidence he should make good. 

Elsewhere in this issue is printed the report of the 
football manager for the season of 1906. The credit- 
able balance on the right side of the ledger is com 
mendable and The Signal congratulates Mr. Clark 
upon the successful season which he has managed. 
With Professor Howard we express the hope that 
future athletic managers may be chosen with the same 
foresight as have the two representatives from the 
class of '07, F. A. Cutter and M. H. Clark. 



THE TRACK PROPOSITION. 

Several, we might almost say many, years ago the 
Massachusetts agricultural college was represented 
by a track team. For some reason, probably the lack 
of an athletic field, interest died out and the whole 
affair lapsed into a comatose condition. When the 
present junior class were freshmen the subject again 
came to the front, several members agitating a revival 
of the track proposition. A jumping pit was actually 
laid out and, through the medium of a good press 
agent, the question was thoroughly aired in The Signal. 
The lateness of the season, however, postponed much 
actual work until the following spring. During the 
winter he who h?d been the heart and soul of the 
movement was forced by ill health to leave college 
and there being no one to take his place nothing more 
was done. As time passes and we note the increase 
of prep, school athletes among the students the need 
of a track team becomes more and more apparent. 
From the attitude of the faculty and trustees we feel 



100 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



101 



safe in urging a renewed effort along this line upon the 
part of the undergraduates. But some one must take 
the initiative. In the absence of anyone else, this 
seems to rest with the athletic association. A mass 
meeting of the students should be called and an 
attempt made to collect by subscription or taxation 
enough money to lay out a provisional track. If the 
athletic association feels incompetent for the task it is 
then up to some of the influential members of the 
senior and junior classes. The Signal promises all 
of the moral aid which it is able to give in sup- 
port of the plan. Is there no one among the students 
with the enthusiasm and personal magnetism which 
shall '-start the ball rolling?" 




— W. E. Cary, '10, has been forced by illness in 
his family to leave college. 

— Prof. C. H. Fernald was detained from his 

college duties for over a week owing to a severe cold. 

— The preliminary dance orders for the 1908 junior 

promenade were filled out last Friday immediately 

after dinner. 

— At a recent meeting of the Musical association 
G. H. Chapman was elected manager in place of E. 
G. Bartlett, resigned. 

— The class of 1907 has appointed its class officers 
as a committee to make nominations for commence- 
ment and Prom, committees. 

— On Jan. 24th the official college thermometer 
reached 23 1-2 degrees below zero, the coldest 
weather recorded since January. 1904. 

— On Jan. 28th President Butterfield gave a talk at 
Cushman as a part of a lecture course at that place 
on "A program for rural betterment." 

— A large number of M.A. C. students attended the 
lecture on the "Panama Canal" delivered in college 
hall by Dr. W. F. Johnson of the New York Tribune. 
— Alumni or any others coming across newspaper 
notices which have any reference to the college or Its 
work are asked to send them to the college, to be used 
in its memorabilia. 

J. 0. Chapman. '07, had the misfortune to fall 

recently in South college and fracture the bone of his 



right elbow. Owing to the bad location of th-i break 
it will be many weeks before he recovers the use of 
his arm. 

— On Feb. I the masters of about 20 subordinate 
granges of this locality were guests of the college in 
connection with a grange conference with the Amherst 
grange that evening. Frofessor Waugh is master of 
the Amherst grange. 

—Circular No. 72 of the Office of Experiment 
Stations of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
published Jan. 15, 1907, contains a report of the 
committee on extension work which was presented to 
the Association of American Agricultural colleges and 
experiment stations at the convention held at Baton 
Rouge, La., Nov. 14 16, 1906. President Butter- 
field is chairman of this committee and the work 
which the circular represents was largely done by him 
and put into shape her^ at M. A. C. 

On Feb. 10 will be instituted the first of a series 

of Sunday morning chapel services to be continued 
on trial for two or three months. The services will 
be held at 9-30 a. m. so as to in no way interfere with 
the plans of those who may wish to attend services in 
town. The service at that date will be conducted by 
David Sprague of Amherst. This movement in 
favor of Sunday chapel has been taken upon request 
of many of the students, especially those associated 
with the Young Men's Christian association. 

Dr. Stone attended Mr. Rawson's recent ban- 
quet at the Hotel Vendome. Boston. A large num- 
ber of Boston business men and market gardeners 
were present, including the governor, lieutenant gov- 
ernor and council. In his address Governor Guild 
dwelt at considerable length on the agricultural col- 
lege. Among other things, he said that it was the 
best agricultural college in the country, and that its 
library stood among the best agricultural iibraries of 
the world. He referred to Massachusetts as an 
important agricultural state and stated that the intelli- 
gence and methods of the farmers of the common- 
wealth were unexcelled. 



MASSACHUSETTS ALUMNI CLUB BANQUET. 

The annual reunion and dinner of the M. A. C. 
Alumni Club of Massachusetts was held at Young's 
hotel. Boston. Friday evening, Feb. 1 ; for an hour 



before the banquet an informal reception was held in 
the hotel parlors, and at seven o'clock about one hun- 
dred members of the club and several guests sat 
aown to an excellent dinner. 

A. H. Kirkland president of the club acted as 
toastmaster, and opened the second part of the pro- 
gram with a few words regarding the advantages of a 
small college ; he then presented Senator Charles N. 
Prouty of Spencer who spoke of the importance of 
agriculture in Massachusetts, the necessity of the 
state co-operating with the agricultural movements 
and supporting them by liberal apprproiations of 
money ; he emphasized the idea that a greater devel- 
ient of the moral and social life in agricultural 
sections is becoming a problem which must be solved 
by agricultural leaders aided by those of other classes. 

Hon. J. L. Ellsworth, secretary of the Massachu- 
board of agiicjlt.jrc spoke of the past and pres- 
ent relations of tfnt organization to the state agricul- 
tural college, and dwelt upon trie magnificent possi- 
bilities, due to tne varied types of soil found in differ- 
ent sections of the state, for carrying on agriculture 
l) Massachusetts. Mr. Ellsworth was followed by 
i. George H. Martin, secretary of the state board 
of education, who talked at length of the effect on our 
rural society, of well-educated, cultured farmers; this 
type of people can bring to agricultural communities 
ame refinement enjoyed by other classes and 
raise the standard of rural living to a level with that 
attained by professional or business men. 

Senator E. A. Stevens, chairman of the ways and 
means committee of the legislature, referred to the 
superior advantages which young men and women 
have today, compared with those of the past genera- 
ton , to secure a grammar school and high school 
education ; he loyally defended the present legi 
'ure. denying the truth of statements made against 
oy certain newspapers, and upheld it as a body of 
:onscientious, self sacrificing men who are giving their 
oest efforts to make the best lavs for their state ; 
admitting that conditions are far from idea!, and that 
some few men are out of place in the legislature, he 
^ated thai the legislature of Massachusetts is the 
cleanest of any state in the Union, and he presented j 
evidence that Bay State leads all others in perfecting ; 
methods and principles of legislation. 

C. O. Bailey of Newbury spoke briefly on the man- 



hood of New England farmers, looking to New Eng- 
land and to the agricultural class in particular to pro- 
duce the greatest leaders and statesmen of the coun- 
try. For the trustees, Hon. W. H. Bowker spoke of 
the object and necessity of carrying on extension work 
in connection with the college, appealed to the legis 
lature for financial aid in this movement, and sub 
mitted resolutions, which were adopted by the club, 
supporting President Butterfield in his work and plans 
for agricultural extension work in Massachusetts. 

President Butterfield briefly reviewed the progress 
of M.A. C. made during the last six months, refer 
ring especially to the office of Dean of the college and 
the professorship of humanities created by the board 
of trustees and both of which will be tilled at the 
beginning of the next college year by Prof. G. F. 
Mills. He outlined the broader work which is ab-.ut 
to be taken up by the horticultural department, stating 
that he is nearly prepared to submit to the trustees the 
name of a man to act as assistant professor of flori 
culture ; he gave a brief plan of the work to be done by 
a normal department at M. A. C. mentioned the 
favorable spirit of the students toward the college, the 
need of an athletic field, and the coming year of 
anniversaries. Soon Dr.Goessmann will have reached 
his eightieth birthday and it seems fitting that on that 
occasion, the college should do something to honor 
this good old man who has devoted so many years of 
his life to M. A. C. and the experiment station work. 
This is also, tne twenty-fifth anniversary of the found 
ing of the experiment station, and in June will end 
forty years of the college's existence. The present plan 
although not worked out in detail is to have in June 
at Commencement time, a celebration of these events 
for the alumni especially, and in tne following October 
to devote a few days to the interest of the farmers 
and farmers' organizations of the state. 

Other speakers of the evening were Prof. S. F. 
Howard of the M. A. C. athletic association, Repre 
sentative Hoiman, '83, of North Attleboro, Hon. C. 
H. Shaylor chairman of the agricultural committee 
and Hon. M. F. Dickinson. A noticeable feature of 
the gathering was the fact that very few of the younger 
aiumni were present : all of the classes graduating 
during the past six years were represented by less 
than a dozen men ; what is the cause for this? Is 
interest lagging or has it never existed ? Four mem- 



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bers of the state legislature were present and each one 
expressed his hearty sympathy with and interest in the 
work of agriculture in Massachusetts and each pledged 
to do all in his power to aid the passage of the appro- 
priation bill which at present is before their body. 
With such a man as President Butterfield at our head 
with the interest of the legislature, the backing of the 
trustees and alumni, together with the support and 
cooperation of the student body, the outlook for the 
future of the Massachusetts agricultural college is 
most encouraging, and bids fair to give her a power- 
ful influence in the agricultural world. 



The following week the cadet band gave a concert 
before an audience composed of the student-body and 
several townspeople. The entertainment, consisting 
of six selections, was excellent, and the progress 
which the band has made during the past four months 
under the leadership of Mr. Short of Springfield was 
a revelation to almost everyone. The organization is 
far more proficient than ever before, and as Capt. 
Martin intends to retain the instructor until the mid- 
dle of April, music should be one of trre features of 
the college and the battalion during the coming spring 
months. 



A NEW FEATURE. 

President Butterfield has announced that the regu- 
lar Tuesday afternoon drills until Easter will be 
omitted, and in their place will be given a series of 
lectures by both members of the faculty and outside 
lecturers. Prominent men will be secured for this 
exercise, which will be made a feature in college 
work. 

President Butterfield himself delivered the first of 
these lectures, speaking of his trip South in connec- 
tion with the meeting of agricultural educators at 
Baton Rouge. He opened his talk with humorous 
remarks about southern train service and the difficulty 
which many members of the society for the promotion 
of agriculture experienced in reaching the destination. 
He then spoke of the men who comprise the society, 
their scientific and businesslike attitude, and the work 
which they are doing now, and must be prepared to 
do in the future. He described the high grade ex- 
periment station work which is coming to the front, 
and of the demand for capable men to carry it out. 

The importance of extension work in agriculture 
as emphasized at Baton Rouge was clearly brought 
out. The work of the agricultural college of today is 
threefold — research work, student instruction in the 
college courses, and extension teaching. The appli- 
cation of these principles in Massachusetts was clearly 
shown and some plans rehearsed for the near future 
in regard to extension work. The president then 
broadened out upon his subject, taking up economic 
and racial conditions of the South, treating them in a 
broad way which impressed the students with new 
ideas concerning the great South. Considerable in- 
terest was developed concerntng the negro question. 



A PRESS BUREAU. 

The following article taken from the Williams Record 
for Jan. 21, 1907, explains quite fully a plan which 
the authorities, with the assistance of the paper and a 
few Interested students, have adopted to afford great- 
est publicity to news concerning the Berkshire college. 
The Signal is induced to give considerable space to 
the subject because it exemplifies the means by which 
the remarkable Ignorance of most people concerning 
M. A. C. can alone be dissipated. The present ad- 
ministration here has had some such idea in view, 
and it seems that the newspapers of New England, at 
least, might be supplied with news of our college 
every week or so in this manner at a minimum ex- 
pense. It appears as if the object well merited a 
small appropriation from the trustees as an exper; 
ment : 

" On Wednesday, Jan. 16, the first news bulletin 
of the Williams college press bureau was sent out to 
about seventy-five newspapers in the leading cities of 
the United States, from St. Paul and Boston to 
Washington and Buffalo. The work of this bureau 
will correspond in a small way for Williams news, to 
the work of the Associated Press for the news of the 
country, with the only difference that this news will 
be sent out to the different newspapers absolutely 
free of charge. A similar plan has worked with much 
success at Amherst and Brown, which suffered from 
the same inattention of newspapers to college affairs 
Williams is now experiencing. " 

" News items will be sent out by the bureau twice 
a week in condensed form, about 400 words in length. 
to the various papers. The items may be sent out 
three times a week in the spring if results warrant. 



The greatest emphasis will be laid on the administra- 
tion and general ne*s of the college. The minor 
athletic news will be sent out separated from the other 
news for the convenience of the sporting editors. 
No attempt will be made to cover the more important 
athletic events, as all papers would prefer for these 
such telegraphic reports as the Associated Press 
would send out. No news will be sent to papers that 
receive an adequate amount of Wiliiams news from 
local correspondents." 

" An absolute record will be kept of the amount of 
new* printed by each paper and papers which 
will not use the news will oe cut after due 
trial and new papers added. The list, which 
ij thus seen to be elastic, has been so made out as 
to include in each city, wherever thought practical, a 
republican and democratic, a morning and evening 
paper, that all possible readers may be reached." 

OUR TROPHY ROOM. 

I was interested in the editorial in The Signal 
about the need of a trophy room. The matter 
occurred to me a number of times during the past 
year and I wondered why the student-body did not 
take up the matter. 

As the editor said we have no trophy room. But 
have we made any effort to secure one ? It seems to 
me that we ought to be collecting trophies to fill that 
room when we get it. To be sure we have quite a 
few already but we should not be content with these. 
Why wait until a trophy room is in sight before trying 
to get pictures of the athletic teams? And will it not 
be too late then to secure the ball brought back from 
some well-earned football victory? Now such balls 
are used in the daily practice or are given to the 
student body to kick about the campus. This is all 
very well, but it doesn't add to the collection that we 
will want for our trophy room by and by. 

No doubt a place can be found for the safe keep- 
ing of these trophies even if they cannot be displayed 
to advantage at present. "What is everybody's 
business is nobody's business," and if our collection 
lor a trophy room is to grow each year someone 
must be chosen for the responsibility. These mat- 
ters concern the student body. If no great amount 
of interest is shown it is not probable that our trophy 
room will be an immediate reality. But I feel sure 



that if the matter is properly taken up and worked for 
we can have a trophy room of which every 
••Massachusetts" man will be proud. 

B. '04. 
[Editorial note : — We are glad to publish the fore- 
going article written by an alumnus who, while he 
never made his letter, has done more to foster ath 
letlcs at this college than most of the athletes them 
selves. We sincerely hope that his suggestion will 
be adapted in place of the somewhat short sighted 
policy of the present — B1.] 



THE GOODELL PORTRAIT. 

An editorial comment in The Signal for Jan. 23 
suggests that there is an apparent apathy in the mat 
ter of a memorial to the late President Goodell. 
That what has been done is not generally known was 
brought to notice a few days since by the acknowl- 
edged ignorance in the matter of one in closest touch 
witn the college interests. There has been no effort 
to keep the matter secret, so far as I know ; nor does 
there appear to be any good reason for not letting the 
friends of the college know how matters stand. 

In 1905 the associate alumni of M. A. C. 
appointed a committee to consider the matter of a 
portrait of President Goodell. Dr. Frederick Tuck 
erman served on this committee with the executive 
committee of the alumni. A very serious difficulty 
was encountered in the necessity of painting the like- 
ness from photographs instead of from the original. 
It was further important to engage an artist whose 
work should please Mrs. Goodell and other members 
of the family. The choice could not, therefore, be 
hastened and at the annual alumni meeting last June 
only a report of progress could be made. The matter 
was therefore recommitted. Various artists have 
! been under consideration, their work examined by 
; memoirs of the committee and the family of the late 
| president. While the order has not yet been given I 
think that choice is practically made, of an artist who 
has not only turned out some very creditable work but 
who has, apparently a distinct advantage over com- 
petitors in having known President Goodell personally 
during several years of residence in Amherst. 

It is confidently expected that the order for tne 
Goodell portrait will be shortly given, and that it will 
be completed and accepted before commencement. 






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We may look forward therefore to the unveiling of the 
portrait of our late president as one of the very inter- 
esting features of next commencement. The funds 
for this gift to the college are to be provided 
by the associate alumni. No general appeal is 
to be made for contributions. Any alumnus who 
wishes to contribute has merely to send his member- 
ship fee of one dollar and annual dues to the secretary 
of the associate alumni to be a participant in this trib- 
ute to the memory of the much beloved President 

Goodell. 

F. S. Cooley, Sec. 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI MEET. 

The annual meeting and banquet of the Washing- 
ton M. A. C. alumni club was held at the hotel 
Shoreham in that city on Jan. 26th. About fifteen 
of the younger graduates of the college, most of 
whom are employed in different departments of the 
national government were present. The time was 
passed in anecdotes and reminiscences of student 
days. President Butterfield greeted the club as the 
representative of the faculty and spoke upon pertinent 
matters concerning the college. 



FOOTBALL MANAGER'S REPORT, 
SEASON OF 1906. 

RECEIPTS. 

Guarantees : 

Holy Cross, $ 65.00 

Williams. 75.00 

Brown. 175.00 

Harvard, 145.00 

Dartmouth, 265.00 

Tufts, 125.00 

Amherst, 259.25 

Springfield T. S., 75.20 

Gate Receipts, New Hampshire game, 13.00 

Faculty, 60.00 

Taxes from students, 544.50 



Total, $1801.95 

EXPENDITURES. 

Baseball deficit, ($9.00) and medical 

attendance 1905, ($68.00)— $77.00 

Coach O'Hearn's board, 30.25 

Equipment, 351.93 



Holy Cross, 

Williams, 

New Hampshire, 

Brown-Harvard trip, 

Dartmouth, 

Amherst, 

Tufts, 

Springfield, 



88.73 

78.52 
151.99 
344.96 
159.22 

16.50 
147.53 

70.35 



Telephone, Telegraph, Stamps, Stationery, 

Sundries, 54.12 

Coach Murphy, 75.00 

Medical attendance season of 1906, 68.20 



Total, 
Recapitulation, 
Receipts, 
Expenditures, 



$1714.30 

$1801.95 
1714.30 



$87.65 



Balance on hand, Jan. 1, 1607, 
Respectfully submitted, 

M. H. Clark, Manager. 
C. P. Hallican, Auditor 



Seminars. 



With the approach of the mid-year examinations 
and the general postponement of the meetings of the 
clubs and seminars, the editor finds news for this col- 
umn sadly lacking at present. 

STOCKBR1DGE CLUB. 
The club held no meeting on its regular date, Jan. 
22, but plans had been made for an exceedingly 
Interesting lecture to be given by Mr. George D. 
Leavens, of the class of '98, on the following Tues- 
day, Jan. 29. At the last moment Mr. Leavens 
was forced to cancel the engagement on account of 
illness. 

CHEMICAL CLUB. 

The Chemical club held its regular meeting Wed- 
nesday, Jan. 23, in room 8 of the Chemical building. 
An interesting and instructive paper was read by 
George Chapman, '07. His subject was "Sir Will- 
iam Perkins' Work on Coal Tar Colors." The sur- 
prising usefulness and value of this seemingly insig- 
nificant by-product of coal was clearly demonstrated. 
It was shown that nearly all the colors of the rainbow 
could be obtained from this dark, vile-smelling 
substance. 



ESPERANTO CLUB. 
Wednesday, Jan. 23, the Esperanto club met as 
usual for its regular lesson. The hour was taken up 
in the discussion of the grammatical termination to 
prefixes. An increasing interest seems to be 
evinced by members of the student body in this new 
language, and the club is steadily growing. The 
college club has recently joined the American esper- 
anto association and is now receiving and keeping on 
file all the current literature of the society. Wed- 
nesday. Jan. 30. the meeting of the club was post- 
poned on account of the mid-year examination:,. 

Y. M. C. A. 
Mr. Evans of Northampton lead the meeting of the 
Y. M. C. A. on Thursday, Jan. 24. His subject 
was "Checkers," which strikes one as being a rather 
odd topic from which to draw a religious lesson. Mr. 
Evans is a pleasing speaker and his subject was skil- 
fully handled in a way that could not but appeal to the 
manhood and character of college men. 

HORTICULTURE. 

The senior class recently enjoyed an instructive 
lecture on "Fruit Packages" by Professor Waugh. 
Models of the different baskets and boxes were shown 
and their relative merits discussed. Much import- 
ance was laid upon the marketing of fruits in attrac- 
tive packages. 

A talk on "Ferns and Orchids" was given by K. 
E. Gillett, '08, before the junior class in Arboriculture 
at a recent exercise. Mr. Gillett 's experience with 
these plants and flowers had evidently been put to 
good use for a thorough knowledge of their character- 
istics and habits was shown. The value of ferns for 
planting purposes is not sufficiently appreciated today, 
and as an adjunct to any natural scenery they are 
indispensable. Mention was made of the different 
varieties of Cypripedium, of their extreme beautv 
and distinctive colorings. The other members of the 
class speak at various times on horticultural subjects. 



D{p&r"tm?iYf ^lot?s. 

HORTICULTURE. 
Carl S. Pomeroy of Vermont has been appointed 
assistant horticulturist of the Massachusetts agricul- 
tural college. He will be assigned to the gen- 



eral charge of all the experimental work in the depart- 
ment of horticulture. Mr. Pomeroy was born in 
Franklin county, Vermont in 1882. He graduated 
from the Enosburg Falls high school in 1900, and 
that autumn entered the university of Vermont. He 
graduated from the Latin scientific course of that 
institution with the degree of Ph. B. in 1904. He 
immediately entered the agricultural course in the 
same institution and after two yeari of advanced 
work received the degree of B. S. in 1906. Mean- 
while he had been employed in experimental work in 
the department of horticulture of the Vermont experi- 
ment station, and on graduation was appointed assist 
ant horticulturist, which position he resigns to take up 
work at Massachusetts. 

The horticultural department has recently received 
from tne Massachusetts horticultural society two 
medals for displays of fruit made last fall. The 
horticultural society issues its awards the first of 
every year, and the Massachusetts agricultural col- 
lege awards have but recently arrived. Both medals 
are about I 1-2 Indies in diameter, with handsome 
designed figures in bas relief on one side, and an 
inscription on the other. One of the medals is of 
silver-gilt, awarded for excellence of display of fruit. 
The other medal is still more handsome, of bronze, 
inscribed as award for excellence of display of dwarf 
fruits. 

The senior class in landscape gardening is now 
taking a new course of lectures not before given at 
Massachusetts agricultural college or elsewhere. 
These are from the chapters of a book recently 
written by Prof. F. A. Waugh, dealing with the 
study and appreciation of landscape. Special atten- 
tion is paid to the elements and character of natural 
landscape. The whole treats of the subject chiefly 
from the point of view of the professional landscape 
gardener. The landscape gardening work-rooms 
have been enriched lately by the addition of several 
valuable books. The latest accession is Sturgis's 
"Dictionary of Architecture and Building" in three 
volumes. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

The first report on cranberry investigations, made 
by Mr. H. J. Franklin last summer at Wareham, is 
now ready for the printer. Mr. A. H. Armstrong is 
working up a collection of scale insects from Barba- 









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107 



dos, which contains many interesting forms. The 
seniors taking entomology have completed the lectures 
on insect structure, and the subject of insecticides is 
now being given. 

The large amount of cloudy weather thus far this 
winter has seriously interfered J/ith the success of 
fumigation experiments for cucumbers, as the plants 
have hardly made any growth ; but though only about 
six inches high, they are covered with blossoms and 
smallfruit, well illustrating the lack of sunlight, 
although under such conditions the fumigation expari 
ments could hardly be expected to give normal results. 

Dr. E. P. Felt, the New York state entomologist, 
writes to the department that cocoons of the Oriental 
moth have been found on Japanese plants in a green- 
house at Albany, N. Y., but that the insect did not, 
in ali probability, succeed in establishing itself there. 



Alu 



mm. 



The sixth annual meeting and banquet of the Con- 
necticut Valley association of the Massachusetts 
agricultural college alumni will be held in the Cooley 
hotel at Springfield, on Thursday evening, Feb. 21 at 
6 o'clock. President Butterfieid and other members 
of the faculty will be present. The banquet fee is 
$2.50 which should be sent to tha secretary before 
the 18th. Arrangements have already been made to 
hold the last train out of Springfield for Northampton 
until after the banquet and a special car will convey 
theAmherst people home from Northampton. These 
arrangements bring the banquet within the reach of 
ail alumni in the vicinity of the college and a large 
delegation from Amherst is expected. 

H. D. Hemenway, Secretary, 

Northampton, Mass. 

It is felt that the library is very deficient in works 
of standard authors. If any alumnus has any volumes 
of periodicals or books of merit which he is willit g to 
present to the library, they will be very gladly received. 

'82.— Herbert Myrick is the president of the 
Phelps publishing company whicn suffered from a dis- 
astrous half- million dollar fire in Springfield last week. 

'83.— The V. P. I. Agricultural Journal of the 
College of Agriculture, Blacksburg, Va., contains a 
very interesting article on the work of D. O. Nourse, 



who, since 1888 has been professor of agriculture at 
that institution, but who has recently severed his con 
nection with the college. The paper speaks in the 
highest possible terms of his work in the agricultural 
department, and in the building up of the college. 
"When it became known that he intended to sever 
his connection with the institute, there was universally 
expressed regret on the part of the faculty and stu- 
dents. In him the faculty lost one of its senior 
members, an earnest, consistent and intelligent col- 
league and co-worker, a neighbor and friend ; the 
students lost an excellent teacher and adviser, ant 
one who had ever been to them an eximple of a 
noble Christian gentleman. As a slight token of the 
high esteem and respect in which he was heid, the 
students in agriculture presented to him at the ciose 
of the session a magnificent silver dish. Professor 
Nourse is now at his old home in Massachusetts 
leading the life of a happy farmer." 

'83.— Director H. J. Wneeler of Rhode Island 
spoke at the New England Grain Dealers' association 
in Boston, Jan. 25. 

•92. — H. E. Crane is now a member of the 
chamber of commerce in Washington, D. C. Mr. 
Crane is doing an extensive grain business in Quincy, 
and is a member of the city council. 

'92. — James E. Deuel has been elected a d. rector 
of the Easlhampton Electric Light company. 

'94. — Born in Springfield, Jan. 24, a daughter, 
Dorothy Rice, to Mabel A. and Theodore S. Bacon. 
'94. — Superintendant A. H. Kirkland of the Gypsy 
moth work has sent to the Legislature his annual 
report. It shows the alarming extent of the depre- 
dations of the gypsy and brown tail moths, for 140 
cities and towns in the eastern part of the state are 
infested by the gypsy moth and a much larger area by 
the brown tail. The gypsy district covers 2500 square 
miles, including over 75$ of the taxable property of 
the state. The work has been quite successful dur- 
ing the year, for about 1200 men have been employed 
by the state and about $315,000 has bsen spent by 
the municipalities and the state, and about as much 
by private owners. Next year's work is expected to 
be more efficient, and an appropriation of $225,003 
is recommended. 

'97.— H. A. Ballou was at Jamaica, B. W. I., at 



the time of the earthquake which destroyed Kingston 
but escaped without injury or serious inconvenience, j 

'97.— John Marshall Barry is a director and gen- 
eral manager ot the Boston Auto school, a school 
which teaches the operation, construction, and repair- 
ing of automobiles located at 343 Tremont St., 
Boston. 

'97.— James L. Bartlett is in charge of the U. S. 
weather bureau at the university of Wisconsin. Mr. 
Bartlett lectures on meteorology in the university. 
Address, Madison, Wis. 

'97. Herbert J. Armstrong is in the employ of 
the Atchinson, Topeka & Santa Fc railway, address 
care Chief Engineer. 1033 Railway Exchange, 
Chicago. 

'97. L. L. Cheney, V. M. D., meat and milk 
inspector. Health Department, City of Augusta, Ga. 

'97.— L. F. Clarke. 1437 Seventh St., Des 
Moines, la. 

'99.— B. H. Smith is head chemist at the U. S. 
appraisers' building in Boston. 

'02. — C. I. Lewis, horticulturist of the Oregon 
experiment station, has just published a very com- 
plete and attractive bulletin on "The Walnut in 
Oregon." This refers of course to the so-callled 
"English" walnut. 

'03. — One of the houses on the hospital grounds in 
Northampton is being renovated for the residence of 
J. G. Cook. 

'03. — W. E. Tottingham has charge of a short 
course class of 600 at the university of Wisconsin. 

'04. — P. F. Staples has resigned his position as 
horticulturist of the Baron de Hirsch schools and will 
return to Massachusetts on Feb. 15 to engage in 
fruit growing and truck farming for himself in West- 
boro. His new work will be shared with his classmate 
A. L. Peck. 

'05. — H. L. Barnes is at Interlaken, West Stock- 
bridge, having closed his engagement at the Rhode 
Island experiment station. 

'05. — The "Hampton Leaflets" are bulletins on 
agricultural subjects issued by the Hampton institute 
of Virginia. The most recent number entitled 
"Some Injurious Insects" bears the name of F. A. 
Bartlett as author. 

'05.— W. B. Hatch, 83 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 



Geo. F.Vester.Jr 



TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 



485 Main Street, • SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE, 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



All order* promptly attended to 
Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 
-r till Dress Suits to rent. «y3tudenta* Clothes bought 



11 Amity Street, Amhkkst, Ma^. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this WOl includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most .stylish and 
best in the market. 

NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



io8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'05. — The Munson-Whitaker company have pub- 
lished recently a new, finely illustrated, advertising 
booklet entitled "The Scientific Care of Trees." 
We note with interest that they now have offices in 
Boston, New York, Albany, and Harrisburg. They 
number among their patrons such men as President 
Theodore Roosevelt, Oyster Bay, L. I. ; John D. 
Rockefeller, Pocantico Hills. N. Y. ; and J. P. M jr 
gan, Glen Cove, L. I. 

'05. — A. N. Swain has detached himself from the 
employ of H. L. Frost & Co. and has set up in busi- 
ness for himself, with headquarters at Worcester. 

'06. H. B. Filer has been appointed city fores 
ter for the city of Newark. N. J. 

Ex- '07. — Chester L. Shaw was inarri d Jan. 29 
to Miss Lena M. Baldwin, at Brockton. At home 
after March 1 at 54 North M=im St., Middleboro. 



Irvttrrolltgitvte. 



A new society h?o been started by some Columbia 
students. The name is " Tne Doonei. " The first 
and essential requirement for membership is that a 
man shall be at least six feet in height, but it has 
been dubbed a "fussers" club. After a man has 
proved himself eligible for membership he is put 
through the first degree. This consists in standing 
opposite the entrance of Barnard college on a rainy 
day until a girl with no umbrella comes out. The 
man is then to go up and offer to share his um- 
brella with her, ar.d if possible see that she gets home 
safely. For the second degree the man must obtain 
entrance to a show at Barnard from which men are 
supposed to be excluded. To pass the third degree 
ih= man must take a young woman to the theater, 
occupying a box with her alone at one of the monthly 
theater parties of "The Doones. " If the young 
woman comes up to "Doone" standards the man is 
declared a full-fledged member. 

0O1.LEOB CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 



t9t Main Sirket, 



NORTHAMPTON. 



Eveiytliing cooked to order. 
C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



IIOLYOKK. MASS. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinaen with 

music. 

KINK ( AKK OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 
and Class Dinners. 

<;K<>. H. KOWKKIt & CO. 



THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 

Most Attractive Cafe in New England. 

Private Dining BOOM for LadiM ami Theuii '•• l'anir*. 

('las* and Fraternity Banquets a ■pMtatt*', 

Try our Special Sunday Dinner-, I r. at. to 8.M r m., IOc. 

When in town give us a trial and Ir- convinced 

Opeu until midnight. 

KDWARI) A. LEW18, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - - Holvokk, |f«\M. 

Telephone connection ■ 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Krater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PUKES 

I). H. KENDMCK. Proprietor. 



Rabar's Jim, 



old South Street, off Main, 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hainp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITV. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



the: college signal 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 20. 1907 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should be addressed. Cou-tot Siohal. Amhbrst. Mam. Tub Siomal will be 
sent to all subscribers until Its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receite their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. __ _ ____ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
CLINTON KING. 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 
RALPH JEROME WATTS. 1907. Business Manager. 
DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908. Assistant Editor. 
JOHN ROBERT PARKER. 1908. Assistant Business Manager. 
ARTHUR WILLIAM HICC1NS. 1907. Alumni Notes. EARLE GOODMAN BARTLETT, 1907. 

JOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes. ROLAND HALE VERBECK. 1908. 

GEORCE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR., 1909. ALLAN DANA FARRAR. 1908. 

ORWELL BURLTON BRIGGS. 1909. 



Terms: $1.00 per fear in advance. Single Copies, lOe. Poatage oataida el United States and Canada, Mc. extra. 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot- Ball Association, 
College Senate. 
Reading-Room Association, 
Basket-ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S 

C. H. White. Pros. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C Peters. Pre*. 
J.N. Summers. Sec. 
E. D. Philbrtck. Manager. 



DIRECTORY. 

Athletic Association. 

Base- Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Indet. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sac. 
T. A. Barry. Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peter*. Pre*. 
C. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Poet Office at Amherst. 

tltn%Tl% % UHHUI IVIMIl 



l£di"tb rials. 



The Signal expresses its sympathy to Captain 
Martin in the unfortunate injury which will keep him 
away from college duty for many tedious days. In 
this connection we are pleased to say that the drills 
are proceeding with their usual precision and regu- 
larity and we hope this will be continued until the 
commandant is with us again. The morale of the 
battalion must be kept up constantly if it is to make a 
good appearance at commencement. 

At prom, time when so many fair friends of the 
college are about some students entirely fail to appre- 
ciate one of the best features of the annual affair. 
This is the unreserved manner in which the members 
of the faculty throw open their houses for the recep- 
tion of guests. The attention of The Signal has 
been called to one gentleman in particular who 
surrendered his entire house to a party of juniors. 
Such action as this must surely result in more or less 
inconvenience and altogether too little credit is given 



for it, we believe. Incidents of this kind go a long 
ways toward proving the real interest and regard 
which the members of the faculty have for the stu- 
dents of the college. 



As Clark hall slowly nears completion many are 
beginning to consider the problem of satisfactorily 
working the old Stockbridge house into a landscape 
design. It must be admitted that at present the old 
building with its sheds and haystack is decidedly ugly 
and it is no wonder that some would like to see it torn 
down. But many of the older alumni have associa- 
tions connected with these rooms where Levi Stock- 
bridge made up the formulae of his famous fertilizers 
which it would be almost cruel to shatter. In the 
hands of the proper person it would apparently be pos- 
sible to remove the obnoxious features and by a judic- 
ious renovation fit the house for a more important 
service than as a residence for a farm employe. 
Herein lies a proposition which should recommend 
itself to the committee recently appointed to make 
plans in regard to the arrangement of buildings, etc. 
By all means save the old Stockbridge house ! 



no 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tti 



It is a pleasure for those who are now students at 
Massachusetts but who expect, sooner or later, to be 
numbered among the alumni to read of such interest- 
ing gatherings as that at Boston on the first of this 
month. The Boston alumni c'- b has always had the 
best interests of the college at heart and we may 
expect their earnest co-operation when needed for the 
furtherance of that end. Particularly commendable 
are the resolutions, adopted at the recent meeting 
and printed in this issue, which recognize the benefits 
received by the college from the Massachusetts 
society for promoting agriculture and which also 
endorse President Butterfield's attitude on college 
extension work. We anticipate another overflow of 
college spirit at the Springfield banquet tomorrow 
evening for the Connecticut Valley association always 
keeps in close touch with the college. Then, too, 
there will be a large delegation from the working force 
of the college and experiment station to lend the 
enthusiasm of resident graduates to that of those gone 
out into the world. These gatherings during the win- 
ter months reflect great credit upon the loyalty of M. 
A. C. alumni and are of much practical utility to the 
college. 



ment station workers in either large cities or in towns 
of from five to twenty-five thousand inhabitants. It 
would be a travesty to say that such localities are 
"rural communities" or that there is anything "agri- 
cultural" connected with them. With these condi- 
tions before us we believe that, in our courses of law, 
economics, sociology and so on down the line, a due 
proportion of time should be spent in the discussion of 
problems in the business, financial and economic 
world. Few of us are to be in any rational sense 
"farmers" ; none of us in the meaning of the word 
as used in the Mississippi valley. Shall the college 
force the eternal agricultural problem upon us or shail 
we be allowed by the grace of the powers above to 
become broadly educated scientists ? 



There are those among the student body at Mass- 
achusetts who think that we have to hear almost too 
much about matters "agricultural" and "rural." 
We go into the class-room and a lecturer tells us that 
his course will be along strictly agricultural lines. We 
take a course in economics and the word agriculture 
greets us in Hearst headlines at every turn. We go 
to a presidential inauguration and the rural problem is 
stated, investigated and solved by the different speak- 
ers in our very presence. And it is well that it is so, 
for where else could we get such an education in this 
grand old commonwealth? At the same time it 
should be remembered that a very, very small number 
of our graduates will settle down In places where 
much benefit will be derived from this particular line 
of study. At least we hope that our college friends 
and classmates will not be marooned in such localities 
as Shutesbury or Pelham, over yonder, and these are 
the places to which most of the "rural problems" will 
apply. A large and increasing number of M. A. C. 
men become landscape gardeners, florists, city for- 
esters, entomologists, chemists, teachers and experi- 



The different instructors during the first two years 
of our college curriculum exhibit a praiseworthy 
attempt to give thorough and complete courses in 
their several subjects. In a limited time and under 
adverse conditions they do remarkably good work and 
lay a strong foundation for future needs. At the 
same time it is only under the most high pressure 
that the desired result Is reached. This pressure 
attains its culmination in the second semester of the 
sophomore year and falls away rapidly to nothingness 
in the senior year. The Signal does not object par- 
ticularly to the large amount of time required in prep- 
aration of freshman and sophomore studies ; most 
people come to this college to study more or less 
anyway. It does seem, however, as if the under- 
classmen should be given time for outside reading 
and an opportunity to keep in touch with current 
events. Never in after life will much of an opportun- 
ity be given one for such work and therefore it should 
be allowed in every college be it scienafic or classical. 
Not many days ago the writer of this editorial was 
approached by a man who having flunked a "math" 
subject in bitter tones declared that he had learned his 
lesson and should cut out all reading of books, maga- 
zines and papers for the rest of the year. This inci- 
dent was all the more striking because the student in 
question is about the only one around college whom 
the writer has found at all conversant with outside 
affairs. Right here is the beginning of that indiffer- 
ence to public events and to politics which is so 
marked in college men. Once the average M. A. C. 



student gets into the grind of the mill he loses any 
real interest in the world outside of his own line of 
work. The Signal believes that the lower-class stu- 
dents here should be given a greater opportunity to 
keep in touch with history as it is being made. 



Colleg? NottS- 



— D. E. Bailey of Tewksbury has joined the fresh- 
man class. 

—Leslie C. Bartlett, MO, has left M. A. C. and 
entered Dartmouth. 

— G. H. Allen, '05, paid a short visjt to the col- 
lege the first of the month. 

— Jesse G. Curtis, ex- '07, and Mrs. Curtis were 
recent visitors at the college. 

— M. M. Browne and A. J. Wheeldon, former 
members of the junior class, returned for the prom, 
of last week. 

— The fad of snowshoeing has struck the college 
with great energy this winter and many devotees of the 
sport have appeared. 

— On Feb. 5th Professor Cooley and Mr. Ellis of 
the trustees spoke at a legislative hearing in support 
a bill advocating a more satisfactory milk standard. 

— The law concerning the rushing of freshmen for 
the different fraternities was "off" for four days of 
last week. It Is now "on" again until the first of 
June. 

— In the January number of the Kansas Agricul- 
tural Review appears an article upon "Diseases of the 
Sweet Potato" by George F. Freeman a former 
instructor in botany at M. A. C. 

— H. F. Thompson, '05, assumed his duties as 
instructor in market gardening and supervisor of field 
work at the college on Feb. I. Mr. Halllgan will 
continue as instructor in horticulture. 

— The President read Governor Guild's proclama- 
tion on Lincoln day at chapel but it was shorn of its 
formality and its picturesque effect by the omission of 
the preamble and the inspiring close — "God save the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts." 

— Mr. Shultis, who has done so much for the local 
Y. M. C. A. announces that he is about to make 
some additions to the association's library. At an 



early date he will furnish a lecturer with stereoptlcon 
slides for an evening's entertainment. 

— This afternoon the senior class In rural law went 
to Northampton as the guests of Judge Lyman and 
visited the registry of deeds and court-house. The 
machinery of the county's judicial system was hastily 
looked over and all gained an idea of its Importance. 

— At a recent meeting of the trustees, Edward A. 
White, '95, now a member of the faculty of the 
Connnecticut agricultural college, was elected assist - 
professor of floriculture at M. A. C. Professor 
White will assume his new duties at the opening of 
the next college year. 

— The following publications are reviewed quite 
extensively in the Experiment Station Record for Janu- 
ary : "Twenty-first report of the state entomologist 
on Injurious and other insects of New York" by E. P. 
Felt, '91, and " Report of the state entomologist of 
Georgia for 1905" by R. I. Smith, '01. 

— The Oliver Dickinson guild, a men's club con- 
nected with the NorthAmherst Congregational church, 
met In their parish hall on the evening of Feb. 1 1th 
and listened to an address by President Butterfield 
who spoke on "Co-operation for rural progress." 
Music was rendered by the college orchestra. 

— On Feb. 5th the governor signed the petition, 
submitted by the experiment station people, asking that 
the name be changed from "Hatch" to "Massachu- 
setts Agricultural Experiment Station." In accord- 
ance with this act all literature pertaining to the 
station, letter-heads, etc., will be changed as soon as 
practicable. 

— Owing to the pervalence of scarlet fever at 
Amherst college the greatest precautions are being 
taken to prevent an outbreak here. The young ladies 
attending the junior prom, from Mt. Hoiyoke came 
over the mountain in sleighs to avoid the risk of 
infection on the street railway. Professor Neal hav- 
ing been exposed to the disease is under quarantine. 

— The following committees of the senior class have 
been elected : Class cup, G. H. Chapman, F. A. 
Cutter, W. F. Chace ; promenade, G. H. Chapman, 
C. B. Thompson, A. H. Armstrong, E. H. Shaw, 
M. H. Clark, S. D. Livers; banquet, J. O. Chap- 
man, H. E. Alley, A. A. Hartford ; class picture, R. 
J. Watts, C. M. Parker, J. N. Summers. The 



112 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i*3 



supervision of all other matters connected with com- 
mencement is left with the following committee, W. 
F. Chace, W. E. Dickinson, E. G. Bartlett and 
Clinton King. 

— Prof. R. S. Lull, who was for many years asso- 
ciate professor of zoology here and who is now assist- 
ant professor of paleontology and assistant curator of 
the Peabody museum at Yale university recently gave 
an illustrated lecture upon "The evolution of the 
elephant" before the Yale geological club. Professor 
Lull is making a thorough study of the history of the 
elephant especially the American elephant and masto- 
don. Since leaving Amherst he has been classifying 
and arranging a series of specimens illustrative of the 
development of the horse. He has at his disposal one 
of the finest collections in the country. His work is 
now displayed in the vertebrate room of the Peabody 
museum. 



THE JUNIOR PROM. 

The annual promenade of the junior class was held 
in the drill hall on the evening of Feb. 15. In 
respect to attendance the function far outdistanced 
any of its immediate predecessors while the decora- 
tions were of a high standard. Many visitors were 
present from out-of-town and from other colleges. 
The hall was decorated with maroon and white bunt- 
ing festooned about the three arc lights overhead and 
completely concealing the rafters. The walls were 
divided into panels by white strips and the background 
of each filled with evergreen and lighted by a small 
electric light. Bunting was also used to hide the row 
of steam pipes near the floor. Under the entire 
length of the balcony was arranged a series of cosy 
booths well decorated with portieres and containing 
easy chairs and corner seats with the ever-present 
sofa pillow. About two-thirds of the hall was reserved 
for dancing and the net filled with evergreen was 
arranged at this point with an opening into the north 
part. Over the opening appeared in large white let- 
ters the word Massachusetts. Directly opposite at 
the south end was an electric sign with the numerals, 
1908. The orchestra occupied a stage on the east 
side of the hall and directly across on the western 
side were seated the patronesses. Plants from ths 
college greenhouse were tastefully arranged at differ- 
ent points. Music was furnished by Derrick's 



orchestra. The programs were of gray leather with 
the college seal embossed in gold. 

The patronesses were Mrs. Kenyon L. But'erfield, 
Mrs. Charles Wellirgton, Mrs. George E. Stone, 
Mrs. Philip B. Hasbrouck, Mrs. George C. Martin, 
Mrs. Clarence E. Gordon of Amherst and Mrs. C. 
S. Philbrick of West Somerville. 

The committee of arrangements consisted of J. 

A. Hyslop of Rutherford, N.J. chairman, Prof. P. 

B. Hasbrouck, Capt. G. C. Martin, J. R. Parker of 
Poquonnock, Conn., E. D. Philbrick of West Som- 
erville, George R. Cobb of Amherst, R. H. Jackson 
of Amherst, T. L. Warner of Sunderland, H. C. 
Chase of Swampscott, J. A. Anderson of North 
Brookfield, Miss Olive Turner of Amherst and Miss 
Bartholomew of Melrose Highlands. 

Among the young ladies present were Miss Lillian 
M. Gray of Pepperell, Miss Mae Phillips of Amherst, 
Miss Hazel D. Jennison of Millbury, Miss Hattie L. 
Whiting of Stoughton, Miss Annabel Root of Cleve- 
land, O., Miss Alice G. Bryant of Mt. Holyoke, 
Miss Mabel K. Farrar of Amherst, Miss Emma F. 
Nichols of Reading, Miss Dorothy Whitmore of 
Worcester, Mrs. J. G. Curtis of New York, Miss 
Cecile Deboury of New York city, Miss Rachel 
Brooks of Amherst, Miss Margaret Lee of Tewks- 
bury, Miss Helen Wilson of South Hadley, Miss 
Harriet M. Cobb of Amherst, Miss Locke of East- 
hampton, Miss Pratt of Mt. Holyoke, Miss Sarah 
Cowles of North Amherst, Miss Elizabeth M. Nut- 
ting of Ware, Miss Florence E. Sanborn of Somer- 
ville, Miss Marjorie D. Verbeck of Maiden, Miss 
Esther Browne of Maiden, Miss Bertha Harlow and 
Miss Bertha Bolles of Amherst, Miss Margaret 
Loughan of Mt. Holyoke, Miss Mildred V. Newton 
of Worcester, Miss Mae E. Allen of Worcester. 
Miss Laura D. Miller of Providence, Miss Ethel 
Burnham of Holyoke, Miss Edith Gilmore of Salem. 
N. Y., Miss Gilhouley of Rutherford, N. J., Miss 
Hyslop of Rutherford, N. J., Miss Frances Whipple 
and Miss Jessie Locke of Mt. Holyoke, Miss Grace 
E. Hixson of Manville, R. I., Miss Rachel Wads- 
worth of Hadley, Miss Lincoln and Mrs. A. T. 
Atkins of Northampton. 

On the morning after the prom, the usual sleighing 
parties were in order. The air was balmy and the 
snow hard leaving nothing to be desired so far as the 



weather was concerned. A large number traversed 
the hilly and picturesque road to Belchertown, others 
went "up north" to the Deerfields and back down the 
west bank of the river and a few pushed up beyond 
Sunderland and Mount Toby to the town of Montague. 
Returning late in the evening, the parties made 
Amherst town resound with the jingle of sleigh bells. 
Then a few hasty partings on the following day and 
the greatest event of the junior year was over existing 
only as a pleasant memory for the days to come. 



Athletic Notts- 



For the past two weeks sporting affairs have been 
very quite at M. A. C. First the final exams, and 
then the necessary preparations for and carrying off 
of the prom, have stifled any efforts in the line of 
basketball. Even the strenuous inter-dormitory 
games have lapsed and the scene of several notable 
victories this year has been converted into a veritable 
paradise for the annual junior ball. Next Friday 
evening however the spell will be broken in a game 
with Brown and we shall need all of the confidence 
of a home floor against that aggregation. Then fol- 
low games on the 25th with the university of Ver- 
mont at Amherst ; on the 27th, with Williams at Wil- 
liams at Williamstown ; Mar. 1, with a military com- 
pany in Ogdensburg, N. Y. ; and on the 2d with 
St. Lawrence university at Canton, N. Y. This will 
wind up a very good season for Massachusetts and 
baseball will then come into the limelight. Thus 
it happens that this time The Signal can do no bet- 
ter than make a few promises of what is to come in 
the next week or two for no games have been played 
since the last issue appeared. 



CHANGE OF SIGNAL EDITORS. 

Attention is called to the fact that the competition 
for editorial positions on The Signal board will close 
on Mar. 1st, instead of the 4th as stated previously. 
It is especially desirable that members of the freshman 
class should qualify for election as they have up to 
the present shown little interest in the paper. The 
present editorial management will cease its labors 
with the issue of Mar. 6, unless unforeseen incidents 
arise. 



A NEED. 

In many of the agricultural colleges but perhaps in 
the western colleges particularly strong courses in 
animal husbandry and livestock judging have been 
established and maintained at a high standard and 
with a great degree of practical utility. In speaking 
of the recent International Livestock Exposition held 
in Chicago during the week of Dec. 3d, the Experi- 
ment Station Record says : "As in previous years, 
the students from the colleges were most liberally 
represented, Iowa, Illinois, and Minnesota sent over 
100 each, and smaller delegations came from Vir- 
ginia, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, 
Texas, Colorado, Nebraska, North Dakota, Kansas, 
and Ontario. During the exposition the American 
Federation of Agricultural Students held an enthus- 
iastic meeting. The students' stock-judging con- 
test was participated in by six institutions, Ontario 
agricultural college led in the work with cattle and 
sheep and once more scored the highest total of 
points, followed by Iowa, Ohio, Kansas, Michigan 
and Texas. Iowa won back from Ohio the horse- 
judging trophy, and Kansas made the best record 
with swine." 

This extract shows us among other things one of 
the courses which we lack, though it is a requisite of 
the modern student in animal husbandry. We have 
here an excellent course in dairying, so far as milk 
and its products are concerned, and also In other 
branches of agriculture except this one thing, and this, 
important to those who expect to take up some form 
of animal husbandry as their life work, is absent and 
cannot be obtained unless the student has the time to 
take up outside some practical work along the line. 
To be sure there is a lecture course In a small portion 
of this work given in the sophomore year but 
this is given in a manner, which lends to 
it no attraction and gives no encouragement 
to pursue it farther, and even if one has come here 
for the express purpose of following up this line it is 
hard work for him to convince himself that he can get 
anything from it because of the existing conditions. 

Statistics show that in proportion to area the num- 
ber of horses, cattle, sheep and swine owned in Mas- 
sachusetts does not rank far below the states named 
above whose agricultural students were present at the 
international and participated in the stock-judging 



"4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



"5 



contests. Now the question rises why should we not 
have a strong course in this branch? Why should 
we not be able to compete with these other colleges ? 
Why should we not graduate men in the field of ani- 
mal husbandry who would make a name for them- 
selves and for the college? We have now a new 
barn, rapidly nearing completion, built for the use of 
the college and why cannot a space be set apart in 
this to be devoted to work in the study of livestock 
judging ? This is a great need and one which must 
be met sooner or later as the college tends to grow 
and the interests of the students demand it. It is to 
be hoped that the present sophomores at least will 
have an opportunity to test the merits of such a 
course. 



BOSTON ALUMNI RESOLUTIONS. 

The full text of the resolutions adopted at the 
annual meeting of the Massachusetts agricultural 
college alumni club of Boston held at Young's hotel 
on Feb. 1 , are as follows : — 

First. It has come to the knowledge of this 
alumni association that the Massachusetts Society 
for Promoting Agriculture, the oldest agricultural 
organization in the country, through the solicitation 
and personal interest of Mr. N. I. Bowditch, a trustee 
of that society and of our college, has donated to our 
Alma Mater during the past five years, about 
$2000.00 which has been devoted to carrying on a 
short course in dairying or the so-called Winter 
Dairy school at Amherst, which school has been 
attended, each winter, by forty or fifty students, men 
and women from different parts of the state, and at 
its close in March, when certificates are awarded, 
a banquet is given by the society to the graduating 
class. Without this financial aid, it is doubtful if 
this work could have been undertaken by the college ; 
a work which has proved to be very useful and very 
popular in the state and a means of making the col- 
lege better known and extending its influence. 
Therefore, be it 

Resolved: That the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College Alumni Club of Boston, here assembled, 
extends its heartfelt thanks to the old society and to 
Mr. Bowditch for their active interest and generous 
support of the college in this form of college exten- 
sion work. 



Second. In the establishment of the dairy school, 
first promoted in our college by Professor Brooks, we 
recognize the beginning of what is to be hereafter 
known as "College Extension Work," — a work 
which is to bring not only our own college, but all the 
land grant colleges of the country into closer touch 
with the people. Therefore, be it 

Resolved \ That we heartily endorse the efforts of 
our new President, Mr. Butterfleld, in this new 
undertaking, and pledge him our active support, 
recognizing that he stands as the pioneer and expon- 
ent of a new departure in agricultural education. 

Third. We especially feel honored that President 
Butterf ield should be selected as the chairman of the 
committee on extension work of all the agricultural 
colleges, and therefore, as their recognized leader, 
he should be heartily encouraged, at home as well as 
abroad, and especially by this body of alumni, In 
order that not alone shall he lead the other colleges, 
but that he shall lead our college as well in this new 
field. Recognizing that this work cannot be under- 
taken at Amherst without financial aid, be it further 

Resolved: That the executive officers of this 
association be instructed to petition the legislature, 
asking for an appropriation of not less than $5000.00, 
annually, to be used by the Massachusetts agricul- 
tural college in carrying on extension work in this 
state along lines as suggested in the report of the 
national committee in circular 72 of the United 
Sta»es department of agriculture just issued. 



APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

[The following is a contributed article. Thb Signal will not be respon- 
sible for opinions or statements contained therein.— Ed.1 

According to our catalogue there are no recitations 
on Saturdays to allow men to work and earn money. 
The Bible says, "Remember the Sabbath day and 
keep it holy." How much time is there left in a 
week? Five days, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday. The sophomore class has at 
present twenty nine hours of classwork and drill. Of 
this twenty- two hours are recitations requiring a min- 
imum of one and one-half hours of outside study. 
No professor will ask less than this, many expect two 
or three hours. Twenty-two times one and a half is 
33=time for preparation. We allow eight hours for 
sleep, a total of forty hours in five days and three 



a day for going to and from and eating our meals. 
Chapel takes one and a quarter hours per week, while 
changing clothes before and after drill will require 
one-half hour a day, three days per week. Total 
one and a half hours. To recapitulate, 29 hours in 
classroom, 33 hours for preparation, 40 hours for 
sleep, 15 hours for meals, 1 1-4 hours for chapel, 
1 1-2 hours preparing for drill. Total 1 19 3-4 hours 
for five days. Five times 24 is 120 hours. Sub- 
tracting 119 3-4 from 120 leaves 1-4 of an hour in 
each week. Questions: ( 1) How much time is left 
for recreation and culture ? (2) Shall we go to Y. M. 
C. A.? (3) Prexy is quoted as having said in chapel : 
"I make a plea for your wasted moments." Shall 
we give them to him ? (4) How shall we make up 
our conditions? We would solicit a reply in the next 
Signal from someone who has more time to spend in 
solving such questions than we have. 

Four Sophomores. 



AN INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS. 

The Signal, is in receipt of a circular calling atten- 
tion to the seventh international zoological congress 
which is to be held Aug. 19th to 23d, 1907 at Boston. 
This is the first time that the congress which is com- 
posed of the most distinguished scientists in the world 
has met ot the American continent. The gathering 
will be divided into sections covering each department 
of the general subject and each section will transact 
its business separately under the supervision of a gen- 
eral committee. Any person interested in zoology 
can become a member upon application to the presi- 
dent and the payment of a small fee. 

The program for next summer's congress is divided 
up so that all the important zoological centers of 
eastern United States may be visited. Several ses- 
sions will be held at the new Harvard medical school 
in Boston, then the party will spend a day at the 
Woods Hole biological laboratory and pass on to 
points of interest about New York. The itinerary 
will end at Washington where the government 
museums and departments will be inspected. It is 
probable that a considerable number of M. A. C. 
graduates will attend the Boston sessions at least and 
the entomological and zoological departments of 
instruction at the college will have representatives 
present. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL RESUMED. 

Sunday chapel was resumed on the I Oth after hav- 
ing been discontinued for three and a half years. On 
that morning Rev. David Sprague, rector of Grace 
church in Amherst was in charge and K. E. Gillett, 
'08, rendered an excellent cornet solo. On the fol- 
lowing Sunday the Rev. Mr. Brodie of Auburndale 
preached and George Chase, '10, furnished special 
music. The hour and arrangement of the services 
is still in a somewhat experimental stage, being now 
so arranged that anyone can attend services In the 
town churches after the chapel is over. The attend- 
ance has so far been good and interest seems to 
warrant the continuance of the exercise. 



FRATERNITY ELECTIONS. 

The following men have joined the different frater- 
nities of the college : — 

Q. T. V. ; Cloes, Eldridge, Haynes, Kelley, 
Prouty, Schermerhorn, Thomas, Turner, Waldron 
and Whitney. 

♦. 2. K. ; Annis.S. C. Brooks, H. A. Brooks, 
Dickinson, Damon, Hastings, Orr, Smith, Stalker, 
Stockwell, and Titus. 

C. S. C. ; Blaney, Call, W. E. Leonard, Nielsen, 
Sullivan and Woodward. 

K. 2.; Allen, Beeman, Brandt, Brown, Clark, 
Curtis, Holland, L. E. Leonard, McLane, New- 
comb, Robb and Urban. 



THE THIRD ASSEMBLY. 

It was fitting that at the gathering of the students 
on Feb. 12 the subject of the talk should be "Abra- 
ham Lincoln." Professor Grosvenor of Amherst 
college was to have lectured on the life of this great 
statesman, but the funeral of Professor Garman on the 
same afternoon rendered it imperative that he should 
be absent. Instead President Butterfield read anec- 
dotes, reminicer.ses and comments upon the life of 
Mr. Lincoln and several patriotic airs were sung. 



CAPTAIN MARTIN INJURED. 

On Sunday Feb. 10, as Captain Martin, 18th U. 
S. Infantry, professor of military science at the col- 
lege, was passing along the sidewalk between Deuel's 
drug store and the Amherst house he slipped on a 
piece of ice and in trying to recover his balance broke 



i.6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



117 



the large bone of his leg, two or three inches above 
the ankle. The break which is said to be clean is 
expected to mend rapidly, but for some time the cap- 
tain will be confined to his room. His recitations 
will be discontinued for the present and Cadet-major 
W. E. Dickinson, '07, as acting commandant, will 
have charge of the drills. 



s 



emm&rs. 



HORTICULTURE. 
Arthur W. Higgins, '07, gave an interesting talk 
before the senior horticulture class on Monday, Feb. 
11. Mr. Higgins related his personal experiences in 
starting a florist business on a small scale, his special- 
ties being asters and sweet peas. His success with 
these flowers gave the courage to invest his surplus 
capital in a tiny greenhouse, eighteen by twenty-five 
feet. This he does not attempt to utilize during the 
winter, but, early in the spring, asters and varieties of 
vegetable plants are started in the house, heat being 
furnished by a flue running from a small stove in the 
rear. Mr. Higgins has been particularly successful 
In raising chrysanthemums for his fall greenhouse 
crop. This account goes to show that a person can 
accomplish things in even a small way in an enter- 
prise of this nature. "Just begin" as the old proverb 
runs and success is sure to follow. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Thursday evening, Feb. 7th, Mr. Barton, president 
of the Amherst college Y. M. C. A., addressed the 
meeting of the association. He gave a very interest- 
ing talk on the "Mountain Whites of Kentucky," a 
subject with which few of us, if any, are familiar. 
Mr. Barton spent his boyhood days in the mountain 
regions of Kentucky and received his preparatory edu- 
cation at Bereae college. This institution he particu- 
larly mentioned as being worthy of our charities since 
it is doing such a noble work in placing before these 
rude mountaineers the opportunity of an education. 

Tucked away In the back-yards of four states, 
Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia, 
are three millions of souls of whom we know little. 
Three times they have figured prominently in the 
nation's history yet historians have made no mention 
of them. It was these mountain folk who, in 1771, 



faced the Virginia governor, Tryon, in a protest against 
taxation without representation, and left the field of 
battle only after two hundred of their number had been 
killed. Again in the war of the Revolution the British 
general Cornwallis met his first decisive defeat at the 
hands of the mountaineers in the battle of King's 
Mountain. And it was due to the loyalty of these 
same people that, in later years, when the harmony 
of our nation was rent in twain Kentucky remained 
firmly for the Union. The modern conception of 
these people has been one in which bloody feuds and 
mid-night raids on moon-shine distilleries have largely 
figured. But they are pictured far worse than they 
really are. Thanks to an efficient revenue service 
and to the growing influences of civilization these 
things are becoming memories of the past. The 
home life of these mountaineers is rude and uncouth. 
It Is with the utmost difficulty that they support their 
large families on the scanty product of their hillside 
farms. Their hospitality, however, is unbounded and 
the stranger is always welcome to share the corn pone 
and black coffee of their frugal fare. With the 
advent of the railroads the country is becoming 
developed and the strong arm of the nation has reached 
in to draw them out from their long darkness into the 
light of civilization. 

Rev. Mr. Shattuck of Easthampton lead the meet- 
ing of the Y. M. C. A. Thursday evening, Feb. 14th. 
He spoke on "Religious Grudges" and went on to 
show how the young men of today are shirking their 
religious responsibilities. They are not willing or 
capable to assume the duties which one must neces- 
sarily accept as a member of a religious denomina- 
tion. The men of the previous generation who have 
been factors in sustaining the excellent morale of our 
communities find no one to accept the yoke with 
which they have been burdened. In the busy, hum- 
drum life of today we are too apt to let worldly things 
influence us exclusively, and the loftier deeds and 
thoughts we pass by on the other side. 

STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 

Friday evening, Feb. 8th, Professor Cooley gave a 
talk on the Holstein-Friesian breed in the chapel 
auditorium. The lecture was illustrated by stereopti- 
con slides of famous individuals of the breed and their 
records were discussed. It is a rather interesting fact 
to note that the milk and butter records of the world 



are held by Holstein-Friesian cows. 

Mr. Frank S. Peer of Leyden spoke before the 
Stockbridge club Tuesday evening Feb. 1 2th. The 
subject was "Farming on the Island of Jersey" and 
Mr. Peer gave a most interesting account of the island 
home of the famous Jersey breed. He described 
briefly the methods of selection in regard to the cattle 
for registration during the last fifty years. No cow is 
registered until she has given birth to her first calf, 
and, if she does not come up to the standard, she is 
consigned to the butcher's knife. The Island has a 
population of fifty -five thousand souls and every year 
there are visitors to the island to the number of forty 
thousand. "let the island supports both the permanent 
and this transient population and, besides, exports 
yearly three millions dollars worth of agricultural 
products, principally early potatoes for the English 
markets. The potatoes are harvested when about the 
size of hens' eggs in order to reach the market early, 
and the average price received is one dollar a bushel. 
There are only ten thousand acres of arable land on 
the island so one can imagine that rather intensive 
farming has to be practiced. 



D?p&rtmtrvf fto-t?s. 



ENTOMOLOGY. 

The collection of scale insects of the station 
which has hitherto been kept in exhibition cases and 
mounted on pins, is now being rearranged. The 
vibration of the pins as the trays are moved about, 
has frequently caused the scales to loosen and drop 
off from the plants to which they were attached ; and 
to obviate this difficulty they are now being placed in 
pasteboard trays resting upon cotton, these trays 
being of such sizes as to form units and multiples 
thereof. In this way the specimens are equally acces- 
sible for study and exhibition, while all danger of their 
loss by shaking loose from the pins is avoided. 

The distribution of insects in Massachusetts is 
affected to a large extent by mean annual tempera- 
tures, and these in turn are determined by elevation. 
A contour map of the state, showing differences of 
elevation for each five hundred feet, has been pre- 
pared for the use of the insectary, with thi idea of 
using the data thus obtained to determine the possible 
spread of Injurious forms. This map shows that the 



eastern part of the state, the area south of Worces- 
ter, and the Connecticut valley are the lowest parts 
of Massachusetts, and have the highest average 
annual temperature, and are also the parts most 
likely to be infested by insect pests which are nearly 
at their northern limit. During the coming season 
it is hoped to obtain data of the distribution of the 
elm leaf-beetle, to determine if this pest will be of 
any importance in the more elevated portions of the 
state, the data on nand, indicating that it is not 
likely to do much damage above the 500 or at 
least 1000 foot level. If from the study of eleva- 
tions and isotherms it should prove possible to deter- 
mine the limits within which any particular Insect may 
be injurious, such data would be of great use to the 
people of the state. 

HORTICULTURE. 

This department has been given charge of the jun- 
ior forestry work, and the following schedule has been 
prepared : 

Week beginning May 20, week of May 27, and 
week of June 3. Each week three lectures and one 
field exercise, as follows: Thursday 11-15, lecture; 
Thursday 2-30, lecture; Friday 9-15, lecture; Fri- 
day afternoon, field exercise. The course will be 
required only of those taking horticulture and land- 
scape gardening as elective courses. 

On Friday, Feb. 15, Prof. F. A. Wajgh was present 
at and took part in a school garden conference held 
in Lorimer hall, Tremont Temple, Boston. The 
delegates at the conference were school superinten- 
dents and professors and instructors in the various 
branches of "nature" studies. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Director William P. Brooks of the Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station has been placed In 
charge of the joint exhibits of the experiment sta- 
tion and Massachusetts agricultural college which will 
be made at Jamestown exposition during the coming 
summer and fall. 

It has been anticipated that the Massachusetts 
agricultural college and experiment station would 
enter co-operation with the agricultural colleges and 
experiment stations of Vermont and New Hampshire 
in again sending out at the proper season a "Bitter 
Farming Special," but the arrangements are at present 



n8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



119 



doubtful In their probability. The necessary financial 
support in the two states to the north is not as yet 
assured, and there seems to be some doubt as to 
whether it will be tendered. The movement in this 
line last year has, however, attracted the attention of 
the states to the immediate south, and it may be 
possible for Massachusetts to enter into the movement 
co-operatively with Connecticut .provided the Connecti- 
cut legislature backs the movement financially. The 
necessary funds for Massachusetts' share in the move- 
ment are already available. Another obstacle may 
appear in the attitude of the president of the Boston 
& Maine railroad. The anti-free-pass legislation in 
Vermont has, in his opinion, made it impossible for 
his special train to carry free of charge the Instructors 
and train assistants who would have to accompany the 
Better Farming Special. The same sort of legisla- 
tion is at present being pushed through in New Hamp- 
shire. Should the arrangements be made with Con- 
necticut, however, this latter objection would of course 
be obviated, and the train would for the most part 
pass over the lines of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford railroad. It is doubtful whether this line 
will furnish a train for the purpose. If no arrange- 
ments can be made with neighboring states either 
north or south, the project will have to be abandoned, 
for Massachusetts could not attempt the work alone. 



A1 



umni. 



NEW ALUMNI OFFICERS. 

In the last Signal the list of the newly elected 
officers of the Massachusetts alumni club and of the 
M. A. C. alumni club of Washington was omitted. 
The officers of the former association are as follows : 
President, A. H. Kirkland, '94 ; treasurer, W. A. 
Morse, '82 ; secretary, F. W. Davis, '89 ; directors, 
F. H. Read, '96, Madison Bunker, 75, H. W. 
Dana, '99, andM. E. Thompson, 71. 

At the meeting of the Washington club the follow- 
ing elections took place: President, R. B. Moore, 
'88; vice-presidents, S. M. Wiley, '98 and C. S. 
Crocker, '89 ; secretary and treasurer, F. D Cou- 
den, '04; choragus, C. H. Griffin, '04. 

The annual meeting and banquet of the Connecti- 
cut Valley alumni association will be held tomorrow 



evening at six in the Cooley hotel of Springfield. 
Late cars are arranged so as to enable Amherst 
people to get home after the affair is over. 

Ex- 75. — Henry L. Jackson, 516 Park Row, East 
Orange, N. J. 

76. — From The Architectural Record for January i 
"For some years but lately with increasing earnest- 
ness, G. A. Parker of Hartford, has been advocating 
the national government's systematic study of munici- 
pal park systems. Mr. Parker is superintendent of 
the Hartford parks, but he is so much more than that 
— such a park census bureau in himself, with a col- 
lection of classified and indexed park data not to 
be equalled anywhere — that park authorities scarcely 
mention his official position. And he is more than a 
statistician, for withal he is a man of singularly fine 
and right sentiment. So it happens that it means 
something when one says that G. A. Parker, of Hart- 
ford, is advocating an innovation. Returning to his 
theme at the recent convention of the American 
association of park superintendents, he read a paper 
which explained why he thinks municipal parks a 
proper subject of study by the national government. 
Mr. Parker said : "The indications are that within a 
generation or so about one-half of the nation's chil- 
dren will be born and brought up under urban conditions 
and that the city must depend upon its own children 
to an ever increasing extent to manage its affairs, it 
becoming impossible for the rural districts to furnish 
a sufficient number of young men and women for 
the city's needs, as in the past. It is therefore imper- 
ative that city conditions be made such that children 
city born and bred may have such environments as 
will enable them to grow into healthy and vigorous 
men and women, physically, mentally, morally and 
spiritually, and the function which is to have a most 
important bearing on this work is the park. The 
need is great, the resuit to be accomplished worthy 
of the nation's best effort, and conditions such that 
nothing short of a national work can bring it about." 
Turning to statistics, Mr. Parker noted that $12, 000,- 
000 is now annually expended in park work, and the 
government's guidance might, he believed, double 
the good done by the money expended. The govern- 
ment is already, through the Census Bureau, issuing 
a quantity of valuable statistics relating to parks. 
These assemble the similar facts, such as acreage, 



ownership, location and so on. Mr. Parker wants 
this work supplemented by investigations showing the 
popular use of p?rks, the nature of the enjoyment or 
recreation they offer, their influence, and from such 
investigations the preparation of comparative 
studies. 

'82. — "Types and Breeds of Farm Animals," is 
the title of a book by C. S. Plumb, now professor of 
animal husbandry in Ohio state university. Some 
170 pages are devoted to different types of horses, 
including the prehistoric horse, the Arab, the Ameri- 
can saddle, road and trotting horse, and the French 
and German coach and draft horse. In three consec- 
utive chapters may be found a history and description 
of the pony, ass and mule. The several breeds of 
beef and dairy cattle are exceedingly well described, 
and the records made by noted animals accurately 
recorded. Over 200 pages treat of the history and 
characteristics of sheep, goats and swine. All of 
the more important works primarily written along sim- 
ilar lines are noted at the close of each subject, and 
a very complete index is likewise included. The 
book comprising 562 pages is fully illustrated, the 
original photographs in many cases being taken by 
the author. It is evidently intended both for the stu- 
dent and practical stockman, and will surely be found 
helpful to all who desire a concise and up-to-date 
treatise on this most important industry. 

'90. — Fred J. Smith is with the Bowker Insecti 
cide company, corner Smith and Huntington Sts., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'92. — Dr. Richard P. Lyman of Hartford visited 
college recently. Dr. Lyman is secretary of the 
American veterinary medical association and president 
of the Connecticut state board of veterinary 
examiners. 

'94. — Elias D. White has removed from College 

Park, Ga. to 283 Lawton St., West End, Atlanta, Ga. 

'95. — Maurice J. Sullivan, superintendent of an 

immense estate at Littleton, N. H., visited Amherst 

recently. 

'95. — (Two years course.) Frederick G. Todd, 

landscape architect, fellow of the American society 

of landscape architects. Address, Renouf Building, 

Montreal, Canada. 

'99. — Miss Mary Woodbury Allen and William 



Geo. F. Vester Jr 



TAILOR 

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NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



120 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Anson Hooker were married Feb. 5, at the home of 
the bride's parents on Main St., Amherst. Rev. 
W. A. Estabrook of the Second Congregational 
church performed the ceremony. After a short wed- 
ding trip the couple will live in Washington, D. C, 
for a while and later go to Dallas, Tex. 

'00. — J. W. Kellogg, 197 Somerset avenue, New 
Brunswick, N. J. 

'01. — R. I. Smith's name appears as joint author 
of Bulletin 22 of the Georgia state board of entomol- 
ogy, devoted to the Black Rot disease of cotton. 
The bulletin takes up a very thorough study of the 
disease and its causes, and is a valuable addition to 
such literature. It is well illustrated. 

'02. — An extremely interesting bulletin has bem 
received from C. I. Lewis, horticulturalist of the 
Oregon experiment station on the subject "The Wal- 
nut in Oregon." Walnut growing seems to be an 
industry with a great future before It in Oregon, and 
the bulletin is very timely. Propagation, pruning, 
harvesting, marketing, varieties, diseases and insects, 
and the market are discussed in an interesting and 
thorough manner. A large number of views illustrat- 
ing the propagation and growth of the tree and its 
fruits also increase the value of the bulletin. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

President Hadley of Yale is somewhat skeptical of 
the value of chapel exercises at that institution. Says 
he : "I attend morning chapel regularly— partly be- 
cause I like to begin the day that way, but partly also 
because it Is a student ceremony. The faculty, with 
the exception of a few members who loyally serve as 
chaplains, has ceased to go to prayers. The institu- 
tion is kept up by student sentiment, which rather 
shrinks from a change that a large part of the faculty 
would be quite ready to make." 



COLLGOG CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

263 Main Strkkt, - - - NORTHAMPTON. 
Everything cooked to order. 



C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous* for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKKR & CO. 



THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 
Mast Attractive C afe in New Englan d. 

Private Dining Rooms for Ladies and Theatre Parties. 

Class and Fraternity Banquets a specialty. 

Try our Special Sunday Dinners, 5 p. m. to 8.30 p. m., 50c. 

When in town give us a trial and be convinced. 

Open until midnight. 

EDWARD A. LEWIS, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - - Holyokk, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp-to-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



Rabar's 3nn, 



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NORTHAMPTON, MA 88. 



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Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 6. 1907 



NO. II 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should bo addressed. Collbui Signal. Amhsrst. Mass. Thi Signal will be 
lent to all subscribers until 'ts discontinuance is ordered and arrears tre paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOASD OF EDITORS 

CLINTON KING 1907. Editor-in-Chief. 

RALPH JEROME WATTS. 1907. Business Manager. 

DANFORTH PARKER MILLER. 1908. Assistant Editor. 

JOHN ROBERT PARKER. 1908 Assistant Business Manager 
ARTHUR WILLIAM HIGGINS. 1907. Alumni Notes EARLE GOODMAN BARTLETT. 1907 

IOSEPH OTIS CHAPMAN. 1907. College Notes. ROLAND HALE VERBECK. 1908 

CEORGE TEWKSBURY RICHARDSON. JR.. 1909. ALLAN DANA FARRAR. 1908. 

ORWELL BURLTON BR1GGS. 1909. 



Term*: $t.OO par gear In adcaoce Single Copies, 10c. Postage estaids el United States and Canada, 8«c. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



T. M. C- A. 

Foot- Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Reading- Room Association 
Basket-ball Association. 



C. H. White. Pres. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
J.N. Summers. Sec. 
E. D. Philbrick. Manager. 



Athletic Association 

Base- Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard Se< 
T. A. Barry, Managai. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



■Cdi-tbri&ls. 



The Signal receives occasionally a letter from 
some subscriber finding fault because he happens to 
miss the regular copy of his paper. No doubt he has 
a very reasonable ground for complaint since having 
paid his subscription he is entitled to each issue in 
succession. Under present circumstances, however, 
there exists every possibility in the world for error. 
Every Signal which passes through the mail must be 
addressed by hand by one of the mailing clerks. 
Each name having to be written off separately, it is 
easy for a person to accidentally skip one especially 
when rushed for time. The only redress for this evil 
is the use of some kind of an "addressograph" which 
substitutes mechanical accuracy for human frailty. 
But such devices are expensive. Until The Signal 
is in unusually good financial circumstances we must 
adhere to present methods and it seems as if we were 
entitled to a little more charitable consideration than 
some of our out-of-town readers are inclined to give 



us. Surely a post-card dropped to us will insure the 
supply of a missing copy by return mail—" ask and it 
shall be given you." 



With this issue of The Sicnal the editorial staff 
as constituted for the years 1906 1907 passes out of 
existence. At such a time a sort of valedictory 
seems necessary. During the past year The Sicnal 
has been remarkably fortunate. The coming of a 
new administrative head to the college and the expo- 
sition of new plans has made it easy to fill the col 
umns of the paper. It is in the alumni department 
that an especial effort has been made and we believe 
that improvement has appeared, although there is still 
much to be desired. The Signal has been quite 
outspoken and frank in its editorials but at no time 
have they advanced beyond a conservative and rea- 
sonable stage. They have been sane and consistent, 
there is no apology to be offered for them. In con- 
clusion it is fitting that we should express our appre 
ciation to ail who have contributed to the success of 
the paper. To the alumni for news furnished about 






fc 



xas 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



123 



themselves; to the faculty, and especially President 
Butterfield, for news concerning the college and its 
departments ; to the students for their criticism and 
suggestions. Especially does the retiring editor-in- 
chief wish to thank the members of the board for 
their support and loyalty throughout the year. Under 
the direction of a new editor who has already proven 
his ability we look for a more interesting and a better 
Signal than ever before — and thus the old editorial 
board goes "on the way." 



The majority of the students were more or less 
surprised to learn in connection with the Springfield 
alumni banquet that the question of a name was still 
a point of difference between the older alumni and 
younger men connected with M. A. C. Most of us 
were inclined to suppose that the constituents of the 
words "Aggie" and "Massachusetts" had reached a 
permanent armistice in regard to these terms. And 
even now we believe that there is no need of worrying 
over this matter. For thirty years and more "Aggie" 
passed as a dignified name for the college— through 
all those crucial days it served as a cognomen by 
which the press and public generally knew the institu- 
tion. But a college, like a nation or a language, 
grows and in the course of time those most concerned 
believed that a visible change was necessary. Thus 
"Aggie" was abolished but it remains as an essential 
part of the history of the Massachusetts agricultural 
college. We no longer speak or write in the lan- 
guage of Chaucer but to say that he has not exerted 
a powerful inflence upon his successors or to declare 
that, because his diction is not in accordance with 
modern ideas, it is no longer a part of English litera- 
ture, is an absurdity. Likewise, just because 
"Aggie" is a closed book to the present students of 
Massachusetts, it does not follow that the advocates 
of the new regime repudiate the older name. Indeed 
it is not impossible to understand how, at some yet 
distant date, the existent name may be changed 
again and thus put the present undergraduates in the 
same boat as th 2 older alumni of today. Those who 
have again dug out this question might much more 
profitably employ their time elsewhere. May we not 
ask that this grim, old skeleton, the sole relic of a 
forgotten incident, be kept in the closet where it 
belongs and not be paraded before us at every ban- 
quet, after the manner of the ancient Egyptians. 



There is a certain denomination of Christians, 
whose belief runs in channels quite different from 
most people. However, there is only one particular 
which sharply segregates them irom the rest of man- 
kind and that is, to use a colloquial expression, "they 
don't believe in war." We refer of course to the 
Friends or Quakers. The columns of The College 
Sicnal are not the place for a theological discussion 
or for an ethical consideration of affairs militant ; it 
is only in connection with the department of military 
instruction that we present the question. By act of 
Congress the faculty of this and every other land- 
grant college is enjoined to require military drill of 
"every able bodied male student." Again we do not 
wish to discuss the utility or practicability of this 
edict. The Signal however believes and most 
emphatically that, if one man is forced to perform mil- 
itary stunts, then all should be required to do so. 
Military drill at M. A. C. pertains to war In name 
alone. If our nation were obliged to depend in an hour 
of need on the citizen soldiers at her agricultural col- 
leges only some divine interposition could save us 
from defeat at the hands of even a third-rate foreign 
power. Our military drill must be considered rather 
in the light of gymnasium work. Our students prac 
tice with a Krag-Jorgensen rifle instead of a bar-bell, 
in a military uniform instead of a "gym" suit. The 
Sicnal does not understand how the college authori 
ties can excuse a person from drill except as expressly 
stated in the book of rules without being guilty of rank 
discrimination. We are not aware that in the days 
of the Civil War draft the national government recog 
nized the people who had religious scruples against 
fighting. They or anyone else who did not wish to go 
to the front paid the price and staid at home. But 
at the Massachusetts agricultural college it is quite 
the reverse and many who could no more pass a 
physical examination to go into the army than they 
could fly to the moon are put to much additional 
expense and trouble and even hardship from which 
another person is excused for reasons whose ration 
ality may be questioned to say the least. Here, 
instead of paying for the privilege of exemption from 
military service as in the former incident, there are 
men in the senior class who have laid out over a half 
hundred dollars in the last four years for uniforms and 
equipment. This is merely an example of that con 



stellation of consistency jewels which shines at this 
college, has from the beginning and bids fair to con- 
tinue to do so in undiminished radiancy even unto the 
end. 

/Uhletic No-ttS- 

BASKETBALL. 

Under this heading there is a hard luck story to 
tell this week. At the last moment the authorities 
at Brown took alarm over the prevalence of scarlet 
fever in Western Massachusetts and refused to allow 
the team to play here. Then the game scheduled on 
the 25th with the University of Vermont failed to 
materialize because the Vermont people were stalled 
by a snow-drift on the electric road and spent the 
evening upon a trolley car in East Hadley instead of 
the drill hall floor. 

Thursday morning the team left on a trip to Will 
iamstown and Northern New York, a country never 
before entered by an M. A. C. athletic team. Five 
men with the manager and one substitute (Neale, 
'09) made the trip. 

Williams, 30; M. A. C, 2. 

Thursday afternoon, Feb. 28th, the team met a 
bad defeat at the hands of Williams at Williamstown, 
30 to 2. Chase, right guard, saved Massachusetts 
from being shut out by shooting a basket toward the 
close of second period. Williams's score was evenly 
divided between the two halves, six baskets from the 
floor and three from free tries being thrown in the 
first, and seven from the floor and one from a free 
try in the second. Waters was conspicuous on the 
Williams team in the score-making, nearly all of his 
five baskets being from difficult chances, while Capt. 
Tower and Templeton, who took Durfee's place at 
right forward in the second period, had three each to 
their credit. Durfee's only basket was a sensational 
one-handed toss over his head, the ball dropping 
through without touching the rim. Warren failed to 
score from the floor, but his passes from free tries 
were more accurate than in former games and result - 
ed in four points. The guarding of both teams was 
close, but Williams surpassed in passing, and the 
play was almost entirely within Massachusetts 's terri- 
tory during the whole game. The home team invari- 



ably took the ball from our players when they endeav 
ored to pass it up the floor and returned it to a point 
directly beneath their basket. It was six minutes 
after the beginning of the match before Williams 
scored the first basket. For M. A. C. Chase and 
Cobb excelled in all features. The line-up : — 



WILLIAMS. 

Warren. 1. f. 

Durfee, Templeton, r. f. 

Waters, c. 

Allen. I. g. 

Tower (capt.). r. g. 



m. a. c. 

r. g.. Chase 

I. g.. Cutter 

c, Cillett (capt ) 

r. f.. Cobb 

I. f., Burke 



Score— Williams, 30. M. A. C. 2. Goals from floor— 
Templeton 3. Durfee. Waters 5. Allen. Tower 3. Chase. 
Coals from free tries— Warren 4. Referee -Allen of North 
Adams. Timers — M. Brown of Williams and Philbrick of 
M. A C. Time — 20-minute halves. 

M. A. C, II; Alexandria Bay, 10. 

Massachusetts won from Alexandria Bay Feb. 
28th, at that place, II to 10. The college team hit 
a hot pace and played a brilliant game in passing and 
blocking. The Alexandria team played well, espec- 
ially in blocking, and scored on long shots. Cobb's 
all-around work was noticeable, while the blocking of 
Chase and Burke, and the basket-shooting of Cutter 
were all that could be desired. 

The line-up : — 



M. A. C. 

Cobb. r. f 
Burke. I. f. 
Cillett. c. 
Cutter. I. g. 
Chase, r. g. 



ALEXANDRIA BAY. 

I. g.. C. Scott 

r. g., Wachter 

c, A. Scott 

r. f.. Hough 

I. f.. Wrenn 



Score — M.A. C. II. Alexandria Bay 10. Baskets from 
floor— Cobb. Burke. Cutter. Chase. Wachter, A. Scott. 
Hough. Wrenn. Goals from fouls— Burke 2. Cobb. Wrenn. 
Wachter. Referee — Rev. Mr. Palmer. Timers — Ferry and 
Philbrick. Time of game— one hour. 

Accounts of the other games of the New York trip 
are not available at the time The Signal goes to the 
press. 



BASEBALL. 

With the close of the basketball season and the 
approach of spring our enthusiasm is turned toward 
baseball. The management knows of no better way 
to foster this enthusiasm than by presenting the 
schedule as it is at the present date, subject to sub- 
sequent changes. Of course this schedule is not 



1*4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



official as it has not been approved by the athletic 
board. 

The number of games has been somewhat Increas- 
ed this year. Amherst appears on the schedule for 
the first time in three years and Norwich university 
and Middlebury are new friends. The management 
is trying to secure two games with Bates, but as yet 
arrangements have not been made. If these games 
can be arranged one will be played here May 16th, 
and the other at Lewiston May 28th. May 30th will 
probably be closed with some semi-professional team 
in Maine. 

The prospects for a good team are bright and with 
everybody out who has any baseball ability whatever 
we should have the best one in our history. 

The schedule is as follows : — 

April 6. Holy Cross at Worcester. 

13. Holyoke League at Holyoke. 
" 16. Rhode Island at Kingston. 

" 17. Brown at Providence. 

20. Dartmouth at Hanover. 

■ 24. Amherst at Pratt Field. 

•' 27. Springfield T. S. at Springfield. 

May 4. W. P. I. at Amherst. 

8. Trinity at Hartford. 

" 11. Norwich Univ. at Amherst. 

14. Springfield T. S. at Amherst. 
18. Norwich Univ. at Northfield. 

•• 20. Middlebury at Middlebury. 

" 21. Vermont Academy at Saxtons River. 

" 26. Williams at Williamstown. 

" 27. Boston College at Boston. 

" 28. Open. 

" 29. Univ. of Maine at Orono. 

" 30. Open. 

June 3. Andover at Andover. 

4. Cushing at Ashburnham. 
" 8. Boston College at Amherst. 



Oct. 




FOOTBALL. 

At the Connecticut Valley alumni banquet held at 
Springfield. Professor Howard of the athletic board 
gave out the following schedule for the 1907 football 
season : — 

Sept. 28. Williams at Williamstown. 
Oct. 2. Brown at Providence. 

5. Rhode Island State at Amherst. 
" 12. Dartmouth at Hanover. 



Nov. 



19. 
26. 

2. 

9. 
16. 



Open for home game. 

W. P. I. at Amherst. 

Amherst at Amherst. 

Held for Tufts. 

S. T. S. at Springfield. 
Professor Howard explained at the banquet that the 
above was a playable schedule and that the team was 
out to win next fall. " Mat." Bullock who won fame 
as a Dartmouth player several years ago and who 
coached M. A. C. in 1905 will hold a similar position 
at the college this coming season. 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY BANQUET. 

The annual meeting and banquet of the Connecti- 
cut Valley Alumni association was held in Cooley's 
hotel at Springfield on Feb. 21st. There were present 
President Butterfield and Dean-elect George F. 
Mills of the college, and 38 alumni, and a most pleas- 
ant evening was spent. A feature of the banquet was 
the playing of the college orchestra and the singing of 
favorite college songs by a glee club of 12 under- 
graduates. In the business meeting the following 
officers were elected : President, Dr.W. I. Boyntonof 
Sprtngfield '92; vice-presidents, ranking in the order 
named, Register of Deeds R. W. Lyman of North- 
ampton, '71, Dr. M. H. Williams of Sunderland, 
*92. George Leonard 71, and W. P. Birnie of 
Springfield '71; secretary, H. D. Hemenway of 
Northampton, '95 ; treasurer, Dr. Harvey L. Shores 
of Northampton, '90. The executive committee 
includes the officers. It was voted to hold the next 
banquet at the Hotel Draper in Northampton, and the 
constitution was so amended as to allow of having 
four vice presidents instead of two. 

The banquet was held at 7 o'clock and and as soon 
as the business was disposed of President Boynton 
called on President Butterfield who prefaced his 
remarks with an account of the creation of the office 
of dean and the appointment of Professor Mills to the 
position. The president explained the bearing of the 
humanities upon a technical education. He then pro- 
ceeded to enumerate the recent changes which have 
been made in the departments housed in Wilder hall 
and explained the college appropriation bill which is 
now in the legislatnre. He concluded with a mention 
of the anniversaries which will take place this year 
and which The Signal has already noted. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1*5 



President Boynton at this juncture expressed the 
appreciation of the alumni of President Butterfield's 
work for the college and pledged their support of his 
plans. 

Professor Mills was the next speaker, and said that 
the whole college is awake and senses the brightness 
of future prospects. He paid high tribute to Presi- 
dent Butterfield's ability and energy, and then turned 
to outline the duties of his new position as dean. The 
dean, he said, humorously, doesn't expect to be "the 
suspender of college breeches," but will rather keep 
the college machinery oiled and running, rather try 
to reach what is deeper, more personal, more vital 
than even the education the young man is to receive 
and be the one to whom the boy in trouble or harassed 
can go to unburden himself and receive advice or 
suggestions for his future. Very eloquently and sym- 
pathetically Professor Mills voiced the earnest kindli- 
ness of heart that has earned him among the under- 
garduates the loving title. "Daddy."' He also 
touched on his future duties in reference to courses 
and classes. 

In concluding he expressed his conviction that in 
the great plans for the college adequate provision must 
oe made for teaching the things that make for a 
broader culture than is provided by the studies 
included in a mcreiy agricultural curriculum. We 
must teach our young men, said he, that there are 
things deeper, more fundamental than mere money 
and business ability if we are to see them become 
strong citizens and leaders in the community, 
rrofessor Mills' fine burst of eloquence, his earnest 
sincerity and fine personality made a deep impression 
and very spontaneous was the outburst of applause as 
he finished. 

Prof. S. F. Howard of the athletic board next 
spoke upon athletics, appealing to the alumni for funds 
and giving out considerable information concerning 
this feature which will be found in the sporting 
columns. Remarks were also made by Cyrus H. 
Hubbard of Sunderland, Dr. J. E. Root of Hartford, 
William P. Birnie, Robert W. Lyman of Northamp- 
ton, and E. G. Bartlett, '07, of the editorial staff of 
The Signal, who spoke upon the the undergraduates' 
standpoint. The evening wound up with the singing 
of "Auld Lang Syne." 




— Doctor Stone was detained at home for several 
days last week because of a severe cold. 

— J. N. Summers has been elected class orator of 
the senior class in place of W. E. Dickinson, resigned. 

— Quite a number of the alumni returned to 
Amherst last week to attend the fraternity initiation 
banquets. 

— Many of those residing in Western Massachusetts 
took advantage of Washington's birthday and went 
home for a short visit. 

— Captain Martin is recovering quite rapidly from 
his recent injury. He expects to be around college 
again in two or three weeks. 

— H. T. Wheeler, '08, spent Sunday at his home 
in Concord, incidentally participating in the town 
meeting of the following day. 

— The series of lectures upon ''Rural Sociology" 
which President Butterfield has been giving to the 
senior class ended on last Thursday. 

— Copies of the inauguration exercises held last 
October at the college have recently been distributed. 
These contain President Butterfield's inaugural speech 
in full. 

— Feb. 20th President Butterfield spoke on "The 
mission of an agricultural college" at Greenfield 
before a meeting of the Franklin and Hampshire fruit- 
growers' association. 

— At a recent class meeting the freshman elected 
the following officers : William E. Leonard, presi- 
dent ; Arthur J. Sullivan, vice-president ; Francis S. 
Beeman, secretary and treasurer; Lyman G. Scher- 
merhorn, class-captain; Albert C. Kelley, sergeant - 
at-arms. 

— The sophomore class has voted to give a recep- 
tion to the senior class at commencement. This 
event will take the place of the senior prom, of other 
days. The class of 1 909 has elected officers for the 
ensuing semester, viz : Charles H. White, president ; 
Myron W. Thompson, vice-president: George M. 
Brown, Jr.. secretary; Robert D. Lull, treasurer; 
Harold D. Crosby, class-captain ; David A. Curran, 
sergeant-at-arms; Donald J. Caffrey, historian. 



136 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



127 



— The preacher at chapel on Feb. 24th was the 
Rev. Mr. Crawford of the Amherst Methodist church. 
The speaker last Sunday was Rev. William E. Strong 
now of Boston, but until recently pastor of the First 
church in Amherst. 

At a meeting of the Phi Kappa Phi society held 
on last Thursday three men were elected to member- 
ship from the senior class, they having attained the 
requisite scholarship. These men, together with their 
marks, were W. E. Dickinson, 88 2-3 ; R. J. Watts, 
87 ; and A. W. Higgins, 85. 

— The following students representing the college 
glee club and orchestra attended the alumni banquet 
in Springfield: E. G. Bartlett, G. H. Chapman, J. 
A. Hyslop, R. H. Jackson, E. W. Bailey, Lloyd W. 
Chapman, G. H. Fulton, C. H. White, W. E. 
Adams, H. P. Crosby, Louis Brandt and Raymond 
L. Whitney. 

— The committee of the faculty which has charge 
of the library plans in the immediate future to greatly 
strengthen the institution in its collection of classical 
English works. The wisdom of this move is evident 
for the expansion of recent years has been largely 
along technical and scientific lines to the exclusion of 
straight literature. 

— The unprecedented spell of cold weather has 
resulted in much sickness around college. S. S. 
Crossman was seriously ill the first of last week, it 
being feared for a day or two that he was to develop a 
case of scarlet fever. H. E. Alley is in the Dickin- 
son hospital of Northampton, slowly recovering from 
a severe attack of rheumatism. Many minor colds 
have also been reported among the students. 



-It is probable that the entire arrangement of occasion. 



posed of pops up. This time the seat of the opposi- 
tion seems to be in Belchertown. But whatever 
the outcome, in the end, as the Amherst Record says : 
"It is another instance of the buyer, the consumer, 
being placed between the devil and the deep sea." 
— Amherst is grappling with the electric light prop- 
osition. At present there are some localities where 
one light could do the work of two or three as now 
installed. Other places are so dark as to render walk- 
ing on the sidewalk dangerous. One of the latter of 
especial interest to M. A. C. people is on Pleasant 
street near Mr. Canavan's. An incandescent light 
should be placed here as a deep ditch runs beside the 
sidewalk and the nearest arc lights are a long distance 
away. 

— A change is suggested in the cover of the Index 
hereafter. The idea is to adopt a uniform design and 
style of binding for a standard from which no class 
shall deviate. The Signal does not believe that there 
is any body of students which has the authority to 
dictate such a change and moreover the plan would 
seem to take much of the individual merit from the 
different editions of the annual which appear. It 
would be interesting to hear from the alumni upon this 
matter. 

— President Butterfield is a prime mover in the 
effort which is being made to establish a club in 
Boston composed of Michigan agricultural college 
men now in New England. A surprisingly large num- 
of the prominent agriculturists and allied workers of 
this section are graduates of the Wolverine college. 
They will meet next Friday night at the American 
house in Boston for organization. President Butter- 
field Is a member of the reception committee for that 



commencement next June will be changed. It is 
planned to extend the festivities over a longer period 
of time, to introduce new features which have 
developed in the last few years around college and 
especially to devote more time and attention than 
usual to the alumni. The latter body intends to take 
especial notice of the close of the college's thirty- 
ninth year of existence. 

— The college having just made a satisfactory 
arrangement in regard to the sale of farm and green- 
house produce in markets away from the local com- 
petition, the question of where the milk should be dis- 



— At a meeting of the executive committee of the 
M. A. C. alumni association, held in Amherst Feb. 
16th, it was voted to engage the services of Edwin B. 
Child, a well-known artist of New York city, to paint 
an oil portrait of the late President H. H. Goodeli, 
which will be presented to the college at commece- 
ment in June on behalf of the alumni. Mr. Child is 
a graduate of Amherst college in the class of '90, the 
son of Rev. J. B. Child, a former pastor of the 
Baptist church in Amherst and superintendent of 
schools. He was well acquainted with the late Presi 
dent Goodeli. 



— The short course "commencement" will occur 
this year on March 12th. The usual program will be 
followed of holding a farmers' institute in the chapel, 
in which work the Hampshire Agricultural society will 
assist. In connection with the institute a practical 
demonstration in the use of separators, Babcock test- 
ers and churns will be made by the students of the 
short winter course in dairy farming. These exercises 
will begin at 10 o'clock. It is expected that the 
speaker of the forenoon will be Dr. Clinton, director 
of the Storrs agricultural experiment station of Con- 
necticut. The speaker of the afternoon will be Dr. 
M. Twichell of Augusta, Me. Dinner can be 
secured at the college dining hall. 

THE NEW SIGNAL EDITORS. 

After being tested for a year the plan of having the 
different classes elect their own representatives to the 
editorial staff of The Signal has been discontinued by 
a vote of the board and a return has been made to 
the old system wnereoy all new men are appointed by 
the senior members. This move has only been made 
after a careful consideration of the question. It is 
believed that the seniors on the board are more capa- 
ble of making a satisfactory choice than a whole class 
which can manifestly have no opportunity to investi- 
gate the work submitted in qualification by the various 
candidates and which is also more apt to be swayed 
oy popular prejudices than by real merit. Again the 
seniors are able to appreciate most keenly the needs 
of the paper in its various departments and to act 
thereon. In accordance with the unanimous vote of 
the board the students representing the class of 1907 
met on March 1st and elected the following new 
members: — 1908. Hermon T. Wheeler and Orton 
L Clark; 1909. Charles H. White. George M. 
Brown, Jr., and Theodore Cronyn ; 1910, Walter R. 
Clarke and Edward F. Damon. At a meeting of the 
new board, D. P. Miller was elected editor-in-chief, 
R. H. Verbeck, business manager and O. B. Briggs 
assistant business manager. 



ASSEMBLY NOTES. 

The assembly held on Feb. 19th was addressed by 
J. E. Gifford. '94, of Sutton. Mass. Mr. Gifford is 
an official of the State Grange. Recounting at some 
iength his experiences as football and military captain 



while a student he proceeded to relate several anec- 
dotes of college days and then outlined the attitude 
and work which a graduate of M. A. C. located in a 
country town should take up. He also showed in his 
talk that country politics are often as corrupt as those 
in the city and he indulged in a few personal remin- 
iscenses of a great contest waged by himself against 
the liquor interests for a position on the school board 
of Sutton. Mr. Gifford is an earnest and thoughtful 
speaker and an excellent representative of our alumni. 
The speaker last week was W. A. Burnett of 
Amherst who read Booth Tarkington's "M'sieur 
Beaucaire." The entertainment was by far the most 
interesting of the series and the reader held the atten- 
tion of his audience for an hour and three-quarters by 
his fine impersonations of the expatriated French 
nobleman. Hon. Carroll D. Wright, president of 
Clark college, ex-U. S. commissioner of labor and a 
trustee of the college, was to have spoken on this 
date upon the subject : "Is there any solution of the 
labor problem?" About a week before, Mr. Wright 
met with a serious accident which postponed his 
appearance until a later date. 



PROFESSOR CANNING LEAVES. 

Francis Canning, for several years instructor in 
floriculture at M. A. C, left this week for Altoona, 
Pa., where he has accepted a lucrative position as 
superintendent of a large estate. To the students of 
the college and especially those who have had the 
advantage of personally meeting Mr. Canning in the 
class-room and laboratory the loss of his experinced 
teaching and his kindly nature will be great. Fort- 
unate indeed will be the man who can even approxi 
mately secure the regard of the undergraduates as 
did Mr. Canning. The Signal wishes him the best 
of succession in his new position. 



MUSICAL CLUB CONCERT. 

The Musical Association of M. A. C. will give their 
annual concert in the college chapel Friday evening, 
March 8th. The different clubs of the organization 
are in better condition than they were last year, and 
give promise of presenting a concert of very high 
grade. Everyone Interested in the welfare of the 
college should be present and support the musical 
clubs. 



1 



138 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



lag 



THE LEGISLATIVE HEARING. 

The legislative news letter of the Springfield 
Republican contains the following under the date of 
Feb. 19: 

"The agricultural college was the center of a long 
hearing this forenoon, and the best known agricul- 
turists of the state were present in a long row to 
testify to their appreciation of the good work of the 
college and to its rapid advancement in service to the 
public. Ex-Senator Charles A. Gleason of Springfeld 
conducted the hearing and President Butterfield of 
the college was the principal speaker. Two bills were 
heard, one appropriating $7000 for giving better theo- 
retical and practical education, one for $73,000 for 
improvements in the buildings and equipments, includ- 
ing $25,000 for Clark hall and $22,000 for a new 
greenhouse. Professor Brooks explained in detail 
what was proposed for the dairy building, and there 
developed much interest in the competition of the 
college with other milk producers. Professor Brooks 
told of the new arrangement which had been made to 
prevent competition of any sort with the farmers of 
the locality, and most of the committee seemed to 
be satisfied. There was also questioning about the 
professions which are followed by the students after 
graduation, and the professors and Trustee Dickinson 
reassured the doubts of the committee on that point, 
showing that a majority of the students stick to agri- 
cultural matters, and that the college has benefitted 
the state far more in cash than it ever cost. Profes- 
sor Stone explained the item of $25,000 for Clark 
hall, and Professsor Waugh told in detail of the need 
of a greenhouse. Trustee Dickinson was eloquent 
over the new opportunity now offered for forward 
movement. Ex-Senator Merrick Morse of Belcher- 
town strenuously but briefly opposed competition in 
milk, saying that the college ought to raise first 
class blooded stock and show the farmers how to 
make the best milk, and that the people had been 
scared so much by bacteria talk from the college and 
scientific men that the sale was reduced — all of which 
Trusteee George H. Ellis, a great milk producer, 
denied." 



5emin&rs. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 
Tuesday evening, Feb. 26th, Prof. J. W. Sanborn 
of New Hampshire spoke before the Stockbridge club 



in the chapel auditorium. A brief outline of the 
progress of agriculture both in the New England states 
and the Western states and territories was given. 
Professor Sanborn then went on to tell about his own 
farming. He has about nineteen hundred acres of 
land up in the New Hampshire hills. Of this amount 
nine hundred acres are taken up by the farm proper 
while the other thousand are in pasturage. Professor 
Sanborn's faith in our New England soil is unbounded 
and he believes that any man who is willing to work 
and willing to put his capital into a farm and keep H 
there, will get the interest on his money many times. 
The farmer of today has no trust in his land. If he 
manages to save a little money he immediately look< 
around for some investment that will pay three or 
four per cent interest. And thus he shows his dis- 
trust of the soil and dees not see that by investing his 
money in better tools and equipment, more fertilizers, 
blooded live-stock, etc. , his returns will be far 
greater. Professor Sanborn practices an eight year's 
rotation on his farm as follows :— First year, ensilage 
corn; second year, peas and beans; third, clover 
fourth, potatoes; fifth, Hungarian; sixth, timothy 
seventh. Hungarian; and the eighth year it is used as 
pasture. His pasture lands have fertilizers broad- 
casted over them every spring and the benefit is 
shown by the increased milk production. There is a 
reservoir of forty acres on the farm and this is used tc 
irrigate some eighty acres of grass land, the largest 
irrigated plot, it is believed, this side of the Mississippi 
Land that twelve years ago was producing only one 
hundred and twelve tons of hay is now giving a yield 
of eight hundred tons, which shows a decided increase 
in the crop. In the twelve years during which Mr. 
Sanborn has run the farm he has paid out $ 1 30,000 
and the farm has returned every cent of the sum in 
the value of its products. And, besides, there is the 
farm and its improvements, and with the soil in such 
conditions, so he states, that, without further expense 
for fertilizers, crops to the value of $25,000 could be 
produced before the soil was exhausted. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Mr. Bardwell of the Northampton Y. M. C. A 
was the speaker Thursday evening, Feb. 21st. He 
is a graduate of Alleghany college in Pennsylvania ana 
can pretty thoroughly understand the ins and outs o! 
of student life. He spoke of the need of good, clean. 



young men to help build up our nation today. He 
went on to show how Rome fell when her peopie 
became profligate and sensuous and nothing remained 
either physical or moral, to sustain her ancient prestige ; 
for the same reason Greece with her long record of 
famous warriors, statesmen. philosophers, and 
scholars, declined and fell when the stamina of the 
race had degenerated. And so has history repeated 
itself throughout the ages. Should we not take 
warning and strive to lead noble, manly lives in the 
service of our God and country? 

Wednesday evening, Feb. 27th. Mr. Hodge of the 
International Y. M. C. A. gave an illustrated lecture 
on Y. M. C. A. extension work. Slides of typical 
association buildings scattered all over the country 
were shown and a few of the hundreds of evening school 
classes were pictured. The Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association is doing a great work in our cities. 
Hundreds and hundreds of boys and young men, who 
have not had the opportunities of a public school edu- 
cation, are studying in evening schools of the associa- 
tion and as many more are learning how to draft, how 
to become carpenters, chemists, engineers, and crafts- 
men of every description in the Y. M. C. A. work- 
shops. There are libraries, railroad circulating 
libraries, army-post libraries, and sailor libraries, 
which do a world of good ; there are reading rooms, 
club rooms, recreation rooms, and gymnasia to draw 
the men and boys off the streets where temptation 
and dishonor lurk. In short the beneficence of the 
organization is unlimited and it should receive the 
hearty support of every loyal American citizen, irre 
spective of creed or denomination. 




HORTICULTURE. 
This department has been placed in general charge 
of the competition for a prize in arboriculture. The 
Bay State agricultural society offers a prize of $25.00 
to be know as the J. W. D. French prize in arbori- 
culture to be open to the students of Massachusetts 
agricultural college for the year of 1907. The prize 
will be given for the best essay upon the following 
subject: "The Street Trees of Amherst." The 
subject was purposely chosen because of the latitude 



of treatment which it allows. All essays to com- 
pete for the prize must be in the hands of Professor 
Waugh by May 13. For further particulars the stu 
dents should make inquiries of Professor Waugh. 

One of the most recent as well as one of the most 
interesting additions to the equipment of the landscape 
gardening department is a collection of 100 photo 
gravure reproductions of the paintings of Corot. 
Corot was one of the most effective painters of land 
scape that ever lived, being especially successful in 
the painting of trees. His works show very fully how 
the beauties of landscape look to an artist, and also 
what the artist considers good composition. They 
will work in very nicely with the work of the landscape 
gardening students. Professor Waugn is going to 
arrange an exhibition of these photogravures in the 
near future in connection with senior class room 
work. 

FLORICULTURE. 

G. A. Bishop of Waltham, has been appointed 
instructor pro tern in floriculture to fill out the current 
semester in place of Francis Canning who leaves this 
week to take charge of an estate in Altoona, Pa. 
Mr. Bishop has had a thorough training in various 
lines of agriculture, horticulture and gardening in the 
English way. His garden education began in 1873 
when he went to Bylaugh Park, Norfolk as German 
gardener. He remained at this place for seven years 
and at the time of leaving was foreman of all the 
glass houses there. For some time he was connected 
with the famous Veltch nurseries of England. For 
two years he was foreman in the fruit house and gar 
dens at Halton House, Tring. He was then three 
years foreman at Basing Park, Hampshire; then two 
years foreman at Hopwood Hall, Lancashire; then 
three years head gardener and resident manager at 
Tne Grove, Teddington ; then for eight years head 
gardener and steward at Wightwick Manor. In 1893 
he was appointed head of the department of experi- 
mental agriculture in the Bermudas which position 
he held until the spring of 1905. During 1905 and 
1906 he was engaged in commercial horticultural 
enterprises on his own account in the Bermudas, 
coming to Massachusetts to make his home in the 
fall of 1906. 



»30 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»3i 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 
The Bureau of Entomology of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with the 
Massachusetts agricultural experiment station is 
about to begin an investigation of the disease preva- 
lent among bees. 

Professor Brooks, director of the Massachusetts 
experiment station, delivered an address before the 
Buckland Farmer's club on Feb. 26. his subject 
being "What the Experiment Station is doing for 
the Farmers." The meeting was large and enthu- 
siastic, and Prof. Brooks's remarks were well 
appreciated. 

The experiment station has procured an Elliott 
addressing machine which will be a great labor saving 
device in the future work of the station in sending 
out publications. At present the mailing list of the 
station is being entirely revised,— an operation which 
is requiring a great deal of time and correspondence, 
and after the revised list has been completed the 
stencils for the addressing micnine will be procured. 
Two more bulletins, Numbers 115 and 116. have 
been prepared by the Exoeriment station and will 
soon be in readiness to send out. Bulletin I 15 is 
entitled "Cranberry Insects." and was prepared by 
Mr. Franklin, the subject matter being based upon 
his work on cranberry insects last summer at Ware- 
ham. The station is in correspondence with the 
assessors of all towns in Massachusetts which are 
known to produce cranberries, the object being to 
secure the names of all cranberry growers in Massa- 
chusetts, to whom copies of the bulletin will be sent. 

Bulletin 1 16 of the Massachusetts agricultural 
experiment station which has just been issued, is on 
the San Jose Scale and experiments for its control. 
This bulletin describes the life history and appear- 
ance of the scale, lists its food plants and speaks of 
its enemies. Under the topic of treatment, fumi- 
gation and spraying are discussed, the latter at con- 
siderable length, taking up the experiments which 
have been conducted by the Station both from the 
experimental and chemical standpoints. The results 
of trials of the self boiling wash and of the K-L. 
mixture are given, together with a summary of 500 
experiments with different methods of treatment for 
this insect in the United States. Other topics 



included are "How to make the lime-sulfur," "How 
to spray for the scale." "When to spray," and "Sum- 
mer treatment." together with a summary of the 

paper. 



Alumni. 



The annual meeting of the Massachusetts agricul 
tural college local alumni association will be held in 
the College Dining Hall at Amherst on Monday, 
March 1 1 , at 6-30 p. m. Supper at 7 o'clock, sharp. 
Tickets $1.50. Any alumnus or former student is 
welcome. A special car will run to Northampton to 
connect with the 11-50 train to Springfield. Presi- 
dent Butterfield. Professor Brooks and others will 

speak. 

A. C. Monahan. Secretary. 

It is hoped to have as many trustees and others 
present as possible, by holding the meeting on the 
evening before the short course graduation. 

There has recently been formed in Connecticut an 
association of the managers of private and public 
estates, which is called the Farm Superintendents* 
club. Besides a president, the following officers 
have been sleeted : Vice-president, W. M. Shepard- 
son, '88; secretary and treasurer, A. B. Cook. '96 ; 
directors. J. H. Putnam, '94 and C. S. Phelps, '85. 
'95. The Washington Herald for Feb. 1 1 con- 
tains an interesting account of the work of Clarence 
B. Lane on the milking machine, which is entitled 
" Good-By, Pretty Milk Maid" \ 

"C. B. Lane, assistant chief oi the dairy division 
of the Department of Agriculture, has made a study 
of the practical value of milking machines, and has 
reached some marvelous conclusions. Mr. Lane is 
an expert in dairy science, and what he doesn't know 
about cows and milkmaids isn't worth knowing. He 
says his investigations have been too limited to justify 
any sweeping deductions or positive conclusions, but 
in view of the probable general introduction of such 
machinery in the near future, he believes that the 
results of his work are of sufficient value to justify 
publication." 

•• -The scarcity of milkers and the unreliability of 
many of them,' says Mr. Lane, 'has had a tendency 
to keep many men from going into dairy farming. 



Seme dairymen have been obliged to give up for this 
reason. Great interest, therefore centers around the 
milking machine. With the introduction of the 
milking machine only about one-half the labor will be 
required to milk the cows. It is believed the advent 
of the milking machine will encourage farmers to 
enlarge their plants and to make dairying their chief 
business. Where milking machines have been 
introduced they have influenced dairymen to clean up 
their barns and take more pride in their work.' " 

The above is based upon a bulletin entitled "The 
Milking Machine as a Factor in Dairying," which is 
a very thorough and practical report, and is well 
illustrated. 

'00. — Dr. A. A. Harmon was detailed by the gov- 
ernment for work in New Mexico and Arizona during 
the past summer. 

'00. —James F. Lewis, East Bridgewater, with the 
Carver Cotton Gin works. 

'01. — During the past summer a very direct as 
well as practical method of reaching and helping the 
farmers of Macon and adjoining counties of Alabama 
was carried out by the agricultural department of 
Tuskegee. An agricultural wagon was sent through 
the farming districts, from this wagon demonstrations 
of the value and use of dairy and other farm machin- 
ery were given, much practical good being accom- 
plished. Funds for the work were provided by Morris 
K. Jessup of New York, and the work of demonstra- 
tion was in charge of George R.Bridgeforth, M. A. C, 
1901, of the Tuskegee agricultural department. 

'01. — James H. Chickering of Dover, who has 
recently served as master of the local grange, is 
also serving his townsmen as a member of the board 
of selectmen, as well as in other capacities. He is 
evidently not afraid to grapple with the "rural prob- 
lem," and we trust that his efforts may be as success- 
ful as when he helped to uphold the honor of Massa- 
chusetts on the gridiron. 

'01. — Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Cooke recently wel- 
comed a baby girl to their home. Mr. Cooke is 
teaching mathematics in the Pittsfield high school. 

'04. — R. R. Raymoth. Yazoo City, Miss. 

Ex-'07. — On Dec. 21, Jesse G. Curtis of New 
York and Miss Naeta Lundy of Toronto, Canada were 



Geo. F.Vester.Jr 



TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 






485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

UM 

DyingiCUaningi Pressings and Repairing. 

A II nnlt'M promptly atteii'li-.l to 

Drop MM a porttal hixI I will rail on 3011 

X9~Y\i\\ I>re»8 8ulti to r.-nt. «#-stucl*oit*' < lothra boogat, 

11 Amity Street, A mHBM T, Mam. 

CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of \V(K)lens for thin season inelmlcs the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most .stylish and 
best in the market. 

NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



"32 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



married at Irvington-on-the-Hudson, N. Y. The 
two young people first met nine years ago when Mr. 
Curtis and his father were traveling in Canada. The 
South Framingham News says : " It was a case of 
love at first sight and three days later when Jesse 
took his departure each had promised to wait and 
remain true. This they did and when they met last 
December in New York city where the young lady 
had gone to study music, Cupid was there too." 
The marriage was kept secret for nearly two months 
and was generally known about college only when Mr. 
and Mrs. Curtis came to the junior prom. They 
expect to live for the present in New York city where 
Mr. Curtis is in the employ of the Munson-Whitaker 
company. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, I THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



HOLYOKE, MASS 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dintu'rs with 

music. 

FINK CAFK OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and ClaBS Dinners. 

010. H. HOWKElt & CO. 



lnt*rcoll*£i&"te. 



The following from the Springfield Republican will 
be of interest to M. A. C. students . 

The Peabody museum at Yale is soon to place on 
exhibition a series of fossils upon which Professor 
Lull has been at work for several months. They rep 
resent a series of the changes in the evolution of 
the horse covering six geological periods and tracing 
the animal from the period when it was a foot high up 
to the present horse, these changes being indicated 
by the head, teeth and feet, the latter originally show- 
ing a three and four-toed horse. The collection was 
originally made by Prof. 0. C. Marsh, who showed it 
to the late Professor Huxley when he came to lecture 
in America 30 years ago, and who as a result of his 
investigation changed his opinion as to the origin of 
the horse from Europe to America. The series 
include nearly 100 specimens. 



THE FAMOUS KOSTENB&DER. 

Mast Attractive Cafe in New England. 

Private Dining Rooms for Lailie* and Theatre PartieB. 

Class and Fraternity Banquets a specialty. 

Try our Special Sunday Diuners, 1 1\ m. to 8.30 v. M., 50< 

Whin in towu give us a trial and oe couvinced. 

Open until midnight. 

EDWARD A. LKWIS, Manager. 

If.14 Suffolk St., - - HuLYOKK, MA>S. 

Telephone connection. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUpto-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams. Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BKST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

I). II. KENDHICK, Proprietor. 



COULK«)v CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

M Main Stkkkt, - - - NORTHAMPTON 

Everythinu cooked to order. 

C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



RaDar's 3nn t 

Olil South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON. M AS* 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beantifnl Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB. DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLAC E TO PDH III THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 20, 1907 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni .re requested to contribute Communications should b. addressed. College S.okal. Amhmst. Mass. Th« S.onal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discont.nuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not recei»e their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. _ — — — — — "" 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER, 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK, 1908, Business Manager. 

O. B. BRICGS. 1909, Assistant Business Manager. 
O. B. BRICGS. 1909. Alumni Notes. O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. 

H T WHEELER 1908, College Notes. J- R- PARKER. 1908, Athletics. 

THEO. CRONYN. 1909. Seminars. C H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 

W.R.CLARK. 1910. E. D. DAMON, 1910. 

J. M. BROWN. 1909. Intercollegiate. 



Terms. »LOO per tjesr in sdesnes. Sisgls Copies, 10c. Postage outside el Units*. Stat— snd Cnnnda. tic. s_tra. 



Y. M. C A. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Reading- Room Association. 
Basket-ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



C. H. White. Pres. 

K. E. Glllett. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

J. N. Summers. Sec. 

E. D. Phiibrick. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

BaseB-ll Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Se<- 
T. A. Barry, Manager • 
K. E. Glllett. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Poet Office at Amherst. 



Ed i-tb rials. 



The new Sicnal board has taken up its work with 
this issue. The first duty is to the retiring seniors 
who have for the past year labored so faithfully for 
The Signal, and through its columns for M. A. C. 
We will not say that no mistakes have been made. 
We can only hope that the new board of editors will 
make as few mistakes, and will profit as well by them. 
Mr. King, as editor-in-chief, has labored incessantly 
to keep up the standard of the paper, often doing the 
work which was properly that of three or four associ- 
ate editors. He has strictly maintained a high liter- 
ary standard, following accurately and well the trend 
of college events, fully justifying The Signal in its 
claim to be a college newspaper. Mr. Watts, as 
business manager, has also done his work well,— in 
fact we may say better than any other business man- 
ager which The Signal has ever had. The credit 
side of his accounts shows a substantial balance, with 
which he proposes to present the Y. M. C. A. with a 



piano. The gift is an admirable one, and the spirit 
which promotes it is no less admirable and generous. 
Mr. Watts began his work as business manager when 
only assistant manager, at a tim^ when the '06 busi- 
ness manager was so engrossed with other duties that 
he could not possibly tend to his Signal duties. Mr. 
Watts found the accounts in poor shape, and no other 
evidence of his business ability is needed than the fact 
that the books now show a substantial balance in the 
credit column. As for the other retiring members of 
the 1906-1907 Signal board, their work has also 
been worthy the trust placed in them. 

The next duty of the new board of editors is to 
state its policy. The standard of the Signal as a rep- 
resentative college newspaper will be maintained as in 
the past few years. It will endeavor to express col- 
lege sentiment, not only from the student standpoint, 
but from the standpoint of faculty, alumni and friends 
of the college as well. It would be vicious to the 
best interests of the college to confine ourselves to the 
oftentimes narrow and prejudiced point of view of the 
student body. We esteem our college for its democ- 



134 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'35 



racy and the value it places upon individual worth. 
Yet there is a tendency for this democratic spirit to 
pass beyond its legitimate bounds and become cyn- 
ical and pessimistic. The most ''democratic" men 
in college often become the worst kickers, and 99fc of 
the kicking which men indulge in isn't worth the 
breath wasted upon it. And in the past this warped 
sentiment of the few has too often found vent in the 
editorial columns of The Signal. The amount of 
harm which may be done in this way through the 
speaking organ of the college places a grave responsi- 
bility upon the editorial pen. A recent article in this 
column advanced the idea that students of Massa- 
chusetts agricultural college feel that the "agricul- 
tural" phase of the college is made too much of. 
The falsity of the assertion was immediately made 
evident by the disapproval of the student body. But 
meanwhile the erroneous impression had been con- 
veyed far and near, papers took it up and the query 
everywhere was "What is the matter with the stu- 
dents at M. A. C?" This little example is not 
quoted at this time to keep a dead and purposeless 
question alive, but merely as an example of the sort 
of thing which the present editorial board intends to 
avoid. An editorial is worthless unless it does some 
good, — some general good, — to the college, and the 
editor intends to make that the measure of his work 
for the next year. It is not his intention to work 
independently, but cooperatively. 

The editor has been requested by several students 
to express the dissatisfaction which a certain editorial 
in the last Signal concerning "affairs militant" has 
caused in the student body. It is rather doubtful 
whether the article referred to did any great amount 
of good, and the general sentiment is that a great 
wrong has been done one whose conduct has always 
been unimpeachable and who has commanded the 
the universal respect of those who really know him 
and the good work he has done. 

The editor has been obliged to use the shears pretty 
freely this week in order to make room for the 
accounts of various unaccustomed happenings around 
college during the last week. This "clipping" has 
been almost disastrous to the appearance of many of 
the regular columns. 

Mr. Francis Canning, as he was leaving for Penn- 
sylvania, requested that The Signal express through 



its columns the appreciation which he feels for the 
kindly sentiment of the members of the senior and 
juuior classes in floriculture which prompted them to 
remember him upon his departure by the little gifts 
which they presented to him. The sentfment was 
indeed nobly expressed and is merely indicative of 
the well wishes of the whole college for Mr. Canning 
in his new work. 

Athletic No-tts- 

BASKETBALL. 

In reviewing the recent basketball season one can- 
not but agree that it was a success. The schedule 
included games with the foremost college teams of 
New England. In years past, basketball was looked 
upon by our college as a secondary sport and the 
schedules were correspondingly with second rate teams 
for the most part. This year the manager received 
the heartiest support from the student body and suc- 
ceeded in part in placing basketball on the same plane 
as football and baseball. The trips were more 
extensive the team covering nearly 2000 miles during 
the season. The character of the games played in 
Amherst, or scheduled at least, gave the students more 
of an opportunity to see their team in action than ever 
before. 

Basketball is a game that demonstrates the fact 
that a home team has an advantage over a visiting 
team. That our team went through the season with- 
out a defeat on its own floor while on other floors it 
won but two games illustrates this point to advantage. 
But considering the character of the teams played our 
five certainly did more than satisfactory work this 
season. 

The basketball season came to a close March 2 
when the team went down to defeat by St. Lawrence 
university at Canton, N. Y. by the score of 16-6. 
The officials of the game were rather unsatisfactory. 
The home team scored 10 of its points on free tries 
for the basket. 

On March 1 the team lost an exciting game at 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. by the same score as that of the 
St. Lawrence game. Our team led at the end of the 
first half with a score of 6-5 but failed to add anything 
in the second half. A large crowd witnessed the 
game. 



Sophomore-Freshmen Game. 
In a game marked by hard and close covering but 
free from "dirty work" the sophomores defeated the 
freshmen, March 7, by a score of 24-10. The first 
few moments of play were very close. Burke scored 
the first basket two minutes after the first toss up. It 
was five minutes more before another score came. 
This time it was Leonard who dropped one in for the 
freshmen. During this time the ball was continually 
under the sophomores' basket and it was only by the 
closest kind of covering that that the freshmen were 
kept from running up a score. The sophomores now 
"got going" and Burke, Willis and Neale, shot the 
ball through the basket in rapid snccession. 
Schermerhorn added one more for the freshmen 
towards the end of the half. The half ended with 
both sides pretty much all in. 

In the second half the freshmen took out Schermer- 
horn, who had been suffering from the grip, and put 
in at center Woodward, filling his position at left for- 
ward with Smith. The sophomores still maintained 
their lead, and by superior team work and a good eye 
for the basket made 10 more points to the freshmen's 
6. During the last two minutes of play the sopho- 
mores put in Turner at right guard in place of Noble. 
Fo 1, the sophomores Burke and Neale excelled, while 
for the freshmen Leonard and Woodward played the 
best game. The freshmen's team work and shooting 
were poor compared with the consistent passing and 
shooting of the sophomores. 
The line-up : — 

SOPHOMORES. FRESHMEN. 

Alger. I. f. , r - 8 V Chase 

Burke, r.f. L <• I» W » ldron 

Neale, c c. Schermerhorn. Woodward 

Willis i « r. f.. Woodward. Smith 

Noble, r. g. 1- f - Leonard 

Score — Sophomores 24. freshm-n 10. Goals from floor- 
Burke 6. Neale 5. Leonard 2, Willis. Schermerhorn. Wood- 
ward. Referee— Cobb. 1908. Attendance— 30O. 



Manager Barry has secured the service of Brecken- 
bridge, the Amherst baseball coach, for two days a 
week. With this help and with the majority of posi- 
tions held down by veterans players we expect to have 
the fastest team the college has ever had. 

Several changes have been made in the schedule. 
The game with Vermont academy has been cancelled. 
Two games will be played at Burlington with the Uni- 
versity of Vermont on May 16 and 17 respectively. 
The game with Springfeld Training school on May 14 
has been changed to May 22. 

It may be of Interest to the "faithful" to know the 
new rules for 1907. Here they are :— 

If any player other than the pitcher soils a new ball, 
either by moistening it or rubbing in the dirt, he will 
be fined $5. 

If a pitched ball strikes the ground before it crosses 
the plate it counts as a ball in every case. 

The batsman will be declared out if he changes 
from one box to the other after the pitcher has taken 
the pitcher's box. 

In games where two umpires officiate it shall be 
agreed on and announced before the game on which 
particular plays each shall rule. 

If a catcher interferes with a batsman while striking 
at a pitched ball, the batsman becomes a base runner. 
If there are two base runners and one passes another 
in an endeavor to make a run while the first base run- 
ner is being "tagged" the base runner who passes 
shall be declared out. 



BASEBALL. 

The baseball men have been called out and are 
practicing daily in the drill hall. Twenty-six man 
answered to the first call including six of last year's 
regular players. Promising freshmen candidates are 
E. H. Brown, L. C. Brown, Blaney, Woodward and 
Partridge. 



MUSICAL. 

The first concert of the college year was rendered 
in the Stone Chapel Friday, March 8th, under the 
auspices of the M. A. C. Musical association. The 
latter is comprised of an Orchestra, Mandolin and 

Glee club. 

The Chapel was tastefully decorated with plants 
from the college plant-house. There was a large 
audience present made up largely of students and 
townspeople and their appreciation of the music was 
attested by a hearty applause after each selection. 
In no case was a club allowed to leave the platform 
without an encore. It is said that a musical critic 
from Boston was present at the concert and com- 
mented favorably upon the success of the entertain- 




t36 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»37 



ment. The leaders and members of the clubs have 
reason to feel encouraged and should keep up the good 
work which they have so successfully started. 



Colleg? Notts - 



cultural college was represented by President Butter- 
field and Professor Brooks, and among those present 
were Elmer D. Howe, '81, S. L. Hills, '81, and 
H. S. Wheeler, '83. 



— The 1908 Index will appear in a few days, it is 
hoped before the Easter Recess. 

— The Sunday chapel services on March 17 were 
conducted Rev. C. E. Holms of Northampton. 

— Sunday chapel on March 10 was conducted by 
Wellington H. Tinker, secretary of the Student's 
league of New York City. 

— The Easter Recess is scheduled to begin March 
27 and end April 3 at 8 a. m. A petition has been 
circulated by the students asking for March 25 
and 26. 

— Dr. David Sprague of Grace Church, Amherst, 
has been conducting chapel exercises for the past few 
days, speaking upon proper observence of Lent, and 
its place in the religious life. 

— Mr. Watts, as business manager of the Signal, 
presented each member of the retiring board of editors 
with a nicely framed photograph of the Signal Board 
as it was comprized for the year 1906-1907. 

— A first prize of $25 and a second prize of $15 
are offered by a friend of the college for the best es- 
say on "The origin, prevention and extinguishment of 
fires on farm wood-lots." The competition will close 
May 10. 

— Lack of space prohibits the printing of accounts 
of the "Farmer's Institute" and "Short Course 
Graduation" which took place on the afternoon and 
evening of March 12. These functions were fully 
covered in the Republican of the next day by a repre- 
sentative of the student body. 

— On Friday, March 8, there was held at the 
State House in Boston a meeting designated by the 
name of the "New England Conference on Rural 
Progress." The men in conference represented the 
agricultural colleges and experiment stations, the state 
granges, societies for promoting agriculture, and va- 
rious rural betterment societies of the New England 
states. The conference was made possible by the 
efforts of President Butterfield. Massachusetts agri- 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

An informal dance was held in the Drill-hall on the 
afternoon and evening of March 16. The dance was 
planned, as usual, to begin at 4-30, but delays on 
both the Northampton and Holyoke car-lines put off 
the opening numbers until about an hour later. 
Meanwhile, however, the orchestra played five extras 
for those who were so fortunate as to get there on 
time. The principle delay was in the party of 
eighteen couple which came over from Mount Hol- 
yoke college and which was detained for nearly three- 
quarters of an hour at the "Notch." After the 
arrival of this party the regular program was begun, 
but being so late it was found necessary to cut short 
each number and particularly the pause between 
numbers. The hall was prettily decorated with ban- 
ners and pennants of Massachusetts and the various 
institutions represented by the gentlemen's fair part- 
ners. In the southeast corner of the hall was placed 
the patronesses' stand ; the orchestra was placed in 
the middle of the floor. Plants from the Durfee 
plant-house were used freely in the decorations, mak- 
ing a very pretty display of dracaena palms as a back- 
ground, marguerites, camelias, aspidiotras, maran 
tas, cinerarias, box trees, etc., filling up the bare 
corners and softening the sharp angles. On either 
side, about three-quarters of the way down the hall, 
the full bare sweep of the floor was broken with juts 
of these decorative plants, allowing, however, pas- 
sage-ways to the portion of the floor beyond. The 
lunch at intermission was served at Draper hall, 
owing to the more favorable weather conditions. The 
tables were decorated with primroses in various colors 
and varieties. After the lunch, which was served by 
Mrs. Rowe, the couples returned to the Drill-hall, 
where the rest of the program was played, seemingly 
all too soon. The dance came to a close at about 
9-15, some of the parties returning in special cars to 
their destinations. Among the students present were : 
K. E. Gillett, J. R. Parker, E. H. Shaw, C. B. 
Thompson, F. C. Peters, M. H. Clark, F. A. Cutler, 
G. H. Chapman, C. S. Gillett, F. E. Edwards, L. 



K. Liang, F. E. Thurston, L. D. Larsen, C. L. 
Flint, S. J. Wright, A. J. Anderson, H. K. Hayes, 
W. S. Rrrgan, E. D. Philbrick, D. P. Miller, W. E. 
Adams, Theo. Cronyn, R. Potter, L. S. Corbctt, M. 
W. Thompson, R. D. Lull, E. H. Brown, L. C. 
Brown, Allen, '10, Bigelow, Whitney, McGraw, 
Waldron, Biancy, Call, W. E. Leonard, Smith, 
Annis, Dickinson, '10, S. C. Brooks, Roy 
Gaskill, E. F. Gaskill, '06, R. D. Whitmarsh, E. S. 
Fulton, '04, C. B. Stocking of Williams college, C. 
A. A. Rice, ex- '07, of Dartmouth. 



LOCAL ALUMNI BANQNET. 

The Massachusetts agricultural college local alumni 
association met and banqueted at Draper hall on the 
evening of March 11. At a short business meeting 
held before the banquet, the following officers for the 
ensuing year were elected : President, R. W. Lyman, 
71 ; first vice-president, David Barry, '90; second 
vice-president, C. W. Ciapp, '86; third vice-presi- 
dent, F. 0. Williams, '90; secretary, A. C. Monohan, 
1900; treasurer, E. B. Holland, '92; auditor, G. P. 
Smith, '79. Resolutions indorsing the work of Presi- 
dent Butterfield in his undertakings for promoting 
extension teaching in agriculture were adopted, 

The table was then set for the banquet, which was 
served by C. H. Rowe of Draper hall. The room 
was prettily decorated with palms and plants from the 
Durfee plant houses. The service was excellent. 
After the table had been cleared away, C. A. Judd, 
71, acting as toastmaster, opened the speaking of the 
evening with a few remarks on the binding influence 
of a local alumni association and its work in connect- 
ing the student body with alumni, faculty and trustees. 
With these few remarks of welcome he introduced 
President K. L. Butterfield, as the first speaker of 
the evening. President Butterfield spoke of the worn 
of the local alumni association in relation to the col- 
lege, the work of the dean in relation to college life, 
the broader scope which the normal department will 
: to the work of the college, and the coming cele- 
bration of the 40th anniversary of the college, and the 
35th anniversary of the experiment station. The next 
speaker introduced was Prof. William P. Brooks, 
director of the Massachusetts agricultural experiment 
station, who spoke upon the experiment station, and 



its work, pointing out the need of well trained men 
for the vast work before the station staff. 

Secretary A. C. Monohan then read the resolutions 
passed at the business meeting held just before the 
banquet was served. The next speaker introduced 
was Dr. Clinton of Michigan agricultural college, now 
director of the Connecticut agricultural experiment 
station. Dr. Clinton spoke of the great usefulness of 
the agricultural college and the place which it takes 
in the country's education. L. B. Caswell, '71, was 
introduced as one of the old guard of the class of ,71, 
the first class to enter the Massachusetts agricultural 
college. Mr. Caswell related a few reminiscences of 
the early days of the college, speaking with tender 
feeling of those who were connected with the college 
in its early days. The time drawing near when those 
present must leave in order to catch the last cars to 
their various destinations, the speaking of the evening 
was closed by a few remarks from President Butter- 
field in appreciation of the loyalty and pledged support 
of the alumni. About 45 sat down to the banquet. 

The resolutions which were adopted at this time are 
as follows : 

1. We have noted the effort of President Butter 
field to advance the idea of extension teaching and 
have seen that his suggestions and plans are gaining a 
hold in the minds of thinking agriculturists and 
educators. 

2. We have noted that the first step toward exten- 
sion work has been taken as there is now being organ- 
ized at the college a summer shool in elementary agri- 
culture and nature study for public school teachers, 
the first session of which will be held this year. 

3. We have noted with extreme pride that Presi- 
dent Butterfield has been selected as chairman of the 

Committee on Extension Work of all agricultural col- 
leges. Therefore be it 

Resolved : That we, the members of the Local 
Alumni association of the Massachusetts agricultural 
college and brother alumni meeting with us this day, 
do strongly and heartily endorse the efforts of our 
President, K. L. Butterfield, in this new work, pledg- 
ing him our active support and standing ever ready to 
help, and offering him for encouragement our best 
wishes for a complete success. 

Also, recognizing that the extension work requires 
financial aid, be it further 



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139 



Resolved : That the executive committee of this 
association be instructed to request the executive 
committee of the M. A. C. Alumni club of Boston 
that we may join with them in their petition to the 
legislature asking for an appropriation of $5000 
annually to be used by the Massachusetts agricultural 
college in carrying on extension work in this state 
along lines as suggested in the report of the National 
Committee in Circular 72 of the United States 
Department of Agriculture just issued. 



THE WORK OF JAMES DRAPER. 

James Draper, who died at Worcester Wednesday, 
had been for years an active worker in the interest of 
the Massachusetts agricultural college of which he 
was a trustee. The following tribute to his work 
comes from an official of the college : — 

Governor Hughes of New York in a public address 
not many months ago, in speaking of the times in 
which wr live, said : "It is a time when we want to 
hear less of the man who was born poor and achieved 
fortune and want to hear more of the man who 
remains unsullied." Such a man as Governor 
Hughes had in mind was James Draper of Worcester, 
whose death last week is the occasion of sincere 
grief throughout the wide circle of his acquaintance. 
Of one of the oldest and strongest families of New 
England stock- a family distinguished for the ability 
of many of its members, James Draper worthily 
upheld the traditions of his ancestry and added new 
luster to its name. It is not the purpose in this brief 
tribute to attempt to estimate Mr. Draper's career, 
but rather to touch upon it especially in its relations 
to the Massachusetts agricultural college and exper- 
iment station. 

James Draper was elected a trustee of the college 
in 1887, and had served it in that capacity for almost 
20 years. His service to the college had been char- 
acterized by an unusual degree of enthusiasm and 
activity. He has given most unsparingly both of 
time and energy. A man of thorough training and 
with a very broad experience, he used his talents 
without stint in the service of the college and the 
experiment station. During these 20 years Mr. 
Draper had been a member of several of the most 
important committees of the board of trustees. For 
many years he was a member of the committee on 



the farm and horticultural departments, and throughout 
most of this time he was chairman of the section of 
this committee especially charged with responsibility 
for the horticultural department. Mr. Draper had 
been interested in horticultural matters throughout his 
life, having >arly identified himself with the Worces- 
ter horticultural society and having served as expert 
judge of fruits in that society during many years. 
To his active interest, helpful suggestions, earnest 
work and careful supervision, the marked improve- 
ments which have been made in the horticultural 
department within recent years have been in no small 
measure due. Mr. Draper had also been prominent 
In the committee on the experiment station, in whose 
work he took the same active interest as in every 
movement with which he was in any way identified. 
For a number of years he was the chairman of this 
committee, and in the discharge of his duties showed 
the unfailing zeal and faithfulness and rendered the 
same generous service which invariably characterized 
him. It was, however, as a member of the commit- 
tee on buildings and grounds that Mr. Draper perhaps 
rendered his most important services to the college 
and experiment station. Of this committee he was 
for many years chairman. 

Mr. Draper was always quick to appreciate the 
needs of the college and, these needs once appreci- 
ated, he spared no effort in laboring for their realiza- 
tion. He was especially prominent in the movement 
which led to the erection of a new dining hall. In all 
the plans for this building he took the most active 
interest, and in connection with them made many 
helpful and valuable suggestions. In almost equal 
degree all of these statements are true in relation to 
his connection with Wilder hall, the new building for 
the horticultural department, and with Clark hall, 
which when completed will so splendidly accommo- 
date the botanical department of the college and sta- 
tion. As chairman of the committee on buildings. 
Mr. Draper had more to do with the awarding of the 
contracts for their construction than any other single 
person, and in this work, as in all the relations of life. 
he showed the most conscientious determination to 
discharge his duties in the best possible manner, and 
throughout the entire period of the construction of 
these buildings he never failed to make frequent visits 
of inspection, devoting a great deal of time (and 



always absolutely without compensation) to careful 
oversight of all the details of construction. 

Faithful and zealous as was tha service of Mr. 
Draper in all matters relating to the college, there 
was one movement not yet referred to with which 
perhaps he was more closely identified than with any 
other. As chairman of the committee on buildings 
and grounds Mr. Draper had more to do with all mat- 
ters affecting their arrangement and beautification 
than any other person. Tne further beautification of 
grounds for whose beauty Nature and those earlier 
connected with the college had both done so much, 
was perhaps nearer to his heart than any other matter 
affecting the Institution. A man of fine natural 
tastes, cultivated by study, travel and observation, 
and perfected by long service on the park commission 
of his home city, Mr. Draper was qualified in unusual 
degree for this particular line of service. It must, 
therefore, have been a source of great satisfaction to 
him to remember that bis last active work for the 
college he so much loved had been to preside at the 
first formal meeting of the recently appointed com- 
mission on new buildings and arrangement of grounds. 
At tnis meeting Mr. Draper was elected president of 
the commission. Plans were made for a thorough 
study of the problems involved and for the employ- 
ment of experts. The remembrance of his interest 
in this movement and the helpful suggestions which 
he made will be an inspiration to the members of the 
commission who must now carry on the work. Mr. 
Draper, however, must be most sadly missed, and 
precisely his place on the commission can never be 
filled. The college has been indebted to Mr'. Draper 
for a number of valuable material gifts, but his best 
gift to the institution is the memory of nis life, his 
services and his character. 

This tribute to Mr. Draper would be glaringly in- 
complete without reference to his membership and 
important service in the grange. His attitude toward 
the interests and movements for which the grange has 
stood has been similar to his attitude toward all other 
interests and movements with which he has been 
identified. For several years he was master of the 
state grange, in which position he rendered most im- 
portant service to the order. His interest in the 
grange movement, most lively from the first, conti- 
nued unabated from the end, and at the last conven- 



tion held In Boston in December, although then much 
broken in health, Mr. Draper took an active part in 
the sessions, losing no opportunity to work to the ex- 
tent of his ability in the interests of the order with 
which he was so prominently identified. 

In whatever position he might be placed he brought 
to the consideration of the matter in hand a lively 
interest, high intelligence and a most cheery opti- 
mism. He cherished the highest ideals and labored 
most zealously for their realization. He gave gene- 
rously of time and strength in the service of his fel- 
low-men. His was an ideal citizenship. Like all 
such men, he was modest and unassuming. He 
seemed unconscious that in his own life and character 
he most perfectly typified the realization of the advice 
the writer once heard him quote to a class of young 
men leaving college : "Do all the good you can in 
the world, and make no fuss about it." 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Ralph J. Watts, business manager of the College 
Signal for the college year 1906-1907 and a represen- 
tative of lhe Signal Board hereby presents to the 
Young Men's Christian Association of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College a piano, purchased from the 
surplus earnings of the College Signal for the year 
just ended. 

The conditions under which this gift is made are : 

1. That it shall be perpetually under the joint ma- 
nagement of the President of the Association and the 
President of the College. 

2. That it shall be housed in the rooms occupied 
by the Young Men's Christian Association and altho 
it may by arrangment with t. e above stated manage- 
ment be used in those rooms by the college or by 
other associations or organizations or by individuals 
not connected with the association, it shall not be con- 
sidered available for removal and use elsewhere. 



THE 1905 CLASS LETTER. 

"E pluribus unum," seems to be the watchword of 
tne class of 1905, and in every letter in the bunch 
some mention is made of this thought. Of all the 
classes that have gone out from this college none 
seems to have more class feeling, more unity, than 
Naughty-Five. "Some day we shall bunch up and 
give the yell. It is a great old class, and we must 



140 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*4« 



always hang together as in the old days." "We 
stuck together through thick and thin and some of 
the strongest friendships were formed in college ; and 
now that we are out in the world do not let us drift so 
far apart. Let us still be the closest of friends and 
keep in touch with one another." "1 feel that we as 
a class have more cause to feel a strong tie of friend- 
ship and class spirit than any other to graduate from 
old Massachusetts. We had a grand opportunity to 
see what the class as a whole was made of and to 
show people how we could stick together to accom- 
plish the best results for all concerned after we had 
made a mistake. Now let us go forward in the same 
way, as a unit, to glorify not only the class, to bene- 
fit not only the members of the class, but to glorify 
and benefit our college and raise her name in 
letters of blazing light before the admiring world." 
These are some of the sentiments expressed by dif- 
ferent members of class, and they speak well for its 
character. 

The letter, which contains something from every 
member of the class but two, who did not get suffic- 
ient notice, was sent out by Whitaker in the form of 
type written copies. The class may well be congrat- 
ulated on the success of its first letter, and others 
should be encouraged by their example, to do like- 
wise. In this way everyone is acquainted with the 
whereabouts of every other classmate, and is able to 
follow him in his career. The letters are all 
extremely interesting and tell something more than 
the bare facts of business. Some of the following 
notes may be new to the many friends of 1905 in 
college. 

Those members who are in California are Adams, 
Hunt, Ingham, Newhall and Yeaw. Dick Adams 
writes that he is working on pear blight under the 
the direction of Professor Smith, in Shasta and 
Tehama counties. He has something like 84,000 
blighted pear trees to think about. Tom Hunt is now 
working on the sugar-beet disease for the Spreckles 
Sugar company, in the Salmas Valley. Jack New- 
hall has been punching cattle on the small farms that 
he is interested in. Two of the four are over 48,000 
acres. He relates how he was heid up for looting at 
the San Francisco fire, but proved his innocence. 
Fred Yeaw tells of some of his interesting experiences 
in this rich western country. 



Other members of the class have also wandered 
far from their Alma Mater in the search of a liveli- 
hood. Casey Willis, assistant resident engineer with 
the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific railroad, 
at Stearns, Ky., tells some interesting stories of the 
mountain people of that state and Tennessee, who are 
noted for their "deadly feuds and deadlier moonshine 
whiskey." Dick Kelton seems to have succeeded In 
posing as a scientist of high order at the Michigan 
Agricultural college, where he is instructor in zoology. 
Pray, at Belmonte, Cuba, an ex-man of the class 
seems especially interested in the senoritas. 

Nearer the college we see many of the class busy 
along their chosen lines. Miss Sanborn, sometimes 
known as Betty, is interested in small fruits and poul- 
try and also, to some extent, in dairying. Miss 
Cushman is enjoying her work as school ma'am in 
North Smithfield. Taylor, since his graduation, has 
been teaching landscape gardening at Cornell, and 
last summer won his master's degree for work in 
horticulture and sytematic botany. Bill Munson is 
back at work in New York with the Munson-Whitaker 
company after a twelve weeks attack of typhoid fever. 
Many of the class were in Amherst at the time of the 
Amherst football game and all were well pleased with 
the work of our team. 



COMMUNICATION. 

To the Editor of the Collece Signal : 

An article which recently appeared in your column, 
if I construe it aright, dischampions the allied sciences 
of Forestry, Landscape Gardening and Entomology. 
I shall deem it a favor if you allow me to present a 
brief word on behalf of these professions. I quite 
concur with you that there are indications of a coming 
stringency in the money market, which is likely to 
result in a period of financial depression. In that 
event, of course, all lines of industry will be ham- 
pered, but Forestry, Landscape Gardening and Ento- 
mology no more than other pursuits. Your article 
would seem to indicate that you are not in close touch 
with existing conditions : Forestry etc. as municipal 
industries, it is admitted, are of comparatively recent 
inception; but, more and more, all over the land, 
cities are instituting departments whose sole business 
is the care, maintenance and protection of existing 
trees and the planting of additional ones. 



Just so long as parks, boulevards, public gardens, 
and the like, exist, so long will the cities have need of 
trained experts to supervise the care, maintenance 
and beautification of the same. Net only the cities 
but private individuals have long felt the need of 
expert advice and assistance along the lines. The 
erstwhile gardener has done his work, with the result 
that thousands of grand old trees in our cities and 
parks have been mutilated beyond description, but 
the gardener has passed from the scene, and 
the people are fast coming to the belief that technical 
men are indispensable — men of thorough training, 
well versed in the best scientific methods of treating 
trees, parks, wooded estates, etc. 

The people want men who can "deliver the goods," 
and where can these men be found? Nowhere 
except at the agricultural colleges. There never has 
been a time in our national history when the move- 
ment for things beautiful has been as strong as it is 
today. Art societies, boards of trade, park commis- 
sions and private individuals, are vying with each 
other in a grand clamor for the "City Beautiful. " 
The people are being trained to an appreciation of 
beauty in art and nature, and are rapidily acquiring an 
aesthetic taste which is bound to be satisfied. 

Beautiful parks and handsome trees scattered 
throughout the city are the dominating features of the 
"City Beautiful." The mellow green forms an 
effective background for all structures. It rests the 
eye, and sends the wandering mind back to the shady 
lanes and flower bestrewn paths of youth. These 
natural embellishments have ceased to be a luxury. 
They are now universally recognized to be a necessity. 
"Hard times" may come, but public demands must 
nevertheless be satisfied ; and as the cities become 
more densely populated, so will the number of parks, 
playgrounds, street trees, etc.. increase. 

As already said above, trained men are in demand ; 
Massachusetts has already an enviable reputation in 
this matter. Our men are recognized as being right 
behind the band, in the grand march of civic improve- 
ment. Let the good work go on. Let The Signal 
get in line, and boost. Encourage the underci?ss- 
men to take up this line of work. It is a pleasant 
calling— a fascinating profession. If there is no 
demand, get busy and create one. 

As to material rewards : The almighty dollar is not 



the chief end by any means. There is something 

higher and more worth while. Nevertheless it so 

happens that a life work devoted to the achieving of 

good for the people is bound to bring a sufficiency of 

reward in coin of the realm. 

H. B. Filer, '06. 

Newark, N. J., Feb. 25, 1907. 



Seminars. 



Y. M. C. A. 

At the meeting of March 7, the speaker was 
Fred L. Willis of the Worcester Y. M. C. A. and 
his subject, "Sight vs. Hearing." There are great 
advantages in seeing for one's self, instead of accept 
ing as truth the assertions of another. The loss of 
physical hearing is preferable to the loss of sight. Is 
it not, then, more important for a person to cultivate 
and exercise his powers of mental research and 
understanding, rather than to allow himself to drift, 
guided only by second-hand ideas of doubtful value. 
Bible reading and study are of great value in acquir- 
ing such originality. Mr. Willis is an interesting 
speaker and the close attention paid by the audience 
showed their appreciation. 

Thursday evening, March 14, the meeting was in 
charge of Mr. Franklin, '03, who is well-known to 
most of the undergraduates. The topic chosen was 
"College spirit from a Christian standpoint." Col- 
lege spirit is a test oftan applied in judging the worth 
of a college man. It is much spoken of, and is cer- 
tainly to be desired. Naturally the question arises, 
"What is college spirit?" Perverted ideas in this 
respect are too often held. Work for supremacy in 
athletics, noise-making, "rooting," office-holding, 
"plugging," — these are more or less generally 
regarded as synonyms for college spirit. Rightly 
directed, each helps in the formation of, yet cannot 
be said to be, true college spirit. 

We can generally accept the interpretation and 
leadership of the Christian. Tnus it would seem that 
college spirit consists in doing what is best for the 
college while an undergraduate and so conducting 
one's self in the world that credit will ever be 
reflected on the alma mater. 

When Mr. Franklin finished speaking, the meeting 
was opened and any who wished were given the oppor- 



142 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'43 



tunity to speak. It was said, and truly, that men are 
too often kept away from testimony meetings by the 
fear that they will be called upon to talk when they 
have nothing to say. This idea is false, and, more- 
over, much good may be gotten from the words of 
men who are in a position to speak and who do so. 
ESPERANTO. 

Regular meetings of the club were held on the 
evenings of March 6th and 13th. The pamphlet now 
being studied, "The whole of Esperanto," will prob- 
ably be finished before the coming recess, after which 
Bullen's Grammar will be taken up. 

The M. A. C. club has recently become affiliated 
with the American society and now recHves the 
Monthly Esperanto Journal, the organ of that society. 
STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 

H. R. Kinney, a market gardener of Worcester 
was the speaker on Tuesday evening, March 12. 
Not himself a graduate of the college, Mr. Kinney 
has two brothers in the alumni body and is thus more 
or less interested in the college and its work. The 
speaker touched upon various subjects, giving some 
good advice and telling some of his ideas, several of 
which, however acceptable, are certainly original and 
calculated to set one thinking. He said in part :— 
Agricultural teachers turned out by the colleges are 
well prepared for their work but the ideas of the 
people must be brought to the point where they will 
profit by instruction received. There is a great deal 
of agricultural land in Massachusetts which is worked 
little or not at all, yet the state buys many thousands 
of dollars worth of farm products yearly. The aver- 
age condition of agricultural lands is much lower than 
it was 25 years ago. Why do not the experiment stations 
find a means of interesting the farmers in doing welt 
such things as raising apples? This college itself, if 
it raises "bang up" good apples, does not exhibit 
them, for those sent to fairs and shows are really of 
but medium grade. 

The milk train is the ruination of the farmer. It 
is now too easv altogether for the farmer to set his 
milk out for collection and cash his check every 
month. Moreover, this farm product should not be 
carried away to the city. 

Mr. Kinney's remarks showed that he has a rather 
poor opinion of the experiment stations. Speaking of 



his own business he said that his two principal lines 
are celery and lettuce. Lettuce, spinach and celery 
pay well but he who raises them must work for his 
money. More profit can be made on straight farm 
vegetables. 



D*p&rtm*ivt* fJot*s. 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 
The senior class in landscape gardening is now 
engaged in a special study of Corot's landscapes. 
About 80 reproductions are displayed in Wilder hall. 
These bring out clearly Corot's methods of dealing 
with landscape, especially with trees. They exem- 
plify the best methods of composition, and show what 
there is in landscape which is considered beautiful by 
a great artist. Of course these monochrome repro- 
ductions do not show the magnificent color effects of 
Corot's original paintings, but in other points they 
are well worth study. 

A small but very attractive exhibition of photographs 
is now on view at Wilder hall. They are the work of 
several of the most noted photographers of America, 
and are made available through Professor Waugh's 
membership in a club of photo-artists. Most of 
those on exhibition are landscapes, the exhibition 
being primarily for the benefit of the landscape gar- 
dening students, in order to show the methods of 
various artists in dealing with landscape. 
EXPERIMENT STATION. 
The department of fertilizers has recently under- 
gone some thorough repairs and been equipped with 
improved apparatus in order to facilitate the work of 
analysis of fertilizers and soils. This department 
may now compare with the best of its kind in the 
country in the matter of equipment and facilities for 
analysis. 

The eight hour law has affected the labor question 
in the horticultural and farm departments quite mate- 
rially. This problem was made the subject of con- 
siderable discussion and consideration by the farm 
committee of the board of trustees, in conference 
with Professors Brooks and Waugh. it was decided 
that the eight-hour law applies to this institution and 
should be complied with both in letter and spirit ; but 
that in cases where it becomes necessary to employ 



men overtime in the farm work that the employees 
engaged in that work shall be hired by the hour, and 
given th^ir option of working over-time. 

At a recent meeting of the farm committee of the 
board of trustees, Professor Brooks outlined a plan of 
farm work this year which met with the fuli approval 
of the committee. The plan of work follows the 
same policy as in preceeding years but with more 
experimental work to be carried out this year. 



Geo. F. Vester Jr. 

TAILOR 



Al 



umm. 



AND 



'9 1 . — At a meeting of the Worcester County Mass- 
achusetts Horticultural society held in connection 
with the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Fruit 
Growers' association at Horticultural hall, Worcester, 
March 13, Dr. E. Porter Felt, state entomologist of 
New York, spoke on the subject, "Is the San Jose 
Scale Increasing and how can we Best Control It?" 

'92. — On Feb. 23 at a meeting of the Franklin 
Harvest club, held at the Warren house in South 
Deerfield, George E. Taylor, of Shelburne, read an 
interesting paper on agricultural education in the pub- 
lic schools. He brought out the importance of the 
movement and the fact that since farming is the 
most vital industry of our country farmers' children 
should be educated along lines which they will be 
likely to make their life work. They should be 
encouraged to think highly of farming and not to think 
honest work degrading. 

'94. _A. H. Kirkland, who has been very sick 
with typhoid fever during the past few weeks, we are 
pleased to say, is recovering. 

'94. — John E. Gifford, of Brockton, addressed an 
institute, held by the Three County agricultural soci- 
ety, at Easthampton, Thursday March 14. His sub- 
ject embraced agricultural fairs and dairy farming. 

'95. _ A. F. Burgess, formerly state nursery 
inspector of Ohio, now connected with the Gypsy 
moth work, spent a few days at college last week. 

'95. — At the Kentucky State Farmers' institute 
held at Shelbyville, Ky., Feb. 26 and 27, Prof. C. 
B. Lane, assistant chief of the dairy division, U. S. 
department of agriculture, took an active part. At 
the evening session, Tuesday, Feb. 26 he addressed 
the meeting on the subject "A Movement for Clean 



DRAPER 



485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 

All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal anil I will call on you. 

(yrull Dreaa Suits to rent. »-Student»' Uotlie* nought. 

1 1 Amity Street, Amhkkst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 
best in the market. 






NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



M4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Milk." On Wednesday Feb. 27, he spoke on "The 
Ideal Dairy Type." 

'95. — F. C. Tobey of West Stockbridge, was at 
the college for a short visit, on Monday, March 1 1 . 

'03.— E. G. Proulx, until recently connected with 
the department of chemistry of the Massachusetts 
experiment station, has resigned to accept a similar 
position at Lafayette, Ind. 

'01. — R. I. Smith, state entomologist of Georgia, 
has recently issued a bulletin on "The Apple Woolly 
Aphis," This bulletin contains a report on experi- 
ments conducted In 1905 and 1906, and there is also 
found a brief account of the wooly aphis, its appear- 
ance, habits, life history and nature of injury inflicted, 
together with remedial measures to be u^ed as pro- 
tection from these insects. 

'05.— A. N. Swain visited coliege recently. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

BOLTOKB, mass. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKKR & CO. 



Irvtsrcolltiia-te. 



The Amherst freshmen are taking substantial steps 
toward the abolishment of hazing at the college. 

On account of the enforced vacation at Amherst at 
the time of the scarlet fever epidemic, the Easter 
recess will be cut down to four days. 

The amount spent in athletics at Annapolis the 
past year was $8,1 14.87. Football cost $4,598.74, 
rowing $1,600, track athletics and baseball, $1,037. 

Williams has won the New England minor college 
basketball championship, and Yale has won the inter- 
collegiate basketball championship. Williams chal- 
lenged Yale to play for the college basketball cham 
pionship of America, but Yale declined because her 
team had disbanded and some of the men were out 
on the baseball squad. 



THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 

Most Attractive Cafe in New England. 

Private Dining IMNM for Ladies and Theatr.- Parties. 

Class and Fraternity Banquet* a specialty. 

Try onr Special Sunday Dinners, 5 i\ m. to 8.30 p. M , 50c. 

When in town give us a trial and t>e convinced. 

Open until midnight. 

EDWARD A. LEWIS, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - - Holyoke, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up-to- Date. 



COLLBOK CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

263 Main Strkkt, - - - NORTHAMPTON. 
Everything conked to order. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRWK, Projirietor. 



C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



Rabar's 3mu 

Old South Street, off Main, - NORTH AM I'TON, MASS. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PL^CYTO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 17, 1907 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should b« addressed. Coll.o. Siohal. Ahhmst. Mass. The S.ohal will be 
j,t,2 subscribers until it. discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested .. 
notify the Business Manager — — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK, 1908. Business Manager. 

O B. BR1CGS. 1909, Assistant Business Manager. 
O B. BRICCS. 1909. Alumni Notes. O. L. CLARK. .908. Department Notes. 

H. T. WHEELER. .908. College Notes. J- *• PARKER • J™/^ 

W HE R O C C LARK Y "9,0 909 ' ^^ * * ™ON. mo. ^ 

G. M. BROWN, 1909, Intercollegiate. 



Terms, fl.00 per qea 



r in sdesiics. Sinflle Copis.. lOe. Postage o.taid* el Uaito d State, sad Cea.de, t»c srtra. 



Y. M. C A. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
College Senate, 
Readir.g-Room Association. 
Basket-ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

C. H. White. Pres. Athletic Association. 

K. E. Gillett. Manager. Base- Ball Association, 

F. C. Peters. Pre* Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index. 

J. N. Summers, Sec. Fraternity Conference. 

E. D. Philbrick. Manager. Musical Association. 

Entered as second-claM matter, Post Office at Amherst. 
uimn\ % iMwmt, »v%-<»%% 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry, Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman, Manager. 



Edi-tbrials. 



The present number of The Signal was delayed a 
week that the time might come right for issuing a 
Commencement number during the last few days of 
college in June. The object is to cover in that issue 
the commencement news, which heretofore has been 
carried over until the first issue of the fall semester. 



The Senate has prepared concise and definite 
rulings on the matter of the freshman banquet— rul- 
ings which no one can misinterpret, which will nullify 
all previous precedents and establish a wise and defin- 
ite precedent for the years to come. The time dur- 
ing which the banquet may be held is definitely stipu- 
lated. There are no restrictions on the hour of day 
when freshmen may leave town. They may leave at 
any moment during the month and a half allowed 
them. The sophomores are forbidden to create a 
disturbance in another town, and the exact meaning 
of "disturbance" and "town" is embodied in the 



rulings. An exact definition of what shall consist a 
breaking up of the banquet is also given. The ener- 
gies of the sophomores will be directed toward retain- 
ing three or more officers of the freshman class. 
There will be no definite advantage gained In retain- 
ing from attendance at the banquet other members of 
the class. The rulings are simply and clearly 
expressed ; there will be no excuse for breaking them 
by either freshmen or sophomores. The danger of 
an occurrence which would bring discredit upon the 
college and its students is minimized, and yet at the 
same time a premium is placed upon the vigilance of 
both freshmen and sophomores. Again the Senate 
has proved itself a wise deliberative body, worthy of 
the utmost respect and hearty support of Ihe student 
body. 



A new season has brought with it new joy and new 
pleasures and new fields for work and thought. The 
woods, the fields, the mountains, the silvery streams, 
—all open to us again the old loved secrets ever new, 
ever inspiring to purity and nobility of purpose. All 












146 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



nature invites us to relax from winter's confinement 
to the freedom of out-of-doors. And yet there is 
somewhat of a gentle warning, even in the Invitation. 
There is one phase of the warning which the warmer 
nights and gently lapping waves of the college pond 
should bring to all underclassmen. This is the time 
of the year when all nature invites us to greater free- 
dom and greater liberties, but not to looseness in our 
college duties and behaviour. The question of haz- 
ing permeates the air, not because we still undeniably 
have something of the primitive man In us, not 
because the college authorities have ruled against it, 
but because, as ever, there is that in the underclass- 
men, or, at least, certain of them, which tantalizes 
and eggs on the disgust and resentment of those who 
have been "through the mill " and know what foolish 
vanities do possess the man who has yet to learn. 
We speak of the dignity of upperclassmen, and the 
words are received with a sort of knowing smile, and 
little credulity. No, the phrase is not a mere chi- 
mera. It has a deep and true meaning, though per- 
haps it is not well expressed by the term used. We 
were all of us underclassmen once, — we don't forget 
that, — and as we look back on those days when we 
had very little sense and a great deal of conceit, each 
one of us remembers, Oh how bitterly, many little 
words and actions which only the shortness of man's 
memory, and never our own, can blot out. When 
an upperclassman's memory thus plays havoc with his 
peace of mind he feels like taking himself out behind 
the barn, — the old "hash-house" is no more, — and 
running himself through a course of sprouts such as 
his barbarism would never invent for another offender. 
I say we feel that way toward ourselves. And is it 
not to be expected that at least some resentment 
shall express itself toward the other poor fool who 
occupies the arena today ? It is the most natural 
thing in the world. Yet we must all agree, for the 
benefit of those who are learning their lessons as the 
days go by, that the spirit of resentment is overdone 
in its physical expression, and underdone in its men- 
tal effort. We appeal rather to a man's fear than to 
his self-respect, meaning by "self-respect" the effort 
he makes to analize his own thoughts and actions with 
regard to right and wrong. It is this mental analysis 
and uprighting which we all pass through, and which 
is just the difference between upper and underclass- 



men. It is accomplished by experience, — a hard 
teacher, but a true one. Yes, there is a dignity of 
upperclassmen, a well-earned honor, for honor it is. 
It is hard to say to an underclassman "Do this," 
or "Don't do that." We can't lay down any hard 
and fast rules of behaviour. The underclassman 
must take himself in hand, must look at himself from 
another's standpoint, analize himself, notice when he 
causes offense, and when his actions meet approval. 
The training must come entirely from within himself. 
No course of sprouts will make a man of him. The 
only excuse for hazing is that it sets men thinking, 
and that is not an excuse, for there are other and 
better ways. Do we disagree there ? Never mind, 
the point is, the remedy lies with the underclassmen, 
whether you haze or not. The underclassman invari- 
ably takes the greatest liberties with his closest 
friends. As always, familiarity breeds contempt. 
Why should we try a friend's love for us by words 
and actions that we would not assume toward a 
stranger or mere acquaintance ! It is courtesy which 
accounts in friendship, just as much as in "social" 
life. And courtesy is the only rule which need gov- 
ern a freshman and, too, a sophomore, in his rela- 
tion to the college and its democratic life. College 
is a great teacher. 

/Athletic ftotts- 

BASEBALL. 

The late snow of last week has somewhat set back 
baseball activities, but the campus soon dried off 
after being scraped of the tardy snow by obliging 
freshmen, and is now in good condition for the game. 
The game with Holy Cross was something of a dis- 
appointment, not because it showed lack of baseball 
ability, but because the team seemed to be up against 
it at that time in hard luck. The conditions under 
which the game was played were adverse in many 
ways. The exact make-up of the team has not yet 
been determined. The schedule has been made out 
in full and approved by the athletic committee as 
follows : 

April. 6. Holy Cross at Worcester. 

13. Hoiyoke League at Holyoke. 

16. R. I. College at Kingston, R. I. 

17. Brown at Providence. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



M7 



20. Dartmouth at Hanover. 

24. Amherst at Amherst. 

27. Springfield Training School at Spring- 

field. 

May 4. Worcester P. I. at M. A. C. 

8. Trinity at Hartford. 

1 1. Norwich University at M. A. C. 

16. University of Vermont at Burlington. 

17. University of Vermont at Burlington. 

18. Norwich University at Northfield. 
20. Middlebury at Middlebury. 

22. Springfield Training School at M. A. C. 

25. Williams at Williamstown. 

28. Boston College at Boston. 

29. University of Maine at Orono, Me. 

30. Open. 

June 3. Andover at Andover. 

4. Cushing at Ashburnham. 

8. Boston College at M. A. C. 

Three long trips have been arranged, one to Rhode 
Island, one to Vermont, and one to Maine. There 
are 22 games, including one open date, four games 
more than were played by the college team last year. 

Two practice games were played week before last 
with Amherst. The game played on April 2, the 
day before college reopened after the Easter holidays, 
resulted in a victory for Amherst of 2 to 0. Smith 
had not returned from his vacation at that time, and 
the home team was obliged to borrow a catcher from 
Amherst for the occasion. The second practice 
game was played Thursday afternoon, April 4, and 
resulted in a victory for Massachusetts of 5 to 2, 
Hubbard and Cobb pitching, and Smith catching. At 
this time the college team showed promise of good 
material, arousing much enthusiasm for its support. 
The baseball men were retained at college during the 
Easter vacation for practice until Friday night, and 
were ordered back by the following Tuesday. 

The manager gives the following account of the 
game with Holy Cross at Worcester : April 6th we 
played our first game with Holy Cross. The weather 
was more fit for football. While we were defeated 
yet we played a better game than the score indicates. 
One thing that was encouraging was the way we hit 
the ball. We should not judge the strength of the 
team by this game. The field was in very poor con- 
dition and that may account for some of our errors. 
In the field Cobb andShattuck played well, while Cobb, 
O'Donell and Warner hit well. 



HOLY CROSS. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


5 


1 


2 








6 


3 





2 


2 


3 





5 


2 





5 


2 








2 


3 


2 


9 


1 





5 





1 








6 


3 








1 


4 


3 


10 


4 


1 


1 


1 





2 














1 





1 


1 











1 














— 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


40 


16 


27 


12 


6 


14. A. C. 










A.B. 


B. 


r.o. 


A. 


B. 


5 





1 








5 


2 


1 


2 





5 














5 


1 


3 


5 





4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


5 


1 











5 


1 


10 


1 


2 


5 


1 


6 





1 


2 


1 





4 


1 


















The score 



CahlM. m., 
Cashen. 2, 
Barry, s.. 

E. Flyrin, 3, 
Carney. I, 
O'Rouke, 1., 
Dowd, r.. 
Sweeney, c. 
Mansfield, p., 

F, F'ynn, s., 
Orchard. 
McMahon. p. 

Total, 



O'Crady, I., 
Cobb. 3. 
Clarke, m.. 
Shattuck. 2. 
O'Donnell. s., 
Warner, r., 
Johnson. 1, 
Smith, c. 
Hubbard, p.. 
Bean, 3, 

Total, 36 9 24 13 6 

Ho!v Cross. 2 4 12 12 7 -19 

M. A. C, 5 2-7 

Runs— CahlM, Cashen, Barry 3, E. Flynn 2. Carney 2. Rourke 2, 
Dowd 2, Sweeney 3. Mansfie'd 2. F. Flynn, Warner. Cobb 2. Clarke, 
Shattuck. O'Donnell 2. Sacrifice hits-Sweeney. Mansfield. Stolen bases 
— Cahill 2, Barrv 2. E. Flynn. Mansfie'd. O'Crady. Two base hits-Dowd 
Sweeney, Cahi'l. Three base hit -Warner. First base on balls -off 
McMahon 3. off Hubbard 7. Left on bases-Holy Cross 10. M. A. C-. 8. 
Struck oul-by Mansf'eld 8, by Hubbard 4. Hit by pitcher- Barry. 
Double plays— Sweeney to Barry ; Barry to Carney ; Shattuck to O'Donnell. 
Passed balls-Smith, Sweeney. Time— 2h.. 1 6m. Umpire— T. O'Reilly 
of Worcester. Attendance. 300. 

Holyoke 16, M. A. C, I. 

The college team went down to defeat before the 
strong Holyoke League nine last Saturday with a 
score of 16 to 1. The game was played in Holyoke 
under adverse conditions of weather, the day being 
cold and rainy. Hubbard's arm is bothering him, 
which considerably weakened the M. A. C. battery. 
Blaney pitched the first four innings, Hubbard the 
fifth and sixth, and Cobb the seventh, the eighth 
inning being called off on account of the rain. For 
M. A. C, Cobb excelled at third, his fielding being 
perfect, and both assists scoring on hard-hit balls. 
Warner excelled at the bat, scoring the only run for 
the college team. 

The score : 



Rhuland. 2. 
lott. 1. 
Lepine. r., 
Minnehan, r.. 
Baker. 1. 
Grubb. s., 
Barbour. 3. 
Carney, m.. 
Thackera, c, 
Whitley, p., 
Frazer, p.. 

Total. 



HOLYOKE. 

A.B. 
5 
6 
2 

5 
5 

5 

4 
3 
2 
2 



B. 
2 
5 
1 


I 

2 
1 

2 
1 
1 




P.O. 

I 







10 

1 



9 





A. 

3 





1 


4 



1 
I 



B. 



















39 



16 



21 



10 



i 4 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



149 



A.B. 

O'Grady, I.. 
Cobb, 3. p.. 
Clark, m.. 
Shattuck, 2. 
O'Donnell, s., 
Warner, r., 
Johnson. 1 , 
Smith, C.< 
Blaney, p., 
Hubbard, p.. 
Coleman, 3. 

Total. 
Holyoke. 
M. A. C, 

Runs— Rhuland 2, lott 3. Lepine. Baker. Barbour. Carney 2. Thackera 3. 
Whitley, Frazer 2, O'Donnell. Sacrifice hit— Cobb. Stolen bases— Rhu- 
land, lott, Lepine. Barbour. Two base hits— lott 2, Whit'ey. Rhuland. 
Crubb. Carney 2. First base on balls— off Blaney 4, off Hubbard 4, off 
Cobb 1 . off Whitley 2, off Frazer 1 . Left on bases-Holyoke 10. M. A. C. 
6. Struck out— by Whit'ey 3. by Frazer 5. by Blaney 1 , by Hubbard 1 , 
by Cobb 1 . Batter hit-Thackera. Passed ball— Thackera. Wild pitch— 
Blaney. Time— lh., 45m. Umpire— Geoffrey. Attendance, 400. 





3 







2 





1 




2 







1 


2 







3 




1 


2 










3 







1 


1 


2 




3 




1 





1 







3 




2 


2 





1 




2 







8 


1 


1 




3 







4 


1 







2 







1 


3 


















2 


























mm 




— 


mm 


— 


— 




24 




4 


21 


11 


5 


2 





1 


5 


3 





0—16 











1 








0— 1 



Colleg? N°**S- 



ANOTHER LOSS. 

Charles P. Halligan of the class of 1903, and 
for the past year instructor in horticulture and land- 
scape gardening, has accepted a position as assistant 
horticulturist of the Michigan agricultural college. 
Mr. Halligan left for Michigan last week Monday to 
take up his work immediately, and it is probable that 
no effort will be made to fill his place at Massachu- 
setts permanently until the beginning of another col- 
lege year. Mr. Halligan's work has been of high 
quality. He is one of those men who know how to 
handle classes of college men well, interesting the 
students in the work, and commanding their respect as 
a gentleman and an instructor. Outside of the class- 
room he was a loyal residential alumnus, always 
sympathizing with "the boys" In their sports and 
social functions, and lending his aid wherever possible. 
Mr. Halligan captained the college football team In 
his senior year, and during the past season rendered 
valuable service in coaching the first and second 
teams, and getting them into good form for the sea- 
son's scrimmages and games. As a member of the 
athletic board he rendered valuable service through 
long personal experience with the ins and outs of ath- 
letic enterprizes as carried on by student managers. 
Mr. Halligan's new work at Michigan offers broader 
scope to his abilities, and he bears with him in his 
work at the other M. A. C. the best wishes of all 
who knew him at this M. A. C. in the east. 



I 



NOTICE. 

The 1908 Index has arrived. Copies may be 
obtained from the manager, K. E. Gillett, 1908. 



— Cronyn, '09, has left college. 

— Dorsey Ingalis, ex. '08, is at Great Neck, Long 
Island. 

—The next informal will be held in the Drill Hall 
on April 20th. 

— On Monday April 8th the Seniors appeared at 
Chapel in caps and gowns. 

— Several members of the Junior class have been 
doing practical work in pruning about town. 

— This June instead of the Senior Prom, a recep- 
tion and dance termed a Sophomore-Senior Prom, is 
to be held. 

—J. R. Parker, '08, and E. T. Ladd, '05, are off 
on a month's trip for the Station collecting samples 
of fertilizers. 

— On the evening of March 25, Pres. K. L. But- 
terfield delivered an address before the R. I. League 
for Rural Progress. H.J.Wheeler, '83, was also 
on the program. 

— On Thursday afternoon Mar. 21st, Prof. Waugh 
entertained the art section of the Amherst Woman's 
Club at Wilder Hall with an exhibition of reproductions 
from the paintings of Corot. 

— On Sat. April 13, Pres. Butterfield attended a 
superintendents committee meeting of the Connect- 
icut Valley for the purpose of discussing the subject 
of agriculture in the schools. 

— On the evening of Friday April 12, Prof. Waugh 
delivered an address on "Agriculture as a Profession" 
before North Adams Y. M. C. A. This was one of 
a series of "practical talks." 

— The freshman basket-ball team was outplayed at 
Belchertown on the evening of Mar. 21 by a high- 
school team. Belchertown led from the start and 
won easily with a score of 26 to 12. 

— Pres. Butterfield has consented to deliver the 
first in a series of addresses on subjects relating to 
agricultural schools In the Western State Normal 
School at Kalamazoo, Michigan. The lecture is to 
be delivered some time in the latter part of May, and 
Pres. Butterfield's subject will be "Social Factors in 
Rural Progress." 



— "The Village," a pretty magazine of country 
life established in N. Y. city, has in its last number 
an appreciative article on "Village Betterment and 
Massachusetts Agricultural College," in which the 
work of Pres. Butterfield is especially commended. 

— The college and student body were represented 
at the funeral of James Draper in Worcester 
by Dr. William P. Brooks, Dr. George E. Stone, 
Prof. F. A. Waugh, Dr. J. B. Paige, Maj. W. E. 
Dickinson, 1907, Capt. W. F. Chase, 1907, Quar- 
termaster and First Lieut. J. H. Walker, 1907, and 
Gapt. and Adjt. J. N. Summers, 1907. 

— Pres. Butterfield attended a meeting of the 
editors of the Agricultural-Economic History of the 
United States, Monday, April 8, in New York. The 
meeting was held under the auspices of the Carnegie 
Institute. On the same day Pres. Butterfield also 
attended a meeting of the committee on Extension 
work of the Association of Agricultural Colleges, also 
held in New York. 

— The April 4 Thursday afternoon drill hour was 
given over to the observance of memorial services in 
remembrance of the late James Draper of Worcester, 
trustee and sincere friend of the college. The stu- 
dent body was addressed by Pres. K. L. Butterfield, 
Elmer D. Howe of the board of trustees, Dr. George 
E. Stone, Dr. William P. Brooks, Dr. James B. 
Paige and Prof. F. A. Waugh. 

The College Senate has ruled that the period 

from April 19th to June 1st shall, be "open season," 
for the Freshman Banquet ; that the detention of the 
class president or any other three class officers shall 
break up the banquet, and that no disturbance shall 
occur in any town to break up the banquet. The 
word town in this ruling means villiage or other 
thickly inhabited place where a disturbance might 
mean trouble. 

— For a long time the need of something better 
than the present Reading Room has been felt by the 
student body. The Reading Room has seen much 
abuse of late, partly because of poor management 
and support on the financial side, and partly because 
of Its barren and unattractive appearance. The 
present Reading Room is a handy place to 
drop into on wet days between hours ; otherwise it has 
no usefulness. Not long ago a plan was unfolded at 



an assembly whereby this long barren room might be 
made pleasant, and a suitable place in which to receive 
visitors, or in which those living outside of the dormi- 
tories may spend a quiet hour, or where all men in 
college may meet and be comrades together regard- 
less of class or fraternity. It is planned to have this 
room fixed up and to make it comfortable and in a 
small way to make it the trophy room of the college. 
Many hard won trophies are packed away around 
college or have been carried away by those who would 
gladly return them if a fitting place were made to 
receive them. Then if everything goes right we may 
have a piano to furnish entertainment once in a while. 
It is to be hoped that this movement will prosper 
and receive the support of all, for certainly this should 
become a great and good institution at M. A. C. 

THE 1908 INDEX. 

After many long and exasperating delays the 1908 
Index has at last arrived. It is hard to place the 
blame for such a seemingly unexcusably long delay. 
The work of the Index Board was done on time as per 
contract, but owing to a little misunderstanding had to 
be revised at the expense of five days extra time. 
This delay was inconsiderable, however. The work 
of the artist was also done in ample time, but the 
engravers were somewhat at fault in not forwarding 
the engravings promptly to the printers. Again, no 
considerable delay was experienced. The greater 
part of the blame undoubtedly lies with the printers, 
Tuttle & Company of Rutland, Vt., but just how 
much of that is excusable is a question. Tuttle &. 
Co. have recently suffered serious loss and inconven- 
ience through damages by fire, and the necessity of 
erecting and moving into new buildings has no doubt 
much hampered their regular work. It Is probable 
that they should never have contracted to print the 
annual under such embarrasing circumstances. The 
printing, although giving evidence of hasty work in 
places, is creditably done, and reflects favorably upon 
the great care exercised by the board in its prepara- 
tion of the subject matter and the subsequent proof- 
reading, and the faithfulness of the type-setters in 
setting up and correcting the copy. The volume is 
printed In a green sub-tone ink. 

The Index is a 250 page volume bound in stiff 
boards with beveled edges, the cover being of silver- 



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gray pebbled cloth with gold stamped margin bearing 
the letters in maroon, "The 1908 Index." In the 
lower right hand corner of the cover is stamped in 
maroon and gold the college seal. A brief fore-word 
expresses the sentiment of the book. It is dedicated 
to Richard Swann Lull, until recently assistant profes- 
sor of zoology at Massachusetts agricultural college, 
and now assistant professor of vertebrate paleantology 
and associate curator of vertebrate paleantology in the 
Peabody museum of Yale university. The article on 
Dr. Lull is written by Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck. The 
class histories and rolls are illustrated with character- 
istic drawings by the artist, as well as many photo- 
graphs. A special feature of this year's Index is an 
article on each department of the college work by the 
head of the department, accompanied by illustrations 
of the building occupied by the department and a 
photograph of the department head. The part of the 
book devoted to athletics is particularly interesting, the 
accounts of the careers of the various teams represent- 
ing college and classes being well written, and accom- 
panied by many photographs of the teams and special 
contests which they were engaged in. The individual 
histories of the members of the class are replete with 
humor and kindly "knocks," and remarkable in that 
they carefully avoid any references which might cause 
ill-feeling. The editorials were evidently carefully 
gauged to appear at about Chrishmas time, when the 
volume should by rights have appeared. However, 
they deal with subjects of vital college Interest even 
today, avoiding that critical element which often 
characterizes writings of this kind. The spirit 
throughout the book is one of implicit belief in the 
college and the type of work and education which it 
stands for. College loyalty has made of the 1908 
Index a book free from petty grudges against imper- 
fections in the college system, imperfections of which 
no institution is free. The morale of the Index is 
unimpeachable. It Is absolutely free from any vestige 
of vulgarity or coarseness. The "grinds" and other 
humorous portions are of good character and not 
of the disgusting type which often characterizes col- 
lege annuals. The work of the artist, James A. 
Hyslop, 1908, deserves special commendation. It is 
very rarely that one finds among students such true 
artistic ability as is displayed by the artist of the Index. 
A special feature of the artistic work is an appropriate 



cod-fish placed in the upper corner of each page, 
variously uniformed to represent different college 
activities and associated costumes. Sixteen different 
kinds of these curious little Massachusetts symbols 
appear in the pages of the Index. The de-luxe 
editions are bound in limp gray leather covers, 
stamped with maroon letters and margin, and gold 
seal. The book is larger and more expensive than 
any Index heretofore published. 



THE NEW CATALOGUE. 

The new catalog for 1906-1907 has been issued. 
It is practically the same as last year's catalog, with 
the exception of a few changes in personnell of the 
faculty, a change in entrance reqirements and a con- 
sequent change in the first two years' work in lan- 
guage, and a change In junior electives. Heretofore 
no foreign language has been required for admission, 
but hereafter either French or German will be required 
for entrance, and the time which the freshmen and 
sophomores have previously spent on both languages 
will hereafter be spent on the one language which the 
applicant has not submitted for admisson. On accouut 
of the shortness of notice of this change in entrance 
requirements, the next year's entering class will be 
admitted under the old conditions, with a chance to 
make up the required work in languages. The matter 
of Junior electives has been substantially changed for 
the betterment of the elective system. Hitherto the 
juniors have elected a course, and been obliged to 
take up certain subjects under that course. Here- 
after the junior will elect four subjects, closely corre- 
lated to the line of major study which he wishes to 
pursue. Senior electives are, of course, made con- 
ditional upon the studies elected in the junior year. 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 

Massachusetts is "wide a wake." There is not a 
period in her history when her future has looked 
more promising than at the present time. Since the 
new administration went into effect the college has 
made a marked progress in many ways. There is 
now an important movement on foot which will not 
only mean a great deal for Massachusetts, but one 
which will without doubt have a direct bearing upon 
the state, if not upon the country at large. 

An appropriation of $5000 annually from the state 



legislature for the purpose of starting a Normal 
Department at M. A. C. has been the means of the 
establishment of a summer school to be held for the 
first time this year, and lasting for a period of four 
weeks. The object of a school of this nature is to 
help grade teachers in New England common schools. 
Some of the subjects upon which special emphasis 
will be placed are : — practical gardening, school gar- 
dening, elementary agriculture, plant life, animal life, 
nature study, and the proper methods of using these 
in school work. Besides the regular course of study 
there will be time given to work of a concrete nature 
and on certain evenings there will be lectures on pop- 
ular topics by able speakers. 

Prof. F. A. Waugh, dean of the Summer School, 
has given a great deal of his time and thought in 
arranging for the coming session. Already he has 
received nearly three times the number of applications 
that were planned for and the prospects now are 
that there will be a large school comprising some of 
the best grammar, high, and normal school teachers 
in the state. The instructors who have, thus far, 
been secured, for the school, are as follows: — Prof. 
F. A. Waugh, dean, Prof. E. A. White, director, 
Dr. J. B. Paige, Dr. W. P. Brooks, Dr. C. F. 
Hodge, Philip Hemenway, E. H. Forbush, A. G. 
Monahan and others to be announced later. 

This movement is an important step in the progress 
of "Agricultural Education," and beginning with July 
8th of this year the "Summer School" will become a 
permanent institution at the college. 



always lived. He was a successful farmer and con- 
ducted a farm of 120 acres. He acquired a reputa- 
tion as a breeder of Guernsey cattle, and was the first 
to introduce them In this section. For many years 
he was a leading member of the Housatonlc Agri- 
cultural society and from 1879 to 1888 was a repre- 
sentative on the state board of agriculture. This 
was the longest term of office in that body ever held 
by one person. He had never sought for political 
office, but served as assessor and was also a member 
of the school board for five years. For many years 
he presided at the annual town meetings as modera- 
tor. When the Great Barrington savings bank was 
organized he became one of the trustees. Mr. 
Wheeler was also prominent in agricultural affairs of 
the state, and for the past ten years was a trustee of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural college. " 

Mr. Wheeler was appointed to the board of trus- 
tees of M. A. C. in 1894, and his present appoint- 
ment expired in 191 1. For twelve years Mr. Wheel- 
er has served faithfully and well as a trustee of the 
college, being associated all that time with the com- 
mittee on farm and horticulture, on which he was an 
earnest and enthusiastic worker. The college owes a 
deep debt of gratitude to Mr. Wheeler, which can 
only be expressed by a deep appreciation of his faith- 
ful and unrecompensed labor in her behalf. The 
funeral of Mr. Wheeler was held at his home last 
Wednesday. The college was represented at that 
time by Pres. Butterfield. 



MERRITT IVES WHEELER. 

Close upon the death of trustee James Draper of 
Worcester followed the death of another good friend 
and worker of the college, trustee Merritt I. Wheeler 
of Great Barrington. The Springfield Republican 
gives the following" account of Mr. Wheeler's death : 

" Merritt Ives Wheeler, one of the most prominent 
citizens of the town of Great Barrington, died at 10 
o'clock Sunday (April 9) morning at his home from 
heart trouble. Mr. Wheeler had been ailing for some 
weeks, but his condition was not critical until Satur- 
day night. He was one of the leading men of the 
town, and his judgment on public affairs was often 
sought. He was born in Great Barrington August 
29, 1826, at the Wheeler homestead, where he has 



PROGRAM FOR COMMENCEMENT, 1907. 

Friday evening, June 14, Flint Prize Oratorical 

Contest. 
Saturday evening, June 15, Burnham Prize Speaking. 
Sunday, June 16, 3-30 p. m., Baccalaureate Address. 
Monday, June 17, 11 -00 a.m., Meeting of Phi Kappa Phi. 
2 00 p. m., Senior Class Day. 
4-30 p. m.. Dedication of Clark Hall. 
7-00 p. m., Concert by College Band. 
8-30 p. m., Fraternity Banquets. 
Tuesday, June 18, Alumni Day. 

10-00 a.m. , Public Alumni Anniversary Meeting. 
11-15 a. m., Business Meeting of the Alumni 

Association. 
12-30 p. m., Alumni Dinner. 






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>53 



3-30 p. m., Concert by M. A. C. Musical 

Organizations. 
5-00 p. m., Drill of Clark Cadets. 
6-30 p. m. , Class Reunions. 
10-00 p. m., Sophomore-Senior Promenade. 
8-00 p. m. , Reception by President and 
Trustees. 
Wednesday, June 19, 10-00 a. m., Commencement 

Exercises. 



NOTICE. 

This certifies that I have this day examined the 
accounts of Mr. R. J. Watts, business manager of 
The Signal, for the year 1906-7, and have compared 
them with the vouchers and find them correct with a 
cash balance of $16.00 on hand, bills recivable 
(unpaid subscriptions and advertising) of $250.85, 
and liabilities of $16.59, making a total book balance 
in favor of The Signal of $250.26. In addition he 
has appropriated $2 15.00 for a piano for the Y.M.C.A. 

H. T. Fernald. 

March 22, 1907. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, It hath pleased God in His infinite wisdom to 
take unto himself the father of our beloved friend and brother 
James E. Draper ; be it 

Resolved. That we the members of the College Shakes- 
pearean Club do extend to him and his family our sincere 
sympathy in this their hour of sorrow ; and be it further 

Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, that a copy be filed in the records of the 
club and that a copy be published in the College Signal, 
Thomas A. Barry, ) 
Leroy A. Shattuck. > For the Club. 
John N. Summers, ) 



$c miners. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting held March 21st was called at 6-45 
o'clock for the purpose of electing of offcers for the 
coming year. Later Mr. Manwell of the North 
Amherst Congregational church gave an interesting 

address. 

On Thursday evening, April 4th, the regular meet- 
ing of the Y. M. C. A. was given over to a very inter- 
esting address by Dr. Benjamin F. Trueblood of 
Boston, representing the American peace society. 



He addressed the students upon the work of the Peace 
conference and its place in international arbitration, 
acting in response to the late Mohonk conference 
that the matter of international arbitration in the Inter- 
est of universal peace be brought to the attention of 
the college men of the country. The movement of 
universal peace is rapidly advancing and while uni- 
versal peace may never be, the present peace move- 
ment certainly means the advance of universal civili- 
zation. Dr. Trueblood said :—" War is the most 
foolish and feudal of human follies. Forty-four 
nations of the world have already signed treaties to 
the effect that they will first submit their disputes to 
the Hague conference before declaring war. So far 
in the twentieth century the Hague conference has 
settled four notable disputes, which would have event- 
ually ended in war. The main questions to be 
brought before the coming Hague conference will be 
those pertaining to the reduction of the armament of 
the nation. 

On the evening of April 1 1th A.E. Roberts, Secre- 
tary of County Work, had charge of the meeting. 
Mr. Roberts gave a very interesting and practical talk, 
taking for his point of view the verse in Matthew : 
"But seek ye first the kingdom of God and his right- 
eousness, and all these things will be added unto you." 
The opportunities even in this age of graft and corrupt 
politics to live a clean straight life were shown. He 
gave to us the examples of the great men of today 
and the influence of Christianity in their lives. We 
must be successes, and to be we must live the life that 
is on the level. 
STOCBRIDGE CLUB. 

P. M. Harwood, M. A. C, 75, now general 
agent for the Massachusetts Dairy Bureau gave an 
interesting talk before the Stockbridge club, Tuesday 
evening, March 19th. While Mr. Harwood discussed 
the milk standard to some extent, he stated that the 
enforcement of the milk laws was a part of the work 
of the State Board of Health. The Dairy Bureau 
oversees the enforcement of oleo and renovated butter 
laws. Besides showing actually the simple tests for 
the detection of these substances he told us fully of 
the laws and also of the methods of getting samples 
and prosecuting. Mr. Harwood, who has occasion 
to travel over the state, contradicted a statement 
from a preceeding lecture to the effect that Massa- 



chusetts farming was on the decline, stating that it 
was his observation that except for one or two classes 
(notably the Boston milk producers) we have advanced 
rather than declined. 

On the evening of April 9th Mr. J. Louis Ellsworth, 
Secretary State Board of Agriculture, addressed the 
Stockbridge club on "The better business methods in 
farming." He spoke of the importance of capital and 
its opportunities for use in farming in Massachusetts. 
He argued the wisdom of intensive farming with its 
high feeding and attention to details. A definite plan 
should be made and carried out in order to compete 
with other high class men. The highest success 
should be our aim and we should take nothing less. 
Mr. Ellsworth concluded with his business experience 
in market gardening and in the latter part of the meet- 
ing devoted himself to the answering of questions. 



D*p&rtm*rvf fslot^s. 



HORTICULTURE. 

The regular spring campaign of spraying is now on. 
A new one hundred gallon Niagara Gas Sprayer with 
a complete equipment has been obtained, with which 
a new soluble oil spray is being applied for the San 
Jose scale to the plum trees in the orchard. 

An improvement has been made in the office in 
Wilder Hall by putting in a partition, which gives 
more privacy to the officers at work in that room. 

Charles P. Halligan has resigned his position as 
instructor in this department to accept the position of 
assistant horticulturist under Prof. S. W. Fletcher 
at the Agricultural college of Michigan. 

BOTANY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

There is a bulletin in press on "A Blossom End 
Rot of Tomatoes" by Miss Elizabeth Smith which 
was submitted by her as a thesis in her studies for 
the degree of M. S. 

This department is engaged on the work of the 
separation of tobacco and onion seed. Dr. Stone 
has devised a special apparatus for separating tobacco 
seed. It consists of an hydraulic air pump from 
which a regulated force of air is directed through the 
seed which is contained in upright glass tubes about 
three feet in length. The light seed and chaff is 
blown out at the top of the tube, while the large, 
heavy, cleaned seed remains in the tube from which 
it is collected. For the separation of the onion seed 
a sort of fanning mill of German manufacture is used. 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 
The regular quarterly meeting of the committee on 
the experiment station met at the Amherst House 
April 3. The heads of the different departments of 
the station were present and each presented a brief 
report on the work of his department during the past 
year and on the work to be undertaken this year. 
Afterwards the regular business meeting was held and 
appropriations for the current quarter made. 

The director recommended, and the committee 
voted favorably on the following : (a) on the employ- 
ment of H. J. Franklin for special work on cranberry 
insects, beginning April 15; (b) on the appointment 
of W. E. Dickinson as third assistant in the depart- 
ment of fertilizers ; (c) and of J. N. Summers, '07, 
as assistant in the Entomological department, who will 
devote h?lf of his time to experiment station work 
and half to post graduate studies. These last two 
appointments will take effect July I. 

The director made a report upon the revision of the 
mailing list of the station. A mailing list of the dif- 
ferent cities and towns of the state was sent to the 
postmasters of them for revision. Of 921 lists sent 
out for revision 898 have been returned and of a total 
of 19,129 names on the lists sent out, the revision 
drops out 4,602 leaving a total, as far as heard 
from, of 14,527 names on the revised list for 
Massachusetts. 

A special list of 1,500 names of cranberry growers 
in the state has been obtained in connection with work 
on cranberry insects carried on by the station. 

DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY, DEPARTMENT 
OF FERTILIZERS. 
At this season of the year the annual official col- 
lection of commercial fertilizers takes place and E. 
T. Ladd, assisted by J. R. Parker, '08, is at pres- 
ent engaged in this work. The plan is to visit the 
more prominent towns within the state and take 
samples of every brand of fertilizer that can be found 
in the possession of agents. Many of the fertilizer 
agents are to be found of late years among the farm- 
ers; this, many times, necessitates the covering 
of a large territory to collect certain brands that 
may be sold only in local places. The collection 
usually takes from eight to ten weeks, during which 
time about 500 samples are taken ; these 500 
samples represent 350 to 360 distinct brands of fer- 






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'55 



tilizers. We aim to collect as many of the samples 
that are licensed as is possible. 

About 64 different firms secure licenses for the 
sale of fertilizers in Massachusetts each year. A 
complete chemical analysis is made of the 350 odd 
brands that are licensed, and the results of analysis, 
together with the manufacturers guaranteed com- 
position, are published in two bulletins, one issued in 
July and the other at the end of the season, usually 
in December. The fertilizer inspection work has 
gradually increased from year to year. During the 
past season 28 more brands were licensed that dur- 
ing the previous year. 

E. T. Ladd who was anticipating a course of 
study in Europe for the degree of Ph. D., has been 
induced to remain in the department another year 
and has been advanced to the position of second 
assistant chemist, the position made vacant by the 
resignation of E. G. Proulx. 

Walter E. Dickinson, '07, has been engaged as 
third assistant and will assume his new duties July 1. 



Alu 



mm. 



Alumni will greatly oblige the Alumni Notes 
Editor by sending him any notes with which 
they may be familiar. 

NOTICE ALUMNI. 
The Sophomore-Senior promenade will be held 
June 18, 1907. For particulars and invitations 
address Gordon R. Fulton, 

Amherst. 

'71.— Gideon H. Allen, 179 Court St., New 
Bedford. 

'82.— John W. Clark, a fruit grower of North 
Hadley was recently elected vice-president and 
director of the Massachusetts Fruit Growers' 

association. 

'81.— Dr. Austin Peters, chief of the Cattle 
Bureau, Massachusetts State Board of Agricul- 
ture, is reported as having a lively time over 
his dog-muzzling order, issued as a precautionary 
measure of public safety from dogs affected with 
rabies. The ladies of the Kennel club of Massachu- 
setts are making an effort to oust Dr. Peters when 
his term expires May 1 , and a petition signed by the 



women of the dog fanciers' club will go to Governor 
Guild urging some other incumbent for the office. 
As the New England Homestead says "Let the women 
of the Massachusetts Kennel club exert their effort 
in something which will be a benefit to mankind 
rather than to dogkind." 

'82.— Prof. C. S. Plumb of Ohio State Univer- 
sity has a valuable paper in the last number of the 
Breeders' Gazette on "Country Life and Rural 
Education. 

•82.— Dana E. Perkins, civil engineer and sur- 
veyor, 38 Thatcher St., Medford. 

'86. — Dr. George E. Stone has been appointed a 
member of the advisory board of the American For- 
estry association for the current year. On March 
29 Dr. Stone lectured before the tree-wardens of 
Connecticut on "Shade Trees." 

'87. — E. F. Richardson of Millis, a deputy of the 
State Grange, inspected Amherst Grange Friday 
night March 15, and visited college next day. 

'94. — The annual report of Superintendent A. H. 
Kirkland on the work of suppressing the gypsy and 
brown-tail moths has been presented to the legislature. 
This report is a valuable document, the illustrations 
being particularly good and informing. 

'95. — H. L. Frost, forester and entomologist, 6 
Beacon St., Boston, spent a day at college last week. 
'03. — Albert Parsons of Waverly, spent a few 
days around college last week. 

'03. — Born to Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Hood, a 
daughter, on March 6. Mr. Hood is Superintendent 
of Agriculture for the Industrial Missionary associa- 
tion at Beloit, Ala. 

'03 and '04. — Messers. Osmun, Franklin and Back 
spent Sunday recently at their country home in 
Guilford, Vt. 

'04. — A. W. Gilbert, assistant agriculturist, Orono, 
Me., spent a day around college recently. 

'04. — M. F. Ahearn has a good article in the last 
number of the Industrialist, the college paper of Kan- 
sas, on "How Boys and Girls may Beautify Home 
Grounds. ' ' 

'04. — O. B. Whipple, post-graduate student 1904- 
5, now field horticulturist for the Colorado Experi- 
ment station, sends a very Interesting bulletin by 



himself giving a detailed report of the condition of 
the fruit industries on "The Western Slope," as they 
call it in Colorado. 

'05. — Bertram Tupper, who has been foreman at 
the Ellis farm, West Newton, has now assumed full 
charge. 

'05.— Married at Hollywood, Cal., Norman D. 
Ingham to Miss Florence Bacon, March 22. Mr. 
Ingham is superintendent of the forestry station at 
Santo Monica, Cal. The brides family was formerly 
from Boston. 

'05. — F. A. Bartlett has accepted a position as 
manager of a large estate in Litchfield, Conn., which 
will be devoted to the growing of apples, eggs and a 
few other specialties. He will resign his position in 
Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va., and take up the 
new work about the first of May. 

'06. — D. H. Carey is employed with J. Wood- 
ward Manning, landscape architect of Reading. 

'06. — Francis M. Wholley, at present in Chicago, 
has been operated on three times in the last three 
months for pleurisy. At present his left lung is weak 
and he expects to go West soon. 

'06. — C. E. Hood has accepted a position as 
special field agent of the Bureau of Entomology, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. His work will be 
on the cotton boll weevil under the direction of Prof. 
Wilman Newell, at Baton Rouge, La. 



COl^LEGlS CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

Ml Main Strkkt, - - - NORTHAMPTON. 
Everything cooked to order. 



C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 

THE FAMOUS KOSTENBADER. 
Most Attractive Cafe i n New England. 

Private Dining Rooms for Ladies and Theatre Parties. 

Class and Fraternity Banquets a specialty. 
Try our Special Sunday Dinners, 5 p. m. to 8.30 p. m.. 50c. 
When in town give us a trial and he convinced- 
Open until midnight. 

EDWARD A. LEWIS, Manager. 

12-14 Suffolk St., - - Holtoke, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



Geo. F. Vester, Jr. 



TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 






485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 



ai.ho 



Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 

All orders promptly attended to. 
Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 
Full Drees Suite to rent. ^-Student*' Clotliee doukM. 



11 Amity Street, Amhkrst, Mash. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes tbe 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 
best in the market. 



NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



1 5 6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



If you want to make 
money this summer 

We have a proposition by which a man can, in three 
months, make more than enough to defray his college 
expenses for the neKt year. 

There is uo outfit to buy and no catechiam which you have to learn. All you need is your own gray 
matter and a little help from us from time to time. 

It you will write us, we will gladly explain how we 
propose to make your next college year free from 

financial worry. 

The Curtis Publishing Company. 



The Ladies' Home Jounral 
The Saturday Evening Post 



424 Cherry Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Broadway, and Duane St. ,New York. 
A HAVARD MAN 

Whom we placed with a large publishing house a year ago 
has Just been advanced to the managership of an important 
department. He is only one of the 1500 college men placed in 
satisfactory positions last yenr. In each of our offices is a 
department exclusively for college men. Each man's case 
receives personal attention and our employment experts find 
for him the position in business, in teaching or in technical 
work which he is best fitted to fill. Write us to-day and we 
will tell you what w« can do for you. 

HAPGOODS, 

The National Organization of Brain Brokers. 



Rabars 31111, 



Old South Street, off Main, 



NORTHAMPTON, MA 88. 



Modern Improvements, Fine Ontlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB. DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with ns. 



THE BEST PL ACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 1. 1907 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni arc requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collig* Siohal. Amhmst. Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receiye their paper regularly are requested le 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER, 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager. 

O. B. BRICCS. I 909. Assistant Business Manager. 
O. B. BRICGS. 1909. Alumni Notes. O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. 

H. T. WHEELER. 1908, College Notes. J. R- PARKER. 1908, Athletics. 

THEO. CRONYN. 1909. Seminars. C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 

W. R. CLARK, 1910. E. D. DAMON, 1910. 

C. M. BROWN. 1909, Intercollegiate. 



Terms. $1.00 per near in adoanco. Single Copioa, 10c. Postago outside of United States and Canada. 8ftc. extra. 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot- Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Reading-Room Association, 
Basket-ball Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

Athletic Association. 

Base- Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight Index. 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association, 



C. H. White. Pres. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters, Pres. 
J.N. Summers, Sec. 
E. D. Philbrick. Manager. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry. Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 

F. C. Peters, Pres. 

G. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 



_Ldi"tbri_ls. 



The change in the method of the choice of junior 
electives marks a distinct advance in the arrangement 
of the college curriculum. Formerly, the sophomore, 
making a choice of studies for his junior year, had six 
courses to choose from, and beyond that choice there 
was no latitude. The result was dissatisfaction to a 
greater or less extent with all the courses, not because 
the courses were necessarily at fault, but because of 
the different valuation which different students and 
different professors placed on major and minor sub- 
jects. Under the present arrangement of junior elect 
ive subjects, the sophomore may chose his minor 
subjects with relation to their bearing upon his majors 
and the amount of time he wishes to give to each. 
This places a still greater responsibility upon the mat- 
ter of junior electives. The junior electives pract- 
ically determine what the senior electives shall be, 
and if any dissatisfaction at the end of the junior year 
Is felt with the course of studies chosen, there is but 



little redress in way of a change for the senior year. 
As concrete examples, it might be possible to change 
from a biological course to a horticultural or agricul- 
tural course, or from a mathematical course to a 
course in landscape gardening, but it would not be 
possible to change from horticulture or agriculture to 
mathematics, landscape gardening or chemistry. A 
sophomore choosing his junior electives should there- 
fore have well in mind what his particular object in com- 
ing to M.A.C. is ; that is what field of work he is inter- 
ested in and wishes to fit himself for. Then he must 
carefully plan the last two years of his college course 
so that he may achieve that end, at the same time 
broadening his education with such minor subjects as 
will give him a good mental foundation for a happy 
and useful life. The individual who looks at the 
utilitarian side alone of his education, that is, from 
the stand-point of dollars and cents, fails to grasp the 
deeper "utility" of a college education. It Is the 
man with the broadest mental foundations who is 
going to make the greatest "practical" success. The 
truth of the matter is, those courses which we are 





i 5 8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»39 



want to speak of as most "practical" in our curric- 
ulum are the easiest to grasp, and the real mental 
training comes in on mathematics, physics, languages 
and the so-called sciences. The mind adapts itself 
more easily to concrete, practical sciences than to 
abstruse, mental problems. There are always a few 
men each year who realize too late that they have 
made a mistake in their electives. The man who 
lacks interest in his course, and finds himself unable 
to change to another course which does interest him, 
is unhappy in his college work and restless under the 
restraint which his ill-chosen course places upon him. 
He feels that his time and money are not being 
turned to good advantage, for his standard of work is 
comparatively low. The simple warning is for every- 
one to thoroughly familiarize himself with the entire 
scope of junior and senior work before making a choice 
of subjects, and then, after making that choice, to 
put one's best work into the majors chosen, and as 
much time as can well be afforded into minor subjects 
which will make one's education sound and complete. 



5 
1 

3 



7 8 9 

0—14 

4 3-13 



/Uhlet'ic No*«S- 



the firing line. Although weak at times, he was able 
to pull out a victory. The game itself was marked 
by heavy hitting and poor fielding. At the bat every- 
one with the exception of Clark connected safely. 
Our errors were costly at times. 
The summary : — 

Innings. ' 2 3 * 

MA C 4 9 

R.I.S.C. 110 1 

Batteries-Blaney and Smith ; Kindrick and Feny. 

Brown, 1 ; M. A. C, 0. 
On the following day we met defeat at Providence 
in a hard fought game. It took Brown 1 1 Innings to 
win. The game itself was a good one in spite of the 
cold weather. By good fielding, especially on the 
part of our battery, we were able to make Brown go 
the extra distance, Buss conquering over Cobb In the 
pitcher'"; battle which ensued. Brown came near 
scoring in the ninth inning when errors by Shattuck, 
Cobb and Coleman filled the bases with none out. 
By fast fielding Cobb threw out two men at the plate 
while Smith figured in a double play on the last man. 
In the eleventh, a base on balls, a stolen base and a 
hit scored the winning run with two men out. 
The summary :— 



BASEBALL. 



Since the Holyoke League game, the baseball 
team has taken a big brace. The hitting and fielding 
have improved admirably. Many of the players have 
taken advantage of their opportunities to show their 
worth. The old men have struck their pace and 
their work has been an improvement over last year. 
The new men are overcoming their nervousness and 
playing good ball. Without a doubt Massachusetts 
has a team of no mean calibre and one deserving the 
support of everyone connected with the college. 
Captain Cobb has shown his worth in coaching the 
players. Coach Breckenridge has done a lot of good 
for the team which is being shown by the playing so 
far. Manager Barry is managing the team very suc- 
cessfully and now only needs the support of the stu- 
dents which is being given liberally. 

M. A. C, 14; R. I. S. C, 13. 
After a tedious ride to Kingston, R. I. the team 
met and defeated Rhode Island State college on 
Tuesday, April 16. Blaney, a new recruit, was on 



Dennis, c. (.. 
Jones, s. s., 
Paine, c. 
Elrod. I b., 
Raymond, r. f.» 
Dickinson. 2 b., 
Budlong. 3 b., 
Keen. I. f., 
Tift. I. f.. 
Buss, p., 



Total. 



A.B. 

5 
5 
5 
S 
5 
4 
5 

4 
4 

41 



BROWN. 

R. 







I 






1 



IB. 



I 
1 


2 




2 




S.B. 






1 





1 



P.O. 




14 
13 

I 

2 

1 

1 



1 

33 



A. 


2 




5 



3 

10 













I 



A.B. 

5 
5 
5 

4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 

30 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
IB. 

1 



1 
I 
I 


















S.B. 













P.O. 



3 





3 

1 
13 
12 





A. 


6 

3 
2 




1 
I 





I 



I 
1 





1 



O'Grady. 1. f.. 
Cobb. p.. 
Clark, c. f , 
O'Donne'l, s. s., 
Shattuck. 2 b., 
Warner, r. f , 
Johnson. 1 b., 
Smith, c, 
Coleman. 3 b.. 

Total, 30 

Innings, ' * 

Brown, ° " 

Massachusetts. « u 

•Two out winning runs scored. 

Dartmouth, 4; Massachusetts, 0. 

On April 20 the team journeyed to Hanover, N. 

H. to meet defeat in a well played game at the hands 

of Dartmouth. The weather was exceedingly cold 

and the grounds in very poor condition. The game 



o 

6 






•32 
8 o 





13 4 

10 11 

0—1 

0—0 



was played on the campus instead of on Alumni Oval 
on account of the wet condition of the oval. Both 
Glaze and Cobb pitched in fine form, the former 
receiving better support at critical moments. Schild- 
miller started the scoring in the opening inning on a 
three-base hit and a long fly to right by McDevitt. 
In the sixth Schidmiiler singled, advanced on Mer- 
ritt's hit, reached third on McDevitt 's sacrifice and 
scored on O'DonnelPs error. In the eighth Merritt 
and McDevitt scored on two singles and two errors. 
In the second Massachusetts came near scoring on 
two singles and a sacrifice but Glaze struck the next 
two men out and prevented our scoring. 
The summary : — 



Schildmiller, I b., 
Merritt. r. f.. 
McDevitt. c f.. 
Skil'en, 1. (.. 
Crebenstein. 3 b., 
Richardson, s. s.. 
McLane. c , 
Norton, 2 b , 
Glaze, p., 

Tottl, 



O'Crady. 1. f.. 
Cobb, p., 
Clark, c. f.. 
O'Donne'l. s. ■», 
Shattuck, 2 b., 
Warner, r. f., 
Johnson, I b., 
Smith, c. 
Shaw. 3 b.. 

Total. 

Innings, 

Dartmouth, 

Massachusetts, 



DARTMOUTH. 
A.B. R. 

4 



■i 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 
J 
3 



2 
I 

1 










B.H. 

2 

I 
I 
1 









P.O. 
10 





I 

3 
3 
9 
I 




A. 






2 
I 
I 
4 



31 4 

MASSACHUSETTS. 



27 



A.B. 


R. 




B.H. 




P.O. 


A. 


B. 


3 












1 





1 


4 












2 


4 





4 












2 








4 







2 







5 


1 


4 







1 




1 





1 


2 





















a 












12 





1 


a 












6 


1 





2 















4 


3 


29 







3 




24 


14 


7 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 8 


9 




1 











I 


2 


0-4 



00000000 0—0 

Amherst, 3; Massachusetts, 0. 
With a strong head wind blowing across the field, 
making ordinary hits easy balls for the fielders, we 
met defeat on Pratt field by a score of 3 to 0. Both 
pitchers were in rare form and pitched excellent ball. 
Pierce received better support at critical times, which 
enabled him to pull out a victory. In the fifth, with 
two out, O'Donnell fumbled a grounder which opened 
up the way for Amherst's runs. For Amherst, 
Beach made a pretty catch off O'Donnell 's bat in the 
opening inning. Palmer and Henry also played well. 
McClure was able to solve Hubbard's curves twice. 
For Massachusetts, Johnson and Shattuck played 
well. Cobb made the best play of the day, taking 
Palmer's line drive over third in a pretty manner. 
O'Grady gave a good exhibition of base-running in 



the third when he beat out a well-placed bunt along 
first base line. 

In the opening Inning O'Grady reached first on 
Michael's error, was advanced to second on Cobb's 
sacrifice, reached third on Clark's grounder to 
Palmer. O'Donnell then flied to Beach. Jube 
opened Amherst's half by striking out. Palmer was 
thrown out, Hubbard to Johnson. Shattuck flied to 
Beach. 

Second inning — Shattuck out, Henry to Palmer. 
Warner flied to Beach and Johnson was thrown out, 
Michael to Palmer. McClure out, Cobb to Johnson. 
Henry struck out. Danahey was thrown out at first 
by O'Donnell. 

Third inning— Smith reached first on Michael's 
error, was advanced a base when Hubbard received a 
pass. O'Grady then got a hit but Cobb flied to 
McClure, who threw Smith out at the plate. Clark 
grounded to Palmer. 

Michael out, Cobb to Johnson, Caughey received a 
pass and stole second. Pierce fanned, and Jube 
grounded to O'Donnell. 

Fourth inning — O'Donnell flied to McClure, Shat- 
tuck out, Peirce to Palmer. Warner received a 
pass but Johnson was thrown out at first by Michael. 
Cobb gathered in Palmer's hot liner. Beach 
grounded to Shattuck. McClure got a hit, stole sec- 
ond, Henry got a pass but Hubbard threw Danahey 
out at first. 

Fifth inning— Smith flied to centre, Beach threw 
Hubbard out, O'Grady reached first on Jube's error, 
but was thrown out by Henry stealing second. 

Hubbard then hit Michael and Caughey. Pierce 
fanned. Shattuck threw Jube out at first. Palmer 
reached first on O'Donnell's error, two runs scoring. 
He scored later on a passed ball. Beach lifted a 
high one which Smith handled easily. 

Sixth inning — Cobb grounded to Palmer, Clark 
out, Jube to Palmer, O'Donnell filed to McClure. 

McClure flied to Clark, Hubbard threw Henry out. 
Danahey received a pass but Michael flied to 
O'Grady. 

Seventh inning — Shattuck received a hit, was 
advanced when Warner received a pass but was 
thrown out at third on Johnson's grounder to Palmer. 
Warner was advanced to third but Johnson was 



i6o 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



161 



thrown out at second, Beach to Jube on Smith's 
grounder. Hubbard struck out. 

Caughey flied to Shattuck. Pierce was thrown 
out by Hubbard, Jube reached first on O'Donnell's 
error, stole second, but Palmer struck out. 

Eighth inning — 'Grady received a pass but was 
thrown out at second on Cobb's grounder to Beach. 
Cobb stole second, Clark fanned, and O'Donnell went 
out, Jube to Palmer. 

Beach flied to Shattuck. McClure got a hit, but 
was caught napping at first by Hubbard. Henry got 
a hit and stole second base. Danahey went out, 
Shattuck to Johnson. 

Ninth inning — Shattuck was thrown out at first by 
Pierce, Warner flied to Beach and Johnson flied to 
McClure. 

The summary \ — 



Collect .Notts- 



Jube, s. »•. 
Palmer. 1 b.. 
Beach, 2 b.. 
McClure, I. (.. 
Henry, c. 
Danahey, r. f.. 
Michael. 3 b.. 
Caughey. c. f.. 
Pierce, p.. 

ToUl, 



OCrady, I. (., 
Cobb, 3 b., 
Clark, c. f., 
O'Oonnell. s. s. 
Shattuck, 2 b.. 
Warner, r. f., 
Johnson, 1 b., 
Smith, c. 
Hubbard, p., 

Total. 

Innings, 

Amherst. 

Massachusetts 



AMHBRST. 
A.B. 

4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
I 
3 



R. 



I 









I 
1 
o 



B.H. 




2 
1 








P.O. 

2 
13 

4 
4 
3 

1 






A. 

2 
1 
3 
1 

2 

2 

4 



28 



27 



15 



MASSACHUSETTS 














A.B. 


K. 




B.H. 




P.O. 




A. 


3 







1 




1 







3 












1 




7 


4 












1 







4 

















2 


4 







1 




3 




2 


2 




















4 












12 







3 












6 







2 












6 




4 


29 







2 




24 




10 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 
















3 
































0—3 
0—0 



Springfield Training School, 4 ; Massachusetts, 0. 

A full account of the game will be given in the 
next issue of the Signal. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT. 



The Young Men's Christian Association wishes to 
thank the last year's Signal Board for its recent gift 
of a splendid piano to the association and especially 
to thank Ralph J. Watts through whose excellent 
management and business ability the gift was made 
possible. 



CONCERT. 
The M. A. C. Orchestral Association will give 
a musical concert May 8 in Stone Chapel at 
8 p. m. 

—April 19, Patriot's Day, was observed as a 
holiday at the college. 

—The April Metropolitan contained a snappy short 
story, "The Toff" by Professor Neal. 

— A marking stone has recently been placed near 
the '82 class tree in the little triangle in front of 
North College. 

— W. E. Adams, '09, has been chosen to fill the 
place upon the Signal Board left vacant by Theodore 
Cronyn, '09, who has left college. 

—The senior class in horticulture is engaged in the 
work of crossing and hybridizing of different plants, 
the work being carried out in the greenhouses. 

—The senior class in landscape gardening has been 
making practical application of the course by assisting 
in the planting of the grounds about Wilder Hall. 

— A full account of Professor Herrick's lecture on 
"Ocean Steamships" on the evening of April 26 will 
be given in the next edition of the Sicnal. Lack of 
space prohibits publishing an account which will do it 
justice in this edition. 

—Prof. F. A. Waugh went to Mendon Wednes- 
day, April 17, and addressed the Blackstone Valley 
Agricultural society on teaching agriculture and nature 
study in the public schools. The public schools 
turned out en masse to hear the lecture. 

— The following officers have been chosen for the 
ensuing year for the Y. M. C. A. : President, C. H. 
White, '09; vice-president, S. J. Wright, '08; 
corresponding secretary, L. D. Larsen, '08. The 
office of secretary is to be filled by appointment. 

— The next informal dance will be held in the Drill 
Hall May 1 1 . This will be the last informal of the 
year, the last social event of the year being the sopho- 
more-senior promenade. On the afternoon of May 
1 1 the baseball team plays Norwich university on the 
campus, which will make an interesting preliminary to 
the informal. 



— H. E. Alley, '07, who has been confined to the 
hospital at Northampton since Feb. 22 with a severe 
case of acute rheumatism, was able to return to col- 
lege about a week ago. Mr. Alley spent a few days 
around college, returning Monday to his home in 
Gloucester where he will endeavor to regain his 
strength by another year. Mr. Alley will be unable 
to graduate with his class, but will in all probability 
return with '08. 

— Professor Waugh has secured for the summer 
school the services of Dr. Clarence Moores Weed, a 
distinguished writer and autority on nature study and 
teaching, who will give the work on insect life at M. 
A. C. this summer. Dr. Weed Is regularly connected 
with the state normal school at Lowell, and was 
formerly at the head of the department of zoology in 
New Hampshire State college. He has had many 
years' of experience in teaching teachers, and will be 
a distinct addition to the faculty of the summer school. 

— A pamphlet entitled "Southern Woodlands," 
being a journal of forestry, lumbering, wood manu- 
facture and related sciences and industries, published 
by the Georgia Forest Association, bears the signature 
of Prof. Alfred Akerman, for the past few years 
special instructor in forestry at M. A. C, and at 
present professor of forest engineering at the Univer- 
sity of Georgia. The publication is of a periodical 
nature, the present number being Vol. I, No. I, suc- 
ceeding numbers to be printed bi-monthly. 

— Dr. Burt L. Hartwell of the class of '89, and at 
present associate chemist of the Rhode Island experi- 
ment station, has presented the college with an almost 
complete set of unbound copies of the Aggie Life and 
College Signal. The set is valuable because of its 
completeness, and as soon as the few missing num- 
bers are determined an effort will be made to secure 
from alumni or student libraries the copies necessary 
to make a complete library of the college publication. 
The copies will then be bound and placed in the 
library for reference. The Aggie Life was first pub- 
lished in 1889 as a fortnightly periodical, and continu- 
ing the same today, the name, however, being changed 
in 1901 to College Signal. Mr. Hartwell 's gift 
therefore, comprises 17 volumes, with the exception 
of a few missing copies. 



CAPS AND GOWNS. 

At this season of the academic year it is interest- 
ing to note somewhat of the history of the cap and 
gown. As an additional note, it may be pointed out 
that the authorities at Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology have forbidden the seniors to wear the 
cap and gown, — a movement which, by the way, is 
fully sympathized with by the seniors,— maintaining 
that such an assumption of dignity by college men 
is distasteful in its signification of superiority over the 
ordinary non-academic individual. Of course there 
are more ways than one of looking at the question. 
The following historical sketch Is taken from the 
Dundee (Scotland) Advertiser \ 

"Academic costume was originally the ordinary 
dress of the period in which it was prescribed. Medi- 
eval statutes were directed not to the wearing of any 
particular robe but against extravagant taste in or 
deficiencies of dress. At Heidelberg, for instance, 
students were forbidden to go out without boots 'unless 
clad in a garment reaching to the heels.' The most 
purely academic part of the costume was the square 
cap of biretta, 'With a tuft on top (in lieu of the 
very modern tassel), which was the distinctive badge 
of the mastership.' Its possession was much cov- 
eted and, according to one authority, 'it is only in 
post-medieval times that the biretta, first without, 
then with, the sacred "apex," has been usurped 
first by bachelors, then by undergraduates and now 
(outside the universities) by mere choristers or school- 
boys. ' The gown, or togo, on the other hand, was 
an unofficial robe or cassock of various colors, the 
favorites at Oxford being 'green, blue or blood 
color.' " 



A NEW TRUSTEE. 

The vacancy on the Board of Trustees caused by 
the death of the late Hon. James Draper of Wor- 
cester will be filled by Hon. Frank Gerrett of Greenfield. 
He is a man of wide reputation and has held many 
important offices in the town and has been a member 
of the Legislature serving as representative and as 
senator in 1905 and 1906. Mr. Gerrett takes an 
active interest in agricultural education and will with- 
out doubt be a worthy successor to the late Hon. 
James Draper. 



i6a 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



163 






INFORMAL DANCE. 

An Informal Dance was held in the Drill-hall on 
the afternoon and evening of April 20. The dance 
was very well attended, about 40 couples being pres- 
ent. A fierce gale from the north, bringing with it 
the wintry chills of the Berkshlres, made going to and 
from the Drill-hall and Draper Hall rather difficult, 
but otherwise the evening was very pleasantly spent. 
The floor was in especially good condition, and the 
decorations of plants and palms and banners tastily 
arranged. The music was furnished by Derrick's 
Westfield orchestra, and was of a high quality. Lunch 
at intermission was served at Draper Hall by Mrs. 
Rowe, the tables being prettily set with early spring 
potted plants, such as jonquils, tulips, hyacinths, and 
cinnerarias. The patronesses were Mrs. Wellington, 
Mrs. Cordon and Mrs. Martin of the faculty, Mrs. 
Orcutt of Smith and Miss Hadley of Mount Holyoke. 
Among those who attended were : 

1. H. Walker and Miss Wilson of So. Hadley; 
F. A. Cutter and Miss Livers of M. A. C. ; J. F. 
Eastman and Miss Johnson of Mt. Holyoke; F. C. 
Peters and Miss Griffiths of Northampton; C. B. 
Thompson and Miss Hadley of Mt. Holyoke; W. A. 
Evans of Boston and Miss Perry of Wilbraham ; D. 
P Miller and Miss Whipple of Mt. Holyoke ; Carle- 
ton Bates and Miss Massey of Smith ; O. L.Clark and 
Miss Brooks of Amherst; R. M. Eastman and Miss 
Bryant of Mt. Holyoke ; W. Coleman and Miss Cal- 
bume Thompson of Easthampton; C. Flint and Miss 
Kent of Mt. Holyoke ; K. E. Gillet and Miss Southan 
of Mt. Holyoke; L. K. Liang and Miss Knapp of 
Burnham ; R. H. Verbeck and Miss French of Smith ; 
F. E. Thurston and Miss Bartholomew of Amherst; 
W. S. Regan and Miss Gilmore of Mt. Holyoke ; 
R. D. Whitmarsh and Miss Lane of Smith; S. L. 
Davenport and Miss Hull of Mt. Holyoke; A.J. 
Farley and Miss Valentine of Smith ; W. F. Farley 
and Miss Powers of Smith j J. A. Hyslop and Miss 
Price of Smith ; R. E. Cutting and Miss Harlow of 
Amherst ; Lloyd Chapman and Miss Wodsworth of 
Hadley ; P. H. Smith and Mrs. Smith of Amherst; 
W R. Clarke and Miss Pratt of Mt Holyoke; L. C. 
Brown and Miss Steele of Mt. Holyoke ; R. E. Annis 
and Miss Lovitt of Ware; R.H.Allen and Miss 
Croston of Smith ; L. S. Dickinson and Miss Morgan 
of Amherst ; S. P. Brooks and Miss Graham of Mt. 



Holyoke ; C. W. Stockwell and Miss Parsons of No. 
Amherst': R. L. Whitney and Miss Mac Gregor of 
Mt. Holyoke; I. B. Lipman and Miss L. Parent of 
Northampton ; Walter F. Woodward and Miss G. L. 
Knapp of Northampton; L. Orr and Miss Orr of Mt. 
Holyoke. 



(Cmmars. 



A TRIBUTE. 

The following tribute to the memory of Merritt I. 
Wheeler was presented to the faculty by Prof. W. 
R. Brooks In faculty meeting, and was approved by 
that body in the hature of resolutions. 

"In the death of Merritt I. Wheeler the college 
loses a long time friend and an earnest worker for 
her wellfare. A trustee from 1890 to the time of 
his death, Mr. Wheeler had become thoroughly fam- 
iliar with the institution and its needs ; and though 
with characteristic modesty he insisted that, coming 
from the farm and without other than a common 
school education, he was fitted for service only on 
the Committee on the Farm and Horticultural Depart- 
ments, his opinion and judgment on all matters affect- 
ing the welfare of the institution were highly valued 
by his colleagues and by all who knew him. A man 
of sterling worth and strength of character, and a 
farmer throughout his entire life, Mr. Wheeler was 
especially fitted both by nature and experience to 
bring the college into touch with the common people 
of the rural communities. Respected and looked 
up to by those who knew him, believing in the college 
and in the value of its work, he made others respect 
and look to it for inspiration and guidance. 

Through a dear son who attended the college, and 
who, like all students, came to hold it and its beauti- 
ful sorroundlngs In precious memory, and in whose 
subsequent early death the father so deeply suffered, 
Mr Wheeler came to look upon the instltitution as it 
is eiven to but few who have not been within its walls 
as boys to see it. As he felt his boy would have him 
do he served the college with the zeal and faithful- 
ness of a son. His was therfore much more than 
task-service ; it was a service spontaneously, joyfully, 
even thankfully rendered. 

It has been said that the best product of our New 
England farms is men ; Mr. Wheeler was one of 
these men. He partook of the characteristics of the 
rugged hills amid which he lived, and like the ever- 
lasting 



nil's 



s annu wmv.11 »• •■»— , — ■- 

he will live in the memory of those' who 



knew him. : 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 

The meeting April 23 was addressed by J. H. 
Robinson, Editor of Farm Poultry. The subject of 
the meeting was "Relations of College and Poultry 
Culture." Mr. Robinson graduated from an 
academic institution but has since realized that with 
most business men a little Greek and Latin go a good 
way. The speaker wished to impress upon us that 
poultry keeping on a small scale and poultry keeping 
on a large scale were two utterly different propositions. 
From the information given we ascertained that like 
the "model dairy" it is hard to find a "model poultry 
plant" which is run on a practical basis. Mr. Robin- 
son informed us that in his opinion Rhode Island is 
the most typical poultry portion of the country. The 
Rhode Island methods were explained and the "colony 
system" of that state was described very fully. The 
speaker showed that the colony system is Inexpensive 
and yet very practical in proper latitudes and doubtless 
modifications of this system would be valuable for our 
state. 

He showed us that the intensive methods of poultry 
culture as generally practised have not proved success- 
ful to any great degree, if not a complete failure. Mr. 
Robinson advises us to familiarize ourselves with the 
"colony system" of Rhode Island before we invest in 
scratchers. The questions of fertility, heredity and 
feeding were discussed to some extent and mention 
was made of the great fields of investigation which 
exist concerning these questions and the value of col- 
lege training for such work. 

At the meeting April 16, George Paige, '08, read 
a carefully prepared paper on the Strawberry. The 
localites of which this berry is a native were mentioned 
and reference was made as to how it received its 
name. The sort of soil was given due consideration, 
great stress being laid on the importance of rich and 
well drained land. Means of propagating the plant 
were given. It was stated that the old method of 
obtaining plants from the fruiting beds had given way 
to the establishment of propagating beds apart from 
the fruiting beds. The advantages of home grown 
plants over those shipped great distances were 
mentioned. The following systems of planting were 



given and described briefly : the Matted row, the 
Hedge row, the Double Hedge row, the Modified 
matted row and the Hill System. 

Reference was made as to the importance and 
value to the grower to be able to recognize the staml- 
nate and the pistillate varieties. He stated that in 
planting pistillate varieties every third or fourth row 
should be a pollen bearing kind. Due attention was 
given to the matter of mulching, a practise in vogue 
among all successful growers of this delicious berry. 
The advantages of mulching and the best mulch 
materials were given. The fungous diseases and 
insect pests were considered, and either Bordeaux 
mixture or Paris Creen were recommended for appli- 
cation in such cases. Lastly, the matter of market- 
ing was taken up and dwelt upon to considerable 
extent and valuable suggestions were given as to pre- 
paring the fruit for market. 

Y. M. C. A. 

On Thursday evening, April 18, the regular weekly 
meeting was conducted by E. G. Bartlett, '07, who 
chose as a text the well-known verse in Matthew 
"But seek ye first the kingdom of God and his right- 
eousness and all these things shall be added unto 
you." The speaker sought to show how and on 
what conditions "these things" are added unto us. 
Among the many thoughts expressed Mr. Bartlett 
emphasized the fact that in order to make the great- 
est success of life we must remember that "money Is 
not the sole object." He showed how character is a 
power in the business world. He reminded us that 
life is what we make it and that there Is no limit to 
possibilities. He also demonstrated the fact that the 
successful men of the world never loose sight of the 
following motto, "I will find a way or make one." 

At the meeting April 25, F. A. Cutter, '07, spoke 
on the benefits of Y. M. C. A. outside of college. 
Mr. Cutter was well able to speak on this subject as 
in his experiences he has come In contact with various 
Y. M. C. A's. He said that the Y. M. C. A. is a 
universal fraternity with a constitution founded on the 
Bible. He told of the welcome which a man finds In 
the Y. M. C. A. when he is otherwise a stranger in 
a community. One fact worth remembering is that 
the acquaintances which one makes In the Y.M.C. A. 
are generally worth while, and the number of these 



ifi 4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



105 



newly acquired friends is generally unlimited. Every 
one is always welcome at Y. M.C. A. meetings wherever 
they are held, and these are always beneficial and 
usually interesting as topics of the day are generally 
discussed. Mr. Cutter told of the mighty influence 
which the Y. M. C. A. exerts on young men and boys 
who are often brought under the influence of libraries 
and gymnasiums at an early age. May we all stand 
firmly by the Y. M. C. A, 



D*p&rtm{ivf (Sloths. 



THE LIBRARY. 
Several new books of interest have been added to 
the library recently among which may be mentioned 
the following : 

Volume 1 of Bailey's Cyclopedia of American 
Agriculture, which is indeedSi monumental work on 
the subject, articles by specialists in the different 
lines have been contributed to the work, among which 
may be mentioned one on Farm Manures by Prof. 
Brooks and one by Prof. Stone on the status of Agri- 
culture in Massachusetts. The work is excellently 
gotten up throughout, the illustrations being especially 
fine. An Experimental Zoology, by Professor Thomas 
H. Morgan of Columbia brings together the results of 
researches In this line, which has been rapidly devel- 
oped in the last fifteen years. The Reptile Book by 
R. L. Ditmars treats in a comprehensive and popular 
manner upon the structure and habits of turtles, lizards, 
snails and other reptiles. The Illustrations, all taken 
from life, are fine. In A Book of English Gardens 
by M. R. Gloag are some very fine colored illus- 
trations of views in the famous gardens of England. 
The Book of Vegetables, by Allen French takes up 
the different vegetables with reference to soil require- 
ments, methods of planting, cultivation, harvesting 
etc., in a manner profitable to the amature gardener. 

HORTICULTURE AND LANDSCAPE 
GARDENING. 

JUNIOR ELECTIVES. 

The following combinations are suggested for the 
junior year for those students who wish to specialize 
in either of the three lines, horticulture, floriculture, 
or landscape gardening. 



Horticulture. 

I II 

Pomology Market Gardening 

Botany Agriculture (Fertilizers) 

Arboriculture Botany 

Agriculture Entomology 

Or the following 

I II 

Pomology Market Gardening 

Chemistry Chemistry 

Agriculture Agriculture (Fertilizers) 

Botany Entomology 

Floriculture. 

I II 

Arboriculture Landscape Gardening 

Landscape Gardening Agriculture (Fertilizers) 

Botany Botany 

Chemistry Entomology 

Landscape Gardening. 

I II 

Landscape Gardening Landscape Gardening 

Engineering Drawing 

Drawing Engineering 

Arboriculture Entomology 
Or the following 
I II 

Landscape Gardening Landscape Gardening 

Arboriculture Drawing 

Drawing Agriculture (Fertilizers) 

Pomology Entomology 

ENTOMOLOGY. 
Clarence E. Hood, '06, has been appointed field 
agent of the department of agriculture, to work on the 
cotton-boll weevil at the Louisiana experiment station. 



Alumni. 



Every alumnus should plan to be at the college 
during Commencement week. 

NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The Sophomore-Senior promenade will be held 
June 18, 1907. For particulars and invitations 
address Gordon R. Fulton, Amherst. 

The editor of the Signal was very much gratified 
to receive the following letter from the secretary of 
the class of 1897. It shows that interest and enthu- 
siasm for the college and its work which is so admir- 
able in a body of loyal alumni. The list of '97 men 
is printed in full. 



Editor College Signal : 

Dear Sir \ — To help Increase the circulation 
and efficiency of the Signal, I am enclosing you a 
list of the members, including some ex-men, of the 
class of '97. Having recently In a circular letter 
spoken of the good qualities of the Signal — and there 
are many — to the members of the class, this seems 
the opportune time to have the paper go before them. 
As class secretary I am desirous of keeping the 
men in touch with the college even more closely 
than they have been kept In the past. 

Yours cordially, 

C. A. Peters. 

Class 1897. 
Allen, H. F., Lafontaine, Kans., teacher. 
Allen, J. W., Northboro, farmer. 

Bartlett, J. L., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 

Wis., instructor meteorolgy. 
Armstrong, H. J., 1033 Railway Exchange, Chicago, 

engineer's office, Santa Fe\ 
Barry, J. M., 552 Tremont St., Boston, real estate, 

manager Boston Auto School. 

Clark, L. F., 1437 Seventh St., Des Moines, la., 
manager Dairy Products House. 

Drew, G. A., Greenwich, Conn., manager Conyor's 

Manor. 
Goessmann, C. I. 

Leavens, G. D., 133-137 Front St., New York city, 

vice-president Coe-Mortlmer Co. 
Norton, C. A., West Lynn, pianos and piano tuning. 
Palmer, C. F., Palo Alto, Cal., teacher Biology, 

Palo Alto High School. 
Smith, P. H., 102 Main St., Amherst, chemist 

Department Foods and Feeding, Experiment 

Station. 
Cheney, L. L., V. M. D., Augusta, Ga., meat and 

milk inspector, health department. 
Emrlch, J. A., Sacramento, Cal., furniture business. 
Peters, C. A., Moscow, Idaho, professor of chemistry, 

University of Idaho. 

Ex- '97. 
Cook, M. E., Shrewsbury, fiorist. Miss Carrie 

E. Harrington was married to Mr. Cook, Sept. 

26, 1906, at Shrewsbury. 



Barclay, F. W., Honesford, Pa., manager of the 
estate of C. A. Griscomb. 

Eddy, J. R., department of interior, Washington, 
D. C. Mr. Eddy left the Zoological Park In 
February, 1905, where he had been for ten years 
in charge of the construction of the grounds, 
and entered the Indian service, being with the 
General Supervisor of Indian Reservations, and 
traveling through Utah, New Mexico and 
California. 

78. — C. O. Lovell is still engaged In the photo- 
graphic supply business with headquarters at Cam- 
bridge. He expects soon to open a new factory for 
the manufacture of the good old fashioned Lovell 
plates so much admired by expert photogaphers a few 
years ago. 

Ex-79. — E. D. Chittenden, with the National 
Fertilizer Co., Bridgeport, Conn., manufacturers of 
Chittenden's complete fertilizers and phosphates, 
importers and dealers In agricultural chemicals. 

'82, — Prof. C. S. Plumb, secretary and treasurer 
of the Ohio Live Stock association, Columbus, 0. 

'82. — Herbert Myrlck, chief stockholder in the 
Phelps Publishing Co. , and editor of the New England 
Homestead Is about to build a fine new concrete build- 
ing for his printing plant. It will be the fnest In the 
East and perhaps the best of its kind in the world. 

'87.— Prof. Edward R. Flint, has moved with the 
State University of Florida from Lake City to Gaines- 
ville, Fla., where several state Institutions are to be 
merged into one. 

Ex-'88. — N. A. Rose, of Fltchburg has bought the 
Beaman farm in North Amherst. 

'90.— Frederick J. Smith, of Brooklyn, N. Y., is 
superintending on a large scale the manufacture of 
insecticides for the Bowker Insecticide Co., corner 
Smith and Huntington Sts., and is a very successful 
experimenter. 

'91.— John B. Hall, Jr., is doing a flourishing 
business In retail coal in Great Barrington. 

'92. _A. T. Beals, photographer, 159 Sixth Ave., 
New York city. 

•92.— The class of '92 will hold its fifteenth reunion 
at Commencement. 






1 66 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



167 



Ex- '92. —George W. Haley, actor and merchant, 
at Stonington, Conn. Mr. Haley has just closed with 
the Volunteer Organist Co. 

'94. —Edwin L. Boardman is a successful farmer 
in Sheffield. 

'94. _A. H. Kirkland has recovered from an 
extremely severe and prolonged attack of typhoid 
fever, and is again at work. 

'94._p ro f. R. E. Smith has just issued his annual 
report as Plant Pathologist of the Experiment Station 
of the University of California. It covers various 
interesting observations and experiments. In some 
of the photographs may be recognized the familiar 
features of H. D. Ingham and T. F. Hunt, '05. 
Professor Smith now has ten assistants and has 
recently been granted two sub-stations in Southern 
California. 

♦93. _F. A. Smith of Ipswich, is in charge of a 
private place, is doing a large landscape work there. 
Farrar and Cummings, '08 have left college for three 
weeks to work with him as foremen in ornamental 
gardening work. 

'95, _A. F. Burgess, 20 John St., Reading. 
' 9 7__The class of '97 will hold its tenth anniver- 
sary reunion at Commencement. 

'99._Melvin H. Pingree has recently left his posi- 
tion as chemist of the Pennsylvania Agricultural 
Experiment Station and has entered the employ, as 
chemist, of the American Agricultural Chemical 
Co., Baltimore, Md. 

'99. —Bernard H.Smith, Appraisers Building, Bos- 
ton, has his hands full of Inspection work in connection 
with the analyses required by the new pure food law. 
'99. —Frederick H. Turner, Great Barrington, has 
a large hardware and masonry supply business and is 
an extensive dealer in all kinds of vehicles. 
'00.— M. A. Campbell. Sangerville, Me. 
'00.— James E. Halligan, head chemist in the 
new laboratory of the Louisiana Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station is doing an extensive work. He is now 
handling 3000 samples of feedstuffs, 1 500 samples of 
fertilizers and 200 samples of Paris G'een besides a 
large amount of miscellaneous work. 

'00.— Dr. A. A. Harmon, Peoria, Ariz. 



'00. At the last session of Congress the sum of 

$10,000 was appropriated for the next fiscal year for 
White Fly investigations in Florida, of which Dr. 
A. W. Morrill is in charge. The headquarters of 
these investigations are in Orlando, Fla. 

'01. Thomas Casey, attorney and c ounsellor-at- 

law, Room 28, 145 Main St., Fitchburg. 

'01. W. R. Pierson, florist of Cromwell, Conn., 

has just returned from a short trip to Bermuda. 

'03.— Ransom W. Morse, private secretary and 
student of administration and finance at the Amos 
Tuck school, Dartmouth college, class 1907. 
'03. — H. C. Bowen, Needham. 
'03.— H. J. Franklin, graduate student at M.A.C. 
and special assistant in entomology at the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, left last 
week for the Cape when he will continue his experi- 
ments begun last year on cranberry insects. He will 
remain on the Cape until October. Address, 
Wareham. 

•04.— The Students' Herald of the Kansas State 
Agricultural college for April 28 contains a first class 
picture of M. F. Ahearn, at present foreman of the 
greenhouse and coach of the K. S. A. C. athletic 
teams. The picture represents Mr. Ahearn in base- 
ball uniform, and is entitled "The Man behind the 



'04.— To F. D. Couden belongs a large share of 
the glory for the winning of a debate between George 
Washington University, Washington, D. C. and 
North Carolina on April 12. The question for dis- 
cussion was: "Resolved, That the ownership and 
operation of interstate railways by the national govern- 
ment would subserve the best interests of the people 
of the United States." Messrs Couden and Hin- 
den, both of second year law, defended the nega- 
tive, and clearly excelled their opponents both in argu- 
ment and delivery. George Washington university 
has 1,318 students; of these 75 are graduate, 499 
undergraduate and 744 professional students. During 
the past two and a half years the university has 
engaged in six debates with the best universities, and 
has won them all, so that it now stands with a record 
of having beaten every university it has met on the 
forum. 



'04. — R. R. Raymouth has entered the employ of 
H. R. Cotta, a leading landscape architect of Rock- 
ford, III. 

'05. — Hugh L. Barnes has gone to Hampton, Va., 
to take the place as instructor in horticulture which 
will be vacated by F. A. Bartlett, May I. 

'05. — R. P. Gay is with Munson- Whittaker Com- 
pany, Boston. 

Ex-'05.— A. F. Hoffenreffer Is working in Hoffen- 
reffer's brewery, New London, Conn. 

'05.— Married April 24, at Hopedale, L. S. Wal- 
ker to Miss Lilian Isabella Bates. At home after 
June first. After their return Mr. and Mrs. Walker 
will reside on Phillips St. , Amherst. 

'06. — H. M. Russell, has given up his graduate 
work at M. A. C. to accept an exceptionally fine 
opening with the Bureau of Entomology, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture as special field agent. 
He will begin his work May I. 

Ex- '06. — Stanley F. Morse, Tlahualilo, Durango, 
Mexico, Cia Agricola Industrial, Colonizador Limitada 
del Tlahualilo, S. A. Received degree of B. A. S. 
from the Bussey Institution of Harvard university in 
1906. 

Ex- '06.— Frank A. Ferrin, Box 128, Peabody. 
Since leaving college he studied at the "Amherst" 
and "Whyte" school of Vocal Art receiving the 
degree of B. M. and is now working along lines of 
music specializing in vocal culture. During the year 
1905 he was assistant In German and Mathematics at 
Mt. Pleasant Institute. 

'06. — C. W. Carpenter, Monson, visited college 
recently. 

Ex- '07. —J. G. Curtis, with Beard & Holly, real 
estate, Winnepeg, Man, Canada. 

Ex-'07.— W. L. Curtis, 2537 State St., Chicago, 
III. Graduated from Connecticut Agricultural college 
in class of 1906. 

COMJv(;iC CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

263 Main Strbkt, - • - NORTHAMPTON. 

Everything cooked to order. 



Geo. F. Vester, Jr. 



TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 



C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



485 Main Street, ■ SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 

I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

DyingiClcaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 

All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 

tyrull Dress Suits to rent. awStudents' Clothes bouKht. 



11 Amity Street, Amiikrst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings iB the most stylish and 
best in the market. 




NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 






[68 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






If you want to make 
money this summer 

We have a proposition by which a man can, in three 
months, make more than enough to defray his college 
expenses for the next year. 

There .» no outfit to buy and no catechism which you have to learn. All you need is your own gray 
matter and a little help from us from time to time. 

It yon will write us, we will gladly explain how we 
propose to make your next college year free from 

financial worry. 

The Curtis Publishing Company. 



The Ladies' Home Jounral 
The Saturday Evenino Post 



424 Cherry Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Teaching, 
Business or 
Technical Work ? 



We can Ami you the right opportunity In any line. Over 
1500 young college men satisfactorily placed last year proves 
our ability. Write us today for full particulars of goo«l 
positions open in early summer or fall. A f ew good oppor- 
tunities for summer work. Offices In 12 cities. 

HARGOODS, 

The National Organization of Brain Workers, 

Broadway and Duane St., NEW YORK. 



RaDar's 3»% 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Old South Street, off Main, 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Harap." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS., MAY 15. 1907 



NO. 15 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

notify the Business Manager _ , __ ■ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-ln-Chlef. 

R. H. VERBECK, 1908, Business Manager. 

O B BR1CGS. 1 909, Assistant Business Manager. 

O B. BRIGCS, 1909, Alumni Notes. 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. BROWN JR.. 1909. Alumni Notes, 
j. R. PARKER. 1908. Athtatlc.. / , O0O Semin , rs . 
H. T. WHEELER. 1908, College Notes. ^ Q 
C. H. WH.TE. .909. Special. ^^ 



Terms, $I.OO per qea 



77r^c7~si« 8 i. opi~, loe. Pofy -»««• " "■»*«* — »■ "« C"*"'- ,ac : ^L 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot-Ball Association, 
College Senate. 
Reading- Room Association. 
Basket-ball Association. 



C. H. White. Pres. 
K. E. Cillett. Manager. 
W. C. Peters, Pres. 
J. N. Summers, Sec. 
E. D. Philbrick. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

Base- Bali Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry, Manager. 
R. D. Lull. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Pest Office at Amherst. 



HCdrt&ri&ls. 



The last Informal Dance of the year has come and 
gone, marking the close of that pleasant series of 
social gatherings which has done so much during the 
past year toward rounding out the college life and 
making it complete from a social standpoint. The 
Sophomore-Senior Promenade is of course yet to 
come, but that Is considered more as one of the great 
events than one of those ordinary social occurrences 
which are easily accessible to all. Other colleges 
have their fraternity dances, and we have our college 
dances,— dances which are not only more enjoyable 
but also of more direct college utility than those of 
the fraternity type. A fraternity dance advertises a 
fraternity, and incidentally, perhaps, a college. A 
college dance advertises a college, and all its tradi- 
tions, its ideals, its type of men and type of work. 
The selfishness which may spring from a too conserv- 
ative regard of fraternity and fraternity brotherhood 



gives place to a more generous impulse of college 
loyalty and college brotherhood. The work of the 
Fraternity Conference during the past year has been 
of the highest order in its effort to preserve college 
spirit and to maintain the college social standing. 
College spirit has never been at such high ebb, so 
loyal and generous in its impulses, as during the past 
year; social life has never fared so well, nor been 
entered into so heartily. The success of the year In 
the matter of general wholesomeness of student atti- 
tude is the best possible advertisement of the college 
and its work. In another column we find the signifi- 
cant expression "For in those days we were bad 
kickers." The "kicker" has not entirely disap- 
peared from our ranks,— he still has his bit of wisdom 
for whosoever will listen to him,— but times are infin- 
itely better than they were, even a few years ago. 
Student attitude is In good part dependent upon stu- 
dent relationships. The social dances In the Drill- 
hall have done a great deal toward bettering student 
relationships towards one another, and towards the 
college life as a whole. 








170 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



/Uhlctic NottS- 

BASEBALL. 



In view of reports from Trinity college circulated in 
certain newspapers concerning the non-appearance of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College baseball team 
at the Trinity grounds for the game scheduled for last 
Wednesday, Manager Barry of the Massachusetts 
team wishes to make the following announcement : 
At 6-30 Wednesday morning a telephone call was 
sent in for Manager Barry from Trinity. Mr. Barry 
did not receive the message. At 8-20, as the team 
was about to leave Amherst center for Springfield, 
Manager Barry received another telephone call which 
he answered. The Trinity manager said that it was 
raining in Hartford, and the game would have to be 
cancelled. Manager Barry protested that it was fair 
in Amherst, and the sun would soon be out. The 
Trinity manager stuck to his claim, and said that If 
the Massachusetts team came to Hartford it would 
do so at Its own expense, the guarantee being consid- 
ered void. Upon consultation with Captain Cobb, 
Manager Barry decided to take his team to Spring- 
field and again try to convince the Trinity manager 
from there. A half hour later, as the team passed 
through Northampton, the sun was shining, and an 
hour and a half later, when the team reache d Spring- 
field was still shining. Manager Barry was met in 
Springfield by the following telegram from Hartford : 
"Must cancel game for today on account of wet 
grounds." Signed, W. R. Cross. 

The telegram was received in Springfield at 9- 1 1 , 
and reached Manager Barry at 10-30, and is still in 
his possession. Manager Barry immediately called 
by telephone the Trinity manager, but failed to locate 
him after following the directions of several Trinity 
students. Manager Barry then took his team to the 
Cooley Hotel for dinner, and again sent in a call for 
the manager of the Trinity nine, but again failed to 
locate him at the residence given. In fact, the Hart- 
ford central said there was no such number as Mr. 
Barry was told to call up. The team returned to 
Amherst and held practice upon the campus. Two 
M. A. C. students who had gone with the team as far 
as Springfield continued to Hartford, and found the 
same fair weather conditions there as existed in 



Springfield and Northampton. The Trinity diamond 
was in excellent condition, and the Trinity nine in 
uniform at practice, playing a practice game at 5-00. 
Upon making themselves known, they were led to 
suppose that the Trinity men were awaiting the 
arrival of the Massachusetts nine. Since that day 
Manager Barry has tried at several times to get the 
Trinity manager, but he seems to be a minus quan- 
tity, and will not place himself subject to questioning 
upon the irregular affairs of Wednesday. Consider- 
able indignation is felt at the Agricultural college, 
especially because of reports circulated in certain 
newspapers that the Agricultural College team failed 
to show up. Trinity's actions are more significant in 
that her team has not won a victory as yet, and evi- 
dently does not possess the sympathy of the Trinity 
student body. The last number of the Trinity Tripod 
contains an indignant editorial concerning the unbus- 
inesslike attitude of the members of the college ball 
team. 



S. T. S., 4; M. A. C, 0. 

The team was defeated April 27 by S. T. S. in a 
close game. Cobb was in the box and while his 
opponents got only six hits, costly errors and dume 
playing was sufficient to give Springfield the victory. 
A. G. Johnson pitched a fine game for the Training 
School. Cobb played a fine fielding game in spite of 
two mistakes, as he made eight assists by quick 
handling of short hits. 

In the first inning O'Donnell made a mess of 
Burke's grounder and likewise slipped up on Honhart's 
drive, but both were forced by Johnson and Shean 
after McClaflin had advanced them on a clean hit. 
Messer ran for McClaflin and scored by clever work 
on the bases as Bailey was retired at first. Spring- 
field scored again in the fourth when Shean hit for 
two sacks, stole third and came home on an out at 
first. Two more came in the fifth. Burke singled 
and Honhart got to first on Cobb's wild heave. 
Burke made third and scored on O 'Grady's error. 
Honhart scored on Smith's passed ball. This ended 
the scoring of the game. 

The score : — 



Burke. 3, 
Honhart. I. f.. 
McClaflin, s., 
J. Johnson, 2. 
Shean, m., 
Bailey, r. f., 
Brown, 1 , 
Jones, c. 
A. Johnson, p., 
•Messer. 

Total. 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 

A.B. B. P.O. A. B. 

4 10 1 

4 2 

4 13 2 1 

4 13 5 

4 14 

4 

4 10 1 

3 2 4 2 

3 13 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



171 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



O'Grady. I. f., 
Cobb, p., 
Clark, c, 
O'Donnell s., 
S hat tuck. 2. 
Warner, r. f.. 
Johnson. I , 
Smith, c, 
Bean, 3. 

Total, 

Innings, 
Training Schoo 1 . 



TTS. 
A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 




4 











1 


Knight. 2. 


4 





3 


L 


2 


Morris, r. (., 


4 














R. O'Donnell, 1, 


4 





1 


3 


2 


Reid. p., 


4 


2 


1 


3 





Brown, s., 


4 














Watson, m., 


3 





13 








Schowkowskl, 3, 


3 





6 


2 





Barney. L f., 


3 


2 





1 





Hayden. c, 


33 


4 


24 


17 


5 


Total. 



1 2 
1 C 



4 5 6 7 8 9 
12 —4 



NORWICH. 












A.B. 


B. 




P.O. 




A. B. 


4 












2 1 


4 


1 









1 


4 







12 




2 3 


4 


1 









6 2 


2 







2 




1 2 


3 












1 


3 







2 




1 3 


3 


1 




1 




1 


3 


1 




7 




2 1 


30 


4 




24 




14 15 


1 2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 





1 2 


3 


2 


•» 


6 -18 



34 



27 12 



Runs-Messer. Burke, Honhart, Shean. Total bases— Training School 
7 M. A. C. 5. Stolen bases— Johnson, Shean. Two-base hit— Shean. 
Left on bases-Training School 6 ; M. A. C. 5. Struck out-by Cobb, 
Brown; by A. G. Johnson. Cobb, Smith 2. Bean. Batters hit -Burke. 
O'Grady. Double play-McC'aflin, Johnson and Brown. Passed ball- 
Smith. Time- I h. 40 min. Umpire— Foster. Attendance— 200. 

•Ran for McClaOln in the first and scored. 

M. A. C, 18; Norwich, 0. 
Massachusetts agricultural college defeated Nor- 
wich university in a one-sided game at Amherst Sat- 
urday afternoon, 18 to 0. The visitors had a man 
on third base but twice during the game, and the 
home team was never in danger of being scored upon. 
Cobb displayed great judgment throughout the game, 
having 10 strike-outs to his credit, together with 10 
assists. Hubbard and Smith also put up a fast game. 
For Norwich, Hayden excelled in the field. J. 
O'Donnell scored the first run in the third inning on 
Hubbard's three-base hit to left field. In the next 
inning Bean's two-base hit scored Smith, and Cobb 
sent Bean home. Warner and Smith scored on 
Cobb's three-bagger in the fifth, and Cobb tallied on 
Reid's wild pitch. But two men crossed the plate 
for Massachusetts in the sixth. In the seventh 
O'Grady started with a single, being advanced by 
Knight's fumble of a liner by O'Donnell and then 
went to third on an error by Schowkowski. With three 
men on bases, Hubbard singled, and reached second 
on Morris's misplay, scoring O'Grady, O'Donnell and 
Shattuck. Hubbard later scored on Brown's error of 
Warner's grounder. The eighth was a repetition of 
the seventh. Gobb and O'Grady singled, and a pass 
and an error scored three runs. Shattuck scored on 
Hubbard's single, and Hubbard on Clark's two-bagger. 
Clark finished the scoring on Warner's hit to Knight. 

The score : — 



Innings. 
M. A. O. 

Runs— Cobb 2. O'Grady 2. J. F. O'Donnell 3, Shattuck 3. Hubbard 2. 
Clark 2. Warner, Smith 2. Bean. Sacrifice hits-Shattuck. Bean. Brown. 
Stolen bases-O'Grady 2. J. F. O'Donnell. Warner. Smith. Schowkowskl. 
Bamey. Two-base hit— Bean. Three-base hits— Hubbard. Cobb, Clark. 
First base on bal's-Smlth 2. Clark. Warner. J. F. O'Donnell, Brown. 
Struck out— Knight 2, R. O'Donnell. Barney 2, Hayden. Reld, Brown. 
Watson. Schowkowski. O'Grady. Hubbard. Clark. Warner, Smith. Double 
play-Cobb to Shattuck to Hubbard. Passed balls-Smith. Hayden 3. 
Wild pitch— Reid. Time— 1 h. 30 m. Umpire— P. Foley. Attendance— 
500. 



INFORMAL DANCE. 



M. A. C. 



Cobb, p., 
O Grady. I. f.. 
J. O'Donnell. s.. 
Shattuck. 2. 
Hubbard, I . 
Clark, m., 
Watner, r. f., 
Smith, c. 
Bean, 3, 

Total, 



A.B. 

7 
6 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
4 
5 

48 



3 
2 

1 


3 
2 
1 


2 

14 



P.O. 

2 


4 
12 


9 


27 



A. 

10 


1 

2 





1 
I 

15 



The last Informal Dance of the season was held in 
the Drill-hall Saturday afternoon and evening, May 1 1 . 
From every point of view the dance was probably the 
most successful one which has been held this year. 
Between seventy and seventy-five couples attended, 
as many couples as have probably been on the Drill- 
hall floor at one time before. A special effort was 
made by the committee in the matter of decorations, 
and the display of banners from colleges all over New 
England, intermingled with innumerable Massachusetts 
banners, was bright and attractive. The south-east 
corner of the floor was arranged with easy chairs and 
card table for the patronesses, the corner being banked 
and flanked with palms and plants, and the floor 
spread with a rug. The orchestra's stand was placed 
in the middle of the floor, a little to the north of the 
center of the hall, and was flanked on all sides with 
a tasty display of plants from the Durfee Plant-houses. 
The rest of the floor was kept open in order to accom- 
modate the many couples who attended the dance. 
Chairs were arranged along all sides of the floor. The 
music was furnished as usual by Derrick's Westfield 
Orchestra, and was exceptionally good, though per- 
haps somewhat hurried in the last half because of 
time lost in beginning the dance on account of the 
ball-game with Norwich. The lunch at intermission 
was served at Draper Hall by Mrs. Rowe, eighteen 
tables being set. Again the plant houses were called 
upon for table decorations. Perhaps the only feature 
of the occasion which was lacking was ideal weather 
conditions. The day was not storming, but the air 



1 









i7i 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



was chilly and penetrating, making it much more 
comfortable In-doors than out-of-doors. The weather 
has been so cold this spring that It has been impos- 
sible to throw open the doors of the Drill-hall and use 
the campus for promenading purposes between dances. 
Almost all of the couples arrived on the campus In 
time to see the ball-game with Norwich, which, 
though rather one sided, added considerable excite- 
ment and enjoyment to the afternoon's festivities. 
The patronessess were Mrs. Butterfield, Mrs. Ostran- 
derandMrs. Herrick of Amherst, Mrs. Orcutt of 
Smith and Miss Ferry of Mt. Holyoke. Those who 
brought partners to the dance were : 

j. A. Hyslop, J. R. Parker, K. E. Gillett, H. J. 
Neale, C. R. Webb, E. S. Fulton, P. H. Smith, 
Roy Gasklll, L. S. Walker, F. C. Pray, L. 
R. Heirick, F. C. Peters, C. B. Thompson, F. 
A. Cutter, M. H. Clark, E. H. Shaw, G. H. Chap- 
man, W. F. Turner, D. P. Miller, A. J. Farley, 
F. E. Thurston, S. L. Davenport, E. D. Philbrick, 
R. H. Jackson, L. D. Larsen, L. W. Chapman ,S. 
j. Wright, H. T. Wheeler, T. L. Warner, H. C. 
Chase, L. A. Shattuck, R. H. Verbeck, A. J. An- 
derson, G. R. Cobb, H. M. Jennison, T. F. Waugh, 
W. E. Adams, H. G. Noble, M. W. Thompson, E. 
V. Bennett, H. D. Phelps, P. P. Cardin, R. D. 
Lull, G. R. Fulton, A. W. Hubbard, John Noyes, 
L. S. Corbett, S. C. Brooks, L. S. Dickinson, W. 
W. S. Titus, W. F. Wooodward, J. P. Blaney, W. 
E. Leonard, T. D. McGraw, E. H. Turner, G. B. 
Chase, R. H. Allen, Louis Brandt, R. A. Waldron, 
R. L. Whitney, W. C. Johnson, J. C. Bailey, F. 
A. Prouty. Special guests of the evening were H . 
H. Hill of Darthmouth, E. Thompson of Easthamp- 
ton and Mr. Clark of Norwich. 



College N°**S- 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Whereas, it hath pleased God in His infinite wisdom to 
take unto Himself our beloved friend and brother Walter J. 
Kenney. be it 

Resolved. That we the members of the College Shakes- 
pearean Club do extend to his family our sincere sympathy 
in this their hour of sorrow; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
bereaved family, that a copy be filed in the records of the 
fraternity and that a copy be published in the College Signal. 
Carlton C. Gowdey. 1 
William M. Turner, > For the Fraternity. 
James V. Monahan, ) 



— F. C. Pray, '06, has been visiting college for a 

few days. 

—Company C. consisted of five sergeants and three 
privates the day of the freshman banquet. 

—On Wednesday, May 9, Pres. Butterfield deliv- 
ered an address before the Westfield Grange. 

—Tuesday, May 14, President Butterfield addressed 
the teachers' association meeting at Charlemont. 

—The landscape gardeners of '08 have recently 
prepared planting plans for the Saugus High School 

grounds. 

—Pres. K. L. Butterfield delivered an address, 
Saturday May 1 1 , before the students of the Rhode 
Island state college. 

—Prof. F. A. Waugh addressed the Springfield 
Botanical Society Friday on the subject of " The 
Botany of Cultivated Plants." 

— E. H. Scott, registrar of the Summer school 
has recently made a tour of the college engaging 
furniture for the use of summer school students. 

—Prof. Herrick will give a lecture in the chapel 
Thursday night, immediately after the Y. M. C. A. 
meeting, the subject being "Tangier, the Outpost of 
Barbarism." 

—The Junior class tree was planted Thursday 
night, May 2nd on the lawn south of the veterinary 
building. The tree Is a pin oak of goodly size. The 
usual refreshments were brought or. in a wheel bar- 
row and served when the tree was safe in the ground. 
A marking stone is yet to be procured. 

—The Friday, May 10, session of the tenth annual 
conference of the Eastern Public Education Associa- 
tions, held under the auspices of the Public Education 
Association of Providence, R. I. was given over in 
part to an address by Pres. K. L. Butterfield on the 
"Rural school and the farm community." 

A neat and tasty "General Annoucement of the 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Summer School 
of Agriculture" for 1907 has recently been sent out. 
It contains general information concerning the plans 
of Instruction, the courses offered, the equipment at 
the disposal of the summer school students, and stat- 
istics concerning rooms, board, expenses, etc. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



173 



— The agricultural committee of the Connecticut 
Legislature visited the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Friday May 3rd, and inspected the buildings 
and equipments with reference to appropriations asked 
for by the Storrs Agricultural College of that state. 
They were entertained at dinner In Draper hall by 
members of the faculty. 

— A student mass-meeting was held In the chapel, 
on Friday night, May 3rd, in the interest of football, 
at which "Mat" Bullock, the former star Dartmouth 
end, who has been engaged to coach the football team 
this fall, spoke to the students concerning the pros- 
pects of the team and the manner In which it should 
be supported. Bullock coached the winning eleven 
of 1904. 

— Pres. K. L. Butterfield announces that Pres. C. 
S. Howe, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1878, 
of the Case School of applied science, has been 
secured to deliver the commencement address in 
June. President Howe is one of the prominent gra- 
duates of the college, and considerable gratification is 
felt that such a prominent educator and, at the same 
time, alumnus of the college, has been secured for 
this occasion. 

— The annual Inspection of the cadet battalion by a 
United States army officer took place Tuesday morn- 
ing, April 30th, the announcement being made late 
the night before. The government inspector was 
Captain Michael J. Linnehan of the 25th infantry. 
The assembly was sounded at 9.45, the roll being 
called at 10. Battalion review was first gone through 
with, after which Butt's manual, followed by battalion 
drill, was taken up. 

— The course In bee farming offered by the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, without charge for 
tuition, will begin this year on the 22nd. This course 
continues two weeks. Different members of the 
faculty will lecture on subjects connected with bee 
keeping, and especial attention will be paid to the 
practical operations connected with the industry. All 
students will not only be shown how to handle bees, 
but will be given an opportunity to handle them. 
This work will be under the charge of Burton S. 
Gates of Clark university, who is the president of 
the Worcester county bee keepers' association. Dr. 
E. S. Phillips, the noted specialist of the department 



of agriculture, will give a few lectures, and it Is ex- 
pected that Mr Cary of the firm of W. W. Cary & 
Son, probably the most extensive bee keepers In the 
state, will come for one or more practical talks. 

—Pres. K. L. Butterfield, Prof. F. A. Waugh, Dr. 
G. E. Stone, and Prof. W. P. Brooks represented 
the college interests at a hearing before the Ways and 
Means Committee of the State Legislature last 
Thursday. The hearing was, of course, in the inte- 
rests of the appropriation asked for by the college of 
the legislature. The original appropriation, which 
asks for a sum between seventy and eighty thousand, 
was at first cut down by the Committee on Agriculture 
over one- half, but upon reconsideration was restored 
In full to the sum asked for by the college. It was 
then referred to the Ways and Means Committee, 
and will probably be passed upon by that committee 
in the near future. No conclusions can be drawn 
from the hearing before the committee, as the case 
was simply presented by the representatives of the 
college, and no discussion or opposition took place. 

FRESHMAN BANQUET. 

The class of 1910, Massachusetts Agrlcultujal Col- 
lege, held their first banquet last Thursday night, May 
9th, at "The Wilson" North Adams. 

Although the sophomores had been keeping close 
watch on the 1910 class, especially the president and 
other officers, since the 15th of April, the latter had 
no trouble in leaving town. When the advanced 
French division reported at 9-15 o'clock, all the 
officers were In the recitation room. Here they 
waited for the covered express team from the Horti- 
culture Department, driven by Mr. Dickinson. The 
express wagon was backed up to the Drill Hall door 
and the officers jumped in and were driven down on 
to the Northampton road, where they took a car for 
Northampton. From here they went by train to 
Springfield, thence to Westfield and Pittsfleld. 
From the later city they went to North Adams, where 
they were met by some of the 1910 class and rushed 
into the hotel. 

After the officers had gone, the two divisions of the 
class were told to take a car for Sunderland from the 
lower walk at 10-40. They walked over the river 
to Deerfield, where they took a special car to Green- 
field and from there to North Adams by train. A 











I 



174 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



175 






few of the class went by way of Northampton and 
Greenfield. About 5-30 the class were all gathered 
at the "Wilson," all being on the look out for sopho- 
mores. During the evening fifteen or eighteen came 
into town, some by means of a freight from Green- 
field. About eight o'clock some sophomores tried to 
capture one of the "Ten" men but owing to the work 
of policeman McKane and members of the freshman 
class were not successful. About 8-30 the freshmen 
gathered in the banquet hall for their picture. Then 
followed the banquet, which was very well served and 
all did full justice to it. Before the second course 
was brought on there was a slight disturbance by some 
eggs being thrown through the open windows, but no 
great damage was done. During the rest of the even- 
ing there was no more disturbance. 

Arthur J. Sullivan, chairman of the banquet com- 
mittee, introduced Mr. W.E.Leonard, president of the 
class, as toastmaster, who after a short but interest- 
ing speech called upon F. D. McGraw for "First 
Impressions of College Life— Our Later Ones." 
Next E. H. Turner gave an interesting toast on 1908- 
1910. O. V. T. Urban next spoke on 1910 in the 
Future. R. A. Waldron gave the class a few hints 
on "Fussing, "and A. E. Call spoke on co-education. 
Anti Hazing was W. F. Woodwood's subject. L. S. 
McLaine was the next man scheduled to speak but 
owing to sickness was not able to be present and S. 
S. Smith defended Uph— Uph and Others in a very 
hearty talk. J. P. Blaney and J. C. Drohan amused 
the class with jokes and stories. L. Brandt gave two 
fine solos. The last toast was "Massachusetts" by 
L. S. Dickinson, who gave the class the History of 
the College since he was six years old. The banquet 
ended with yells and the college song "Sons of Old 
Massachusetts." 

The following members of the freshman class were 
present: R. H. Allen, R. E. Annis, J. C. Bailey, 
Bailey, F. S. Beeman, W. H. Bigelowe, J. P. 
Blaney, H. A. Brooks, S. C. Brooks, H. T. Cowles, 

E. F. Damon, L. S. Dickinson, J. C. Drohan, J. N. 
Everson, R. J. Fiske, J. C. Folsom, H. R. Francis, 

F. T. Haynes, M. S. Hazen, A. W. Holland, W. 
C. Johnson, L. E. Leonard, W. E. Leonard, O. P. 
Lipman, F. D. McGraw, H. J. Moore, T. P. Nick- 
less, C. A. Nielson, L. J. Orr, H. A. Partridge, F. 
H. Prouty, A. J. Robb, L. G. Schermerhorn, S. S. 



Smith, C. W. Stockwell, A. J. Sullivan, I. H. 
Thomas, E. H. Turner, O. V. T. Urban, G. M. 
Vinton, R. A. Waldron, W. N. Wallace and W. T. 
Woodward. 



MUSICAL ASSOCIATION CONCERT. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College musical 
association rendered the following program in Stone 
chapel Wednesday night, May 8 ; 

PART I 

1. Overture. Golden Sceptre 
Orchestra 

2. Song. How Can 1 Bear to Leave Thee 
Glee Club 

3. Cornet Solo. Selected 
Albert Short 

4. Two-Step. Dixie Rube 
Mandolin Club 

5. Cello Solo. To the Evening Star Wagner 
George B. Chase 

part 11 

6. Waltz. Kiss of Spring 
Mandolin Club 

7. Cornet Solo. Selected 
Albert Short 

8. Song. When the Little Ones Say Good-night 
Glee Club 

9. Mandolin Solo. Selected 
A. J. Sullivan 

10. Overture. Selected 

Band 

The musical association was assisted by Albert Short, 
cornetist, of Holyoke. Mr. Short's selections were 
especially appreciated. The whole program was ex- 
cellently rendered, and reflects great credit upon those 
who have been endeavoring to make the musical as- 
sociation a success. 



A FEW REMINISCENCES. 

The editor takes great pleasure in presenting to 
the readers of the Signal a few quaint reminiscences 
which have recently come to his hands concerning 
the early days of the college. They were prepared 
by the historian in connection with the twenty-first 
annual reunion of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College Club of New York, held Dec. 7, 1906, as 
recorded in No. 6 of the present volume of the 
Sicnal, The historian's manuscript is as follows : 

As no stenographic notes of the speeches were 
taken, a verbatim account cannot be furnished, and 



it seems fitting to the historian, a member of the 
12th graduating class, who used to look upon the men 
of '71, '72, 73, '74 and '75 as venerable, and now 
finds himself getting into their class, that a few remi- 
niscences and reflections are In order. 

The members of the class of 1882 were under the 
administration of four presidents : Clark, Flint, Stock- 
bride and Chadbourne. The physical equipment of 
the college in 1878, was comprised in two brick dor- 
mitories, one wooden chapel, also used for chemistry, 
mathematics, physics, drill hall and gymnasium ; one 
wooden building for instruction in botany and horticul- 
ture, one plant house, and the first of the farm barns 
and adjoining farm house. At the north was an old 
barn used for the famous sorghum experiments, and 
south of Professor Stockbridge's house, across the 
road, was his lysimetre. Now all this was not only a 
small equipment, but in 1 879 the legislature appro- 
priated $32,000 to pay the debts of the college and 
made the trustees personally liable for any obligations 
thereafter incurred in excess of the income of the 
college. In June the trustees sold the blooded stock, 
excepting the Ayrshire herd, and it was not till May 
12, 1882 that we find the legislature appropriating 
$9,000 for repairs and a drill hall. In those days we 
drilled in winter time in the gymnasum. Dear Dr. 
Goessmann always left the doors open in his labora- 
tory so that he might beat a speedy retreat to the 
open. A senior, I had called the attention of Lieu- 
tenant Bridgman to the widening crack between the 
floor and the walls; he thanked me, and shortly a 
committee of the leglislature came up to look over 
things. They were given an exhibition drill in the 
"gym"; the commandant did not use the whole 
battalion and consequently we senior privates stood 
around to watch the under-classmen manouvre. I do 
not believe that Lieutenant Bridgman, before or 
since, whether In action in the Philippines or else- 
where, ever put his command through a sharper per- 
formance. Near me were standing some of the 
legislative committee ; the building rocked as never 
before, and the inspiration came to me to call the 
attention of one good old man to the opening and 
closing crack as the drill went on. He looked, turned 
white, and got out as quickly as possible ; and thus a 
kicking senior (for we were bad kickers In those days), 
unwittingly perhaps, caused some good. At any 



rate, the time had come for the State to either look 
out for its child or let it die, and I am very much of 
the opinion that Lieutenant Brldgman's forcible dem- 
onstration of the unworthlness of the building started 
things, and I should add that from the time I called 
his attention to the widening crack until this exhibi- 
tion drill, we had not drilled in said "gym" and did 
not again. 

Let us look briefly into the personnel of the presi- 
dents : Dr. Chadbourne largely laid out the plan of the 
college as well as of the University of Wisconsin. 
He occupied the chair but one year '66- '67, coming 
back in 1882 to hold it again for a year, dying in 1883 
while In office. He was an organizer, student, writer 
and teacher of the highest order. Eighty-two had 
the good fortune to receive three months of personal 
instruction by him. Of dignity complete, he was yet 
most companionable. He had not been on the col 
lege grounds twenty-four hours, when we knew there 
was a disciplinarian who would brook nothing. Com- 
ing into chapel unexpectedly one morning, he ran up 
against a big senior who was kicking a hockey stick 
round the floor, and asked him if he did not think It 
was time to put away childish things. They were 
put away. His sermons were listened to with the 
closest interest. His senior classes In mental moral 
and social science were fully attended, and there was 
no need of keeping a roll. Some of his sayings were 
"Young men, I have taught this subject many years, 
and was twenty years preparing to write my book on 
it ; yet I never come before a class without prepara- 
tion ;" "If I am to address a group of twenty obscure 
farmers who will never be known outside of their 
home town, I always prepare myself, for they deserve 
my best." Watching the test of a spring tooth har- 
row, he said "That Is like a wise man ; when it meets 
an obstacle, it goes over It." As to oratory "The 
sermon I preach to you Sunday, you can read In ten 
minutes or less ; proper delivery requires twenty min- 
utes. Do not spoil what you are to say by haste." 

Colonel Clark succeeded Dr. Chadbourne. 1867, 
and resigned in the spring of 1879; scholar, soldier, 
pedagogue and man, he was beloved by all under 
him. He took the closest Interest In the welfare of 
his students. One man going to him for excuse 
from a certain course (they had no electives in our 
day) on the ground that he would not need the Infor- 



I 






ij6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



mation In his life work was advised by the president 
to take it up ; the advice was followed ; the student 
was valedictorian of his class and within two years of 
his graduation he occupied a position which a grad- 
uate of a distinguished university could not fill. 
Another man went to see him, also for some peda- 
gogic advice ; the president advised and then asked 
him what was the matter with his health. The student 
did not think anything wrong, but cross-questioning 
revealed that because of straitened finances he was 
living practically on oat-meal and water. He was 
told to run in debt and eat proper food, which he did, 
though the mischief had been partly done, and the 
man for years afterwards suffered from his limited 
student day diet. It was Clark who brought Goess- 
mann to Amherst ; they had been fellow students at 
Goottingen. It is no disparagement to the other 
strong men who have been connected with the college 
to say that Goessmann has done more work in pure 
and applied science in relation to agriculture than 
any others. If Clark had done no more than bring 
him to Amherst, he had done an untold good. And 
Clark did much himself as to adminstration, original 
work and teaching. The Imperial College of Agri- 
culture in Japan was organized by him ; presidential 
elector and secretary of the electoral college in 1864 ; 
member of the legislature for several terms ; an 
active man in all the good affairs of the town and 
county. He was a splendid specimen of the type pro- 
duced by old time classical training with the addition 
of the German scientific methods. He had to take 
on the tremendous task of pushing to the front the 
value of teaching the pure and applied sciences, 
especially as relating to Agriculture. That he 
resigned in 1879, a disappointed man, is the saddest 
thing in the history of the institution ; whether any 
one is to blame, I say not. The trustees had their 
burdens. Schools fitting for college courses were 
filled with teachers who were graduates of classical 
institutions and who worked against M. A. C. We 
were called "Aggies," "potato diggers," etc., etc. 
Clark was called visionary, and some said they knew 
not where to find him. Yes he did see visions; he 
had imagination, and but for him many beside 
myself would not have had the opportunity of the edu- 
cation given by M. A. C, for Clark, by widespread 
advertising during the summer of 1878 of the college 



and its new system of scholarships, gathered a class 
of over 80 in the fall, and '82, the first "charity" 
class as our dearly beloved brethren of '81 kindly 
called us, graduated 32 men In June, 1882, and 
'81 had ten of our class to swell their numbers to 
eighteen. The "charity" classes, recommencing in 
the fall of 1873, became permanent. 

Charles L. Flint, secretary of agriculture for many 
years, succeeded President Clark. Courtly gentle- 
man and devoted to the agricultural Interests of the 
state, we saw little of him, as he resided in Boston. 
The students went about their work of redeeming 
swamp lands and of study, gave Amherst a jolt In foot- 
ball in the fall of '79, and incidentally did a lot of 
kicking. Levi Stockbridge became president in the 
spring of 1 880. This old war horse In agriculture 
and politics stands out very clearly in the minds of all 
the men of the older classes. My knowledge of 
agriculture is probably as limited as the rest of the 
men who did not go into the "most ancient and 
noble of callings" and I am Informed that Levi 
Stockbridge is now a back number ; that it Is all 
scienced now. That he was a practical man is 
gravely admitted, and that was all. Perhaps so, but 
Levi Stockbridge 's influence as a teacher of practi- 
cal things has been far reaching. Those that heard 
his address in 1897 will not soon forget the force, 
logical reasoning and good common sense with which 
he pleaded, yes stormed, for more practical things, 
and successfully, because peace settled down on the 
institution which had been in a state of unrest. 
There never was a time when his clear aphorism 
"Any occupation that is honest is honorable" was 
more needed through the whole country than now. 
As an administrator of the collegiate affairs of about 
one hundred discontented students, he was not wholly 
a success ; I look back with shame on some of the 
things I was guilty of, and I have good company — 
lots of it. I have called attention to the limited 
equipment, and that no buildings were added till after 
we were graduated. For a time we received ten 
cents an hour for class work in the field, but that was 
soon cut off. Social affairs naturally languished after 
Clark's resignation, because of Flint's life in Boston; 
Stockbridge did his best in this line, holding recep- 
tions occasionally in his house, which would be so full 
that we would literally be sticking out of the windows. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



177 



Cranky kickers of course we were, and perhaps no 
man could have held us better together than Stock- 
bridge did, and by the time the new personality of 
Chadbourne, already noted in its effects, came on the 
field, I think we were all pretty well tired out and 
ready to be good. "Old Stock" was a strong man 
and a big man, who conferred great benefits on the 
institution and was its president in the most trying 
period of its history ; his name will long be honored ! 

Goodell's long incumbency the more recent classes 
as well as the older alumni know of well ; he wrought 
for great things successfully, and his record Is plain 
and lasting. 

We now have a man at the helm who is neither 
young or old ; who has had to the full the more mod- 
ern intensive and extensive training, undergraduate 
and post-graduate, besides a broad experience in 
pedagogic and administrative work ; his appreciation 
of the work of his founder predecessors is full and just. 
The functions of the college in relation to its students, 
the agricultural interests and the whole people of the 
state, he has the right concept of. That he sees 
visions as Clark did I have no doubt ; and that he will 
administer the duties that daily will come before him, 
even more acceptably than any of his predecess- 
ors, because he has greater opportunity, Is my 

expectation. 

John A. Cutter, M. D., New York. 



Seminars. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB. 

At the meeting April 30, H. F. Thompson, in con- 
junction with Professor Waugh gave a very instructive 
stereopticon lecture on "Market Gardening in Massa- 
chusetts." Mr. Thompson, who has been with us 
as Instructor in Market Gardening but a few months 
is doing much toward bulding up this important branch 
of horticulture in M. A. C. 

Methods of tillage, kinds of crops and handling of 
crops were developed quite extensively. Many of the 
slides showed how double cropping was practised suc- 
cessfully with various kinds of garden truck. 

The slides shown were prepared by Professor 
Waugh from photographs of active operations in the 
market garden department of M. A. C. and truck 
gardens in the vicinity of Boston. 



The lecture was given in Wilder Hall and was well 
attended. 

On Tuesday, May 7, Dr. H. W. Field, chairman 
of the Massachusetts Fish and Game Commission 
spoke before the club on "The work of the Fish and 
Game Commission for the farmers." He first told 
of the shell fish Industry along the coast, the raising 
and planting of young clams and oysters and the 
opportunities which "marine farming" offered. 
Next the lobster was discussed and changes and 
Improvements In the present laws governing lobster 
fisheries were suggested. 

The protection of our native song birds was next 
touched upon and this was followed by an Interesting 
discussion on game birds ; quail, grouse and prarie 
chicken. He said that every farm should have Its 
flock of quail as well as its poultry because they would 
be of so much importance in keeping down injurious 
insects. In regard to the fox and rabbit he regarded 
it as an open question whether their value to the 
sportsman outweighs the damage they do, and if the 
fox did not do enough good in keeping down tield 
mice to make the taking of an occasional chicken 
excusable. The work of hawks and owls in keeping 
down mice was also spoken of. 

The talk ended with a discussion of the deer problem 
in the western parts of the state and the laws govern- 
ing the killing of deer. Those attending were well 
repaid for it was one of the most Instructive and inter- 
esting talks of the year. 

Y. M. C. A. 

On Thursday evening, May 2, the regular meeting 
was conducted by Mr. Jacks, the General Secretary 
of the Hartford Y. M. C. A. The topic was "Shall 
I Drink ? " Mr. Jacks who has been connected with 
the very flourishing organization at Hartford for some 
time has had much experience with men of all classes 
and ages and has watched and studied the lives of 
many men who have decided the question. A man- 
dolin solo was given by Sullivan, 1910. 

May 9, Mr. William Macpherson, Physical 
Director of the Y. M. C. A. at Northampton, spoke 
to us on the subject "Our Body." His text was 
from St. John II, the 21st verse "But he spoke of 
the temple of his body." Several generations ago It 
was considered by many people that in order to make 
the greatest success in the world one must not think 







I 






178 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



too much about the body but should train the mind 
as much as possible at any expense to the body. We 
who live in the twentieth century should be thankful 
that we live in an age when it is recognized by all 
modern philanthropists that we cannot have sound 
minds and spirits without sound bodies. 

In these times people often wonder why there is 
such need of physical culture when our forefathers 
were so often such rugged men and yet never 
"trained." Mr. Macpherson explained very vividly 
why the young men of today need to give more thought 
to their bodies. He told how the great industrial 
revolutions were crushing the physical basis of young 
manhood In so many cities. 

The effects of so many modern conveniences which 
are anything but condusive to normal physical develop- 
ment were described. In short if we lead an artificial 
life we should take artificial exercise, but this Is where 
we fail to do duty by ourselves and consequently the 
business for so many physicians. 

In closing the speaker said that "the thing the young 
man today needs is more Interest in the care of his 
physical body." 



Alumni. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The Sophomore-Senior promenade will be held 
June 18. For particulars and invitations address, 
Gordon R. Fulton, Amherst. 



The Western Alumni Association of M. A. C. 
will hold its annual reunion and banquet on May 25 
at 6 p. m. at the University club, 1 16 Dearborn St., 
Chicago, HI. Pres. Kenyon L. Butterfield has 
kindly arranged to be with us on that evening, and it 
is hoped that every alumnus who can possibly do so, 
will make it a point to be present to give the Presi- 
dent a rousing welcome. 

The banquet will be $3.00 per plate, and accept- 
ances should reach us not later than May 23. 

A. B. Smith, 

322 Fifth Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 



'81 and '90.— Profs. J. L. Hills and C. H.Jones, 
director and chemist respectively of the Vermont 
Agricultural Experiment Station, at Burlington, have 
completed the analysis for protein content of 125 
samples of commercial feeding stuffs collected in the 
state during last November and the results of their 
work have been compiled in Bulletin No. 125 of that 
station. 

'82.— James S. Williams, president and general 
manager of the Williams Brothers Manufacturing 
Co., Glastonbury, Conn. 

'90.— C. H. Jones of Burlington, Vt., expects to 
obtain his M. S. degree from Vermout university this 
Commencement. 

•91._We have received with pleasure the follow- 
ing Information from Secretary Walter A. Brown of 
the class of '91 : 

Frank L. Arnold Is superintendent of the Sulphuric 
Acid Department of the Merrimac Chemical Co., 
North Woburn. Residence 32 School St. Mem- 
ber of the American Chemical society and the society 
of Chemical Industry. He has two children, a son 
and a daughter. 

Brown, Carpenter, Magill and Russell (ex- '91.) 
also have families of this size and description. 

Henry M. Howard, market gardener of West 
Newton, has the largest family, having made a begin- 
ning with about half a dozen girls. He is making a 
grand success In the matter of raising girls, garden 
truck, and violets for the Boston market. 

M. A. Carpenter, forester and landscape gardener 
on a large estate in Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

A. G. Eames, the only bachelor of '91, Is doing 
literary work at his home in North Wilmington, and 
writing a book which will give a comprehensive 
account of his travels and vicissitudes in the far East. 

L. F. Horner, In addition to being superintendent 
of the Mrs. C. H. McCormick estate at Monte Cito, 
Cat., is manager of the Cinquefoil Water Co., pres- 
ident of the Santa Barbara County Horticultural 
society and secretary of the Monte Clto Hall and 
Library association. He is also In the field as land- 
scape designer and is a member of the Santa Barbara 
Nursery Co. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



179 



Arthur H. Sawyer, cement inspector, 98 Hudson 
St., Jersey City, N. J., has two sons. 

E. E. Russell (ex- '91), 17 Bellevue St., Worces- 
ter, has been making a specialty of steam engineer- 
ing. He is employed by the American Steel and 
Wire Co. 

Walter A. Brown has resigned his position as first 
assistant city engineer, Springfield, after fifteen years 
In municipal engineering, to take up private practice 
with the firm of J. K. Barker, 332 Main St., 
Springfield. Messrs. Barker and Brown have just 
purchased a majority of the stock of the Clapp & 
Abercromble Co. of Greenfield. C. W. Clapp, '86, 
was one of organizers of this corporation and for the 
past ten years this has been the principal engineering 
firm in Franklin county. J. K. Barker, an ex- 
member of the same class and a graduate of Illinois 
university, now becomes president of company, and 
Mr. Brown, treasurer and engineer, while Mr. Clapp 
retains the financial interest in the concern and will 
make Its office his headquarters when In Greenfield. 

'94. — Charles L. Brown is about to build an addi- 
tion to his laundry in Springfield. It will be of 
cement and brick, 24 by 55 feet, and provide room 
for new boilers and the department of family washing. 
>94._A. H. Kirkland, superintendent of the 
Gypsy Moth Commission recently paid a short visit 
to Prof. C. H. Fernald, with *hom he studied in 
entomology. 

•94.— Born in Atlanta Ga., April 28, a son, 
James Baxter, to Mr. and Mrs. Ellas D. White, 
283 Lawton St. 

'94. — C. P. Lounsbury, government entomologist 
of Cape Town, Cape of Good Hope, Africa, is 
spending some time in this country. He will attend 
commencement exercises here. His present address 
is 66 Mont Claire Ave., Roslindale. 

'94. — The class of 1894 will have a reunion at 
commencement, and the following men have already 
signified their Intention of being present : T. S. 
Bacon, L. M. Barker, C, L. Brown, A. H. Cutter, 
E. T. Dickinson, S. F. Howard, A. H. Kirkland, C. 
P. Lounsbury and A. J. Morse. 

'97. — The following corrections are made In the 
list of '97 published in the last Issue : H. J. Arm- 
strong, instructor in civil engineering Armour Institute 



of Technology, Chicago, 111., home address, 11342 
Fairfield Ave., Morgan Park, 111. Charles I. Goess- 
mann, 925 Quincy Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

'97. — George A. Drew of Greenwich, Conn., will 
be married May 21 to Miss Rachel Bancroft Brooks 
of Amherst. 

'99. — w. A. Hooker, special field agent of the 
Bureau of Entomology, has just published a bulletin 
on "The Tobacco Thrips, a new and destructive 
Enemy of Shade-grown Tobacco. " 

'00. — Dr. Austin W. Morrill has recently published 
Bulletin 64, Part I, Bureau of Entomology on "The 
Mexican Condurda in Western Texas In 1905." 

'02. — We have at hand two excellent bulletins of 
the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station : one 
entitled "The Apple from Orchard to Market," the 
other "Orchard Management." The former is by 
C. I. Lewis, horticulturist of the station, and Is a 
very careful treatise of the handling of the apple. 
The latter is by C. I. Lewis in conjunction with W. 
H. Wicks, assistant, and handles well Its subject. 

'02. — Ransom W. Morse has just finished his 
course in administration and finance at the Amos 
Tuck school, Dartmouth college, and has taken the 
position of business manager of the Fall River 
Herald. 

'04. — A. L. Peck is acting as foreman In eutslde 
work at the horticultural department M. A. C. 

'04. — F. J. Henshaw leaves the last of this month 
for Seattle, Wash, and as soon as navigation opens 
up he will leave for Cape Nome, Alaska, where he 
will be engaged in the U. S. Geological Survey. 

'05. — The state of New Hampshire has become 
alarmed over the Invasion of the gipsy moth, and 
the last legislature in that state appropriated $25,000 
for fighting the pest. The work is to be done by 
contract and the entire job has been awarded to the 
Munson-Whitaker Co. 

'05. — Walter B. Hatch has been made assistant 
superintendent of parks of Hartford. 

'06.— F. C. Pray is visiting college for a few 
days. During the last five months Mr. Pray has 
been engaged as sugar chemist on the Soledad estate, 
Bellmonte, Cuba. The crops have been very suc- 
cessful their yield being 81,563 bags averaging 340 
pounds to the bag. Mr. Pray is going West In the 



I 



p 

■— - 



i 



1 80 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



beet sugar work in July or August returning to Cuba 
In December. His present address is Natick. 

'06.— C. E. Hood, Box 620, Baton Rouge, La. 

E X . '08. — J. E. Draper, Bloomingdale nurseries, 
Worcester, announces that he will carry on the large 
nursery business which his father established. 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To ikt<: your sole. Come to me (or your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

opposite Town Hall. 



Geo. F. Vester, Jr. 

TAILOR 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying.Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



AND 



DRAPER 



485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 



All orders promptly attended to. 
Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 
Full Dress Suits to rent. «r3tudents' Clothes bought. 



11 Amity Street, Amiiekst, Mass. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 
best in the market. 

NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



Rabar's 3-in, 



Old South Street, off Main, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Broadway and Duane St.. NEW YORK. 

GOOD POSITIONS 
FOR COLLEGE MEN. 

Laat y«ar practically every college man on our lists was 
Disced before September lst-over 1500 in all. Tbe demand 
is «eaterU»ts year, the opportunities better ! One Amherst 
man whom we placed in buslnass three years ago is now 
earning $3000 a year. Shall we _ke up your case with some 
of tbeioTooo employers we serve' Write us today stating 
position desired-teaching, business or technical work. 
Offices In 14 cities. _ 

HARGOODS, 

Tbe National Organization of Brain Workers. 



Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



Go to PLUMB, the Barber, 

For an Eleetric or Air Vibrating Massage, also 
perfect shave, shampoo and hair-cut. 

Opp. Amhkrst House. 



COi^IyBGB CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

263 Main Strket, - - - NORTHAMPTON. 

Everything cooked to order. 

C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 29. 1907 



NO. 16 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student, and Alumni are requested to contributs. Communication, .hould b. addressed. Coll.os S.ohau At. must. Mass. Tlls ml tl 
•snMo all subscriber, until it. discontinuance i. ordered and arrears .re paid. Subscriber, who do no, rece.ve their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. ■ — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 
D. P. MILLER. 1908, Editor-ln-Chlef. 
R. H. VERBECK. 1908. Bu»iness Manager. 
O B BRICGS, 1909, Assistant Business Manager. 
O L CLARK 1908. Department Notes. O. B. BRIGGS. 1909. Alumni Note. 

?R PARKER 1908. Antics. O. « BROWN. JR " '«>•■ Alumni N * M 

„. T. WHEELER, .908. College Note, I ?££* iw 





!^_T.l.oo Per te ar la ad-a ceTstagto Copiee. 10c F of 9 e o.taide ol United State, and Canada, 1*. s_tr_. 



Y. M. C A. 

Foot- Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Reading- Room Association. 
Basket-ball Association, 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



C. H. White. Pres. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
J. N. Summers. Sec. 
E. D. Phllbrick. Mansger. 



Athletic Association. 

Base Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index. 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec 
T. A. Barry, Manage). 
R. D. Lul 1 . Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered ss second-class matter. Pott Office at Amherst. 



Edi"tbri_ls. 



With this issue of the Signal the editor has inten- 
tionally cut out the column which has been devoted 
to Seminars, and made brief notes of the various 
meetings treated therein under College Notes. It has 
seemed to the editors that the column does not attract 
enough interest to warrant giving up so much space, 
space which, at least just now, is sorely needed for 
other matter. Whether we can introduce into the 
Sicnal such articles of general Interest as that found 
in this number is an open question, and one upon 
which we desire the judgement of the readers of the 
Signal. Such articles introduce a little of the out- 
side interest, and yet are obviously enough correlated 
with the college and its work. 



Perhaps the most significant indication of the 
general trend of college sentiment this year is in the 
rulings of the senate in regard to the matter of hazing. 



The senate did not undertake the question without 
first obtaining the sentiment of the two upper classses 
in regard to the matter and finding that in the two 
upper classes hazing in its more violent and unre- 
strained forms was almost unanimously disapproved of , 
the senate drew up the present rulings, submitted 
them for approval to the upper classes, and, upon tne 
students being temporarily absolved from the pledge 
which all are forced to sign upon entrance not to 
haze, put the new rulings into effect, and appointed a 
vigilance committee. That the vigilance committee 
has a hard task before it is only too evident, but we feel 
confident that it will use judgement and unprejudiced 
discretion. For the sake of better performance of 
its duties, the names of the three seniors and two 
juniors on the vigilance committee will not be pub- 
lished ; the sophomore upon that committee is 
chosen by his class, and beyond his own classmates 
his name need not be known. The upperclassmen 
upon the committee are appointed by the senate. 
This committee is to have full charge of any training 
—we can hardly call it hazing— which may be deemed 



I 



> 



1 



I 

I 

I 



182 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



183 



necessary. It may delegate its work, under super- 
vision, to sophomores, but takes the responsibility 
upon its own shoulders. Any infringement of the 
rulings will be hotly resented by the Senate, upper- 
classmen and faculty, and would not be tolerated an 
instant. The Senate represents the crystallized sen- 
timent of the upper classes, and any defiance of its 
rulings by an underclassman would meet with sum- 
mary punishment, in all probability expulsion from 
college. The matter is left with the Senate, and it 
is understood that the Senate means business and 
will not be trifled with. 



MIDDLBBURY. 














A.B. 




•. 


P.O. 




A. 


■■ 


4 




1 


3 










4 







1 







1 


4 







13 







1 


4 







3 




3 


I 


4 












2 


I 


3 















1 


3 







2 










3 




1 


4 




1 


1 


3 







1 




3 





32 




2 


27 




9 


6 


1 2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


3 4 





1 





1 





2-11 


1 

















0— 1 



/Uhletic No**S- 



BASEBALL. 

The baseball team is now playing at its best. 
Fielding has improved and the last few games have 
shown marked increases in the batting averages. 

On the Vermont trip two games were won and two 
were lost, the team going down to defeat twice by the 
crack Vermont team and winning from Norwich and 
Middletown. 

The scores of the Vermont games were 8-1 and 
9-0 respectively. At Norwich Hubbard pitched very 
effectively and the home team was never dangerous. 
The final score was 3-0. 

M. A. C, 11; MlDDLEBURY, 1. 

The game with Middlebury on May 20 was fast 
but mixed up with many errors. Cobb was in fine 
form and held the home team to two hits. The 
Middlebury players played hard but were simply out- 
classed, both in hitting and fielding. Hubbard and 
Warner played a fast game and O 'Grady made a per- 
fect throw home from deep left. 

The score : — 



Cobb. p.. 
O'Grady. 1. 
O'Donnell, s.. 
Hubbard. 1. 
Shattuck, 2. 
Clark, m.. 
Warner, r. f.. 
Bean. 3, 
Smith. C.i 

Total. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
A.B. 
5 

3 
3 
5 
5 

4 
4 
4 
3 



2 


1 
1 

2 
1 




1 



2 
1 
1 
10 
1 


1 



1 1 



4 

2 

J 



1 

1 



36 



27 



11 



Cushman, 1 , 
Duff, m., 
Kilborne. t. 
Bean. s.. 
Holmes, 2, 
Storm. 3, 
Fisher, r. f., 
Harmon, c, 
Cold, p., 

Total, 

Innings, 

Massachusetts, 

Middlebury. 

Stolen passes— Bean 2. First base on balls-off Cobb 1 ; off Cold 2. 
Struck out-by Cobb 1 1 , by Cold 4. Stolen bases-ODonnell 2, Shattuck. 
Smith 2. Sacrifice hits-OGrady 2. Hit by pitched ball-0 Donnell 2, 
Time— I hour. 50 minutes. Umpire— Simpson. 



M. A. C, 10; S. T. S., 3. 

Wednesday the team more than made up for the 
defeat it suffered at the hands of S. T. S. early in the 
season. This time the training school team was 
clearly outclassed being weak at the bat and in the 
field. The game was full of sensational plays. 

In the opening inning the first five Massachusetts 
men singled and netted four runs. After this, the 
Springfield team was never dangerous. During this 
inning, there was some very clever base -running. 
Cobb scored from first on a sharp single by O'Grady 
over the second-base bag, and a little later O'Donnell 
and Hubbard turned in a neat double steal. Bean 
took a hard foul fly in the first inning after a long run. 
In the second Shattuck made a clever stop of aground 
ball between first and second, robbing the batter of a 
hit. Brown made a neat catch on Burke's low throw 
from third base, and Smith did some clever catching 
in the fourth inning. 

In the sixth inning Honhart turned a well-placed 
bunt into a hit by fast running, but he was later caught 
between second and third by Bean. In this inning, 
with two down, Cobb made a two-base hit to deep 
center, scoring two men. Cobb and O'Donnell each 
made fine stops in the seventh. In the eighth a wild 
pitch by A. G. Johnson let in two runs. In the ninth 
Springfield tried hard to rally, but was not equal to the 
occasion, and only scored one run. 

For Massachusetts the best hitting was done by 
Cobb and Hubbard. A. G. Johnson had twelve strike 
outs to his credit. Brown played a good game at 
first and Honhart and Shean did timely hitting. 
The score : — 



Cobb. p.. 
O'Grady. 1. 
O'Donnel, s., 
Hubbard. I, 
Shattuck, 2, 
Clark, m., 
Warner, r. f., 
Bean. 3. 
Smith, c, 

Total. 



Burke, 3. 
Honnart, I, 
McClel'an, s., 
Wright, r. f.. 
J. L. Johnson, 2, 
Shean, m.. 
Bailey, r. s., 
Jones, c, 
Brown. I . 
A. C. Johnson, p., 

Total, 

innings. 
M. A. C. 
Springfield. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



f.O. 



3 
2 

I 

2 

I 








2 


6 

















1 





2 





1 


1 


2 





I 





1 











3 


1 


1 


8 









34 

SPRINGFIEI D. 

A.B. 

4 
3 
3 
1 

4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 



1 
1 




1 
I 


1 





27 



P.O. 


1 





1 



13 

8 

1 



10 



2 



1 



I 


5 



32 



24 



123456789 

4 10 3 2 -10 

00000100 1-2 



Young, s., 
Waters, c , 
Wadsworth, 2, 
Warren, m., 
Harman, 1. 
Lewis, J, 
Osterhout. r. f.. 
KeHey.l. f.. 
Temp'eton, p.. 

Total. 



Cobb, I , 
O'Grady, I. f , 
O'Donnell. 2. 
Hubbard, p., 
Shattuck. 3, 
Clark, m.. 
Warner, r, f.. 
Bean, s., 
Smith, c, 



WILLIAMS. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


4 


1 


2 


1 





3 





4 


2 





4 


1 


3 


1 


1 


4 


2 


1 








4 


2 


11 








4 





3 








4 


2 


2 








3 





1 








4 








4 





— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


34 


8 


27 


8 


t 


MASSACHUSETTS. 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B 


3 





13 








4 


1 


3 








3 








3 





2 


2 





6 





3 








3 





4 


1 


3 








4 


1 


1 








4 


1 


1 





2 


2 





3 


1 






Total. 
Innings, 
Williams. 
Massachusetts 



Runs— Cobb 3, O'Grady, O'Donnell. Hubbard. 2, Clark. Warner. Shat- 
tuck. Burke, J. L. Johnson. Total bases— Massachusetts 10. Spr'ngfield 
5. Sacrifice hits— Clark, Bailey. Stolen bases— O'Donnell, Hubbard 2. 
Warner 2. Cobb. O'Grady. Clark, Wright. Two-base hit -Cobb. First 
base on balls— off Cobb 2. off A. G. Johnson 1 . Left on bases -Massachu- 
setts 5. Springfield 6. Struck out-by Cobb 7, by A.C.Johnson 12. 
Batter hit— Oark 2. Passed ball— Smith. Wild pftch-A. G. Johnson. 
Time 1 hour, 40 minutes. Umpire— Foley of Amherst. 

Williams, 4 ; M. A. C, 2. 

Saturday, Williams defeated M. A. C. at Williams- 
town In the best played game of baseball seen on 
Weston field this season by a score of 4 to 2. The 
visiting players were equipped with the real article and 
were quite a surprise, although it was believed that 
they were a much underrated team, since the ten- 
inning game with Brown had not been forgotten. The 
M. A. C. boys had lots of ginger and made but two 
misplays, while Williams made but one, Wadsworth 
dropping Water's throw in the first. Massachusetts 
made a strong attempt to win in the 9th when Hubbard 
and Warner made singles and Clark a homer, but 
Hubbard was forced out at second and Warner was 
caught napping off first. Williams scored one run in 
the fourth and three more in the eighth. Hubbard 
was effective for the visitors and his fielding was of 
the best. Clark's drive into west field was the first 
home run of the season on Weston field and was the 
equal of any ever seen there. For Williams, Har- 
man, Osterhout and Warren played the best ball, 
while Cobb and Clark played well for M. A. C. 
The score : 



29 6 24 13 2 
123456780 
00010003 —4 
00000000 2—2 

Runs— Wadsworth. Warren, Harman, Lewis. Shattuck. Clark. Sacrifice 
hits. Warren Hubbard, Shattuck. Stolen base-Osterhout. Two-base hit 
-Harman. Home run C'ark. First base on balls by Templeton. Cobb. 
O'Donnell. Smith : by Hubbard, Waters. Kelley. Struck out by Ten-., 
ton. O'Grady 2. Clark, Smith ; by Hubbard. Wadsworth, Warren. Time. 
1 hour. 45 minutes. Umpire— HoweUsof Blackinton. 

BATTING AVERAGES. 







c. 


A.B. 


H. 


PER CENT. 


Cobb. 




14 


57 


16 


.281 


Hubbard. 




11 


33 


9 


.273 


O'Donnell, 




14 


53 


14 


264 


Bean. 




8 


28 


7 


.250 


Shattuck. 




14 


59 


12 


.203 


Warner, 




14 


46 


8 


.174 


O'Grady. 




14 


58 


13 


.172 


Johnson, 




8 


29 


4 


.140 


Clark, 




14 


53 


6 


.113 


Smith. 




14 


45 


3 


.070 




FIELDING 


AVERAGES 








G. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


PER CENT. 


Smith. 


14 


95 


17 


3 


.974 


Cobb. 


14 


49 


50 


5 


.952 


Hubbard. 


11 


38 


26 


4 


.941 


Johnson. 


8 


86 


2 


7 


.926 


Shattuck. 


14 


31 


31 


7 


.899 


Warner, 


14 


13 





2 


.866 


O'Grady. 


14 


16 


4 


4 


.833 


Clark. 


14 


13 


1 


4 


.777 


O'Donnell. 


14 


8 


27 


13 


.730 


Bean. 


8 


7 


5 

^B» 


9 


.571 



TENNIS. 

Interest in tennis was never so keen at M. A. 
C. as it is this year. Every court is occupied all 
through the day, some men even using them at five 



c 



I 



184 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



o'clock in the morning. The inter-fraternity tourna- 
ment this year should be hotly contested and some 
good exhibitions are looked for. Each fraternity will 
enter two men and a tax has been levied which will 
provide for a suitable trophy to be presented to the 
winner of the tournament. The first game will be 
played this week. 

The committee is trying to get each fraternity to 
enter a team for a tournament in doubles. 



MR. F. C. KENNEY. 

Announcement has been made of the appointment 
of F. C. Kenney, at present cashier of Michigan 
Agricultural College, as treasurer of the college. The 
office is at present held by Prof. G. F. Mills, who 
will be relieved of the duties of treasurer next year in 
order that he may take up the new duties of dean and 
professor of humanities. Mr. Kenney is 40 years of 
age, is married, with two children, and will make his 
home in Amherst, becoming a member of the faculty. 
He is peculiarly fitted for the work, having held his 
present position for the last 13 years, where he was 
directly responsible for the proper handling of $700,- 
000 or $800,000 yearly. All student dues pass 
through his hands. He was auditor of the students' 
boarding club association, and rendered exceptional 
service to a local fraternity of which he is a member 
by serving on the house building committee. Besides 
this, many funds outside the college funds passed 
through his hands, as a sort of banking system is 
maintained at Michigan. Mr. Kenney received his 
education at Ferris institute, Michigan, is at present 
a member of the Michigan faculty, and is influential 
in town affairs at Lansing, serving on the school com- 
mittee and holding other public off ices. He will take 
up his new duties at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College July 1 . 



PROF. W. R. HART. 

The committee on course of study and faculty of 
the board of trustees of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College have voted to recommend to the full 
board the election of Prof. W. R. Hart of the Ne- 
braska state normal school, as professor of agricul- 
tural education at the M. A. C. This step 
has been led up to through the founding at the 



college of a department of agricultural education. 
The general purpose of the department will be to 
institute research, and to give instruction to students 
in all those matters which have to do, in general, 
with all the various phases of agricultural education ; 
in particular, with elementary agriculture suitaole for 
teaching in primary and secondary schools, and In- 
cluding such things as school gardens, etc., and with 
those aspects of the rural school problem which are 
of special Interest to rural social betterment. The 
teaching involved will include normal Instruction at 
the college for those students who are preparing to 
to teach in agricultural schools and colleges, and also 
for teachers desiring to prepare specifically for giving 
school garden work and elementary agriculture in the 
primary and secondary schools. 

At the head of such a department is needed a man 
who will deal with technical agricultural education, 
more particularly on its pedagogical side, but includ- 
ing also its sociological and administrative aspects. 
He must study the work of agricultural colleges, agri- 
cultural high schools, the feasibility of agricultural 
courses in high schools and academies, the teaching 
of agriculture in the lower grades of schools, and 
agricultural extension teaching. He should teach in 
the college at least during one semester of the year, 
offering electives for undergraduates and graduate 
students preparing for teaching in any form. He 
should also devote a considerable portion of his time 
to visiting the high schools of Massachusetss, attempt- 
ing thus to get into close touch with high school prin- 
cipals and students. He will make a study of high 
school work as it relates to the courses of study at 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, and he should be 
prepared to assist schools of any grade in formulating 
agricultural teaching. His work will be In the closest 
harmony with the commission on industrial education. 
He will attempt to reach and help teachers of agri- 
culture through teachers associations, etc. He will 
also become an expert adviser of the faculty of the 
college in all matters relating to the pedagogic phases 
of the curriculum. 

Professor Hart has been chosen after long and 
painstaking investigation to institute and carry on this 
work. He is a man about 50 years old, and Is con- 
sidered one of the strongest men in the educational 
work in Nebraska. He spent his boyhood on an Iowa 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



185 



farm and received his education in Iowa Wesleyan 
University of Nebraska. He had his master's degree 
from the latter institution. He has had teaching 
experience in country schools and also In high school 
and normal and college work. He is a member of 
all the educational associations in Nebraska, has con- 
tributed numerous educational articles, and written 
several monographs on educational topics. Professor 
Hart has extremely complimentary testimonials from 
such men as Chancellor Andrews of the University of 
Nebraska, Dr. A. E. Winship of Boston, Dean 
Bently of Clark college, Worcester, besides a large 
list of prominent school men in the state of Nebraska. 
Professor Hart will assume his duties July I and be 
present at the summer school of agriculture. He 
will not take up his regular residence in Amherst, 
however, until the opening of the new college year. 
He is married, but has no children. It is believed 
that the Massachusetts Agricultural College is the first 
institution in the United States to organize this work 
on so broad a foundation, although many other col- 
leges have introduced various phases of instruction 
for those desiring to teach agriculture. 



THE APPROPRIATIONS. 

Mr. Wright of South Hadley, for the ways and 
means committee, reported ought to pass in a new 
draft on the Massachusetts Agricultural College ap- 
propriation bill. It cuts the $73,000 recommended 
by the committee on agriculture to $45,900, to be 
used as follows : Equipping barn, stable and milk 
room, $3000; live-stock, $4000; equipping and 
furnishing Clark Hall, $24,400 ; boiler for heating 
and lighting plant, $2000; further equipment, main- 
tenance, repairs and minor improvements, $12,500. 
While it was expected that the greenhouse items 
would be cut out, the other cuts in the appropriation 
come somewhat as a surprize , causing considerable 
disappointment. 



— Two band concerts have been given during the 
past two weeks by the college band, assisted by T. V. 
Short, who has been instructing the band during the 
year. Both were well attended, both by students and 
town's people, the efforts of the band being greatly 
appreciated. 



Colleg? N°*?S- 



— The 1907 class bed on the lawn east of South 
College has been laid out. 

— Paige, '08, has gone to Huntington, Mass, to 
start a nursery of forest trees. He will be away for 
about two weeks. 

— Professor Waugh gave a lecture on May 15, in 
Williamsburg under the direction of the State Board 
of Education. He presented the advantages of our 
Summer School to the teachers of that vincinity. 

— The seniors and the faculty played a base-ball 
game Tuesday, May 14, upon the campus, resulting 
in a victory for the seniors of 8 to 4. The game was 
full of sensational plays, especially on the part of 
faculty players. 

—Allen, '08, Webb, '09, Neale, '09, Turner, '09, 
Burke and Woodward of 1910 have been carrying on 
extensive work in pruning and landscape gardening at 
the "Holyoke Country Club" under the supervision of 
Mr. G. A. Bishop, Instructor of Horticulture. 

— P. W. Farrar and W. A. Cummings, both of 
the class of 1908, have returned to college after a 
three weeks absence at "Turner Hill," Ipswich, 
Mass., where they have been doing horticultural and 
landscape work for T. G. Smith, '93, superintendent 
of the estate. C. C. Gawday is at present at "Turner 
Hill" engaged in entomological work under Mr. 
Smith. 

— The meeting of the Stockbridge club on May 14 
was omitted on account of the band concert which 
was given on that evening. At the meeting May 21, 
William H. Caldwell, '87, secretary of the American 
Guernsey Cattle club, spoke upon the merits of the 
Guernsey bred cattle. Mr. Caldwell outlined the 
history of the breed and the particular merits which 
breeders claim for this breed of cattle. 

— The meeting of the Y. M. C. A. on May 16 
was addressed by Prof. G. F. Mills, who spoke upon 
the "Y. M. C. A. in M. A. C," its place In the 
college life, and the work which it should do. At 
the meeting on May 23, Don S. Gates, General Col- 
lege Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. addressed the 
college association on " Northfield," speaking of the 
Northfield Conference and his wish that M. A. C. 
send a good delegation to the conference this summer. 






1 86 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



187 




— The Department of Horticulture has established 
a school garden just west of Wilder Hall and near the 
street car-line. The school garden pupils came from 
Kellogg Ave. School, Amherst, and are under the 
joint care of Miss Ada M. Grover, teacher in the 
Amherst schools and H. D. Hemenway (M. A. 
C, '95,) special instructor in school gardening. 
Professor Waugh has conducted school gardens in 
Amherst before, but this is the first time the work 
has been done on the college grounds. There is a 
special reason for the work this year in the fact that 
school gardening is to be a special feature of the 
summer school. 

— Prof. L. R. Herrick gave an interesting lecture 
in the chapel Thursday night, May 16, upon "Tangier, 
the Outpost of Barbarism." The lecture was illus- 
trated by stereopticon views of the kingdom of 
Mohammed and the white city of Tangier, with its 
narrow streets filled with dusky Moors and burly 
negros, leading their patient beasts of burden through 
the market places and on to the great Sahara beyond. 
The quaint customs of the Moroccans in their public 
places, their schools, homes and temples of worship, 
their high dignity of personal bearing and sincerity in 
observance of the Moorish religious rites, together 
with their deadly horror of the foreigners sacriligious 
camera, made interesting entertainment for those who 
were so fortunate as to be able to attend Prefessor 
Herrick's lecture. 

Dr. Austin W. Morrill of the bureau of ento 

mology, United States department of Agriculture, 
gave a lecture Tuesday morning, May 21, in the 
Wilder Hall lecture room upon "Fumigation of Citrus 
trees," a work which he has been carrying on in 
Florida. The lecture was well illustrated by lantern 
slides, showing the methods of covering the orange 
trees with hugh canvas tents, and the fumigation with 
hydrocyanic acid gas for the destruction of the white 
fly, which does so much damage in the orange dis- 
trict. Dr. Morrill is a graduate of the college, in 
the class of 1900. He lectured at the request of 
Prof. H. T. Fernald, and closed his talk with an 
appreciation of the incomparable equipment and 
training of the entomological department of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural Gollege. 

President Butterfield has made announcement 

of a few important changes in the matter of junior and 



senior electives. Hereafter drill In the senior year 
will be elective, counting as so many credits toward a 
diploma. Those who do not elect drill in the senior 
year will be obliged to take studies amounting to an 
equal number of credits. This change has long 
been wished for by the student body, and the 
announcement was received with considerable 
gratification. This change necessarily affects the 
course in tactics which in the past has been given 
in the senior year. The course will hereafter be 
given in the junior year, and be required of those 
seniors electing drill next year. Another change is in 
regard to the course in rural sociology as required by 
the catalog three hours a week during the second 
semester of the junior year. The course will be 
made elective instead of required, and will be so 
scheduled that both juniors and seniors can take it. 
The course next year will be upon "rural com- 
munities." The year following it will embrace the 
" economics of marketing and transportation of 
agricultural products." 

— President K. L. Butterfield started Thursday, 
noon for a 10 days' trip in the West, principally to 
Michigan. He delivered an address Friday before the 
Western State Normal school at Kalamazoo, Mich., 
the lecture being the first annual rural progress lecture 
as arranged for by that institution, and the subject 
being, "The Social Factors in Rural Progress." A 
neat little programme of the occasion contains a 
recognition of President Butterfield as the leading 
American exponent of rural sociological questions. 
From Kalamozoo he went to Chicago, where he at- 
tended Saturday night the annul reunion and Banquet of 
the Western Alumni Association of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. He will then return to Michi- 
gan, going to Lanning to attend the meeting May 
28-29 of the Association of American Agricultural 
Colleges and Experiment Stations. The remainder of 
the week will be spent at Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege, in attendance at the semicentennial celebration 
of the founding of the college. As Michigan was the 
first institution to open its doors to students in virtue 
of the benefits received from the land grants, much 
will be made of this semicentennial celebration. 
Michigan, however, existed as an agricultural college 
before the passage of the Morrill Act. President 
Roosevelt will be present and take part in the 



exercises. Massachusetts Agricultural College will 
be represented by President Butterfield, who grad- 
uated from Michigan in 1891, the trustees of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College will be represented 
by William H. Bowker, who graduated from Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College in 1871, and the 
Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station will be 
represented by Director William P. Brooks and Prof. 
George E. Stone, both graduates of Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



SENATE RULINGS IN REGARD TO HAZING. 

1. The Senate shall appoint in June of each year a 
Vigilance Committee of three seniors, two juniors and one 
sophomore to have charge of all hazing. 

2. All hazing shall be done between the opening of the 
college and the Thanksgiving recess and between March 1 
and March 17. 

3. Nothing shall be done to any subject to endanger his 
life, limb or health. 

4. This committee shall have the power with the consent 
of the Senate to deal with special cases at any time. 

5. Any infringement of these rules shall be dealt with by 
the Senate, and at its discretion shall be reported to the 
faculty. 



HIGHER EDUCATION. 

The Springfield Republican of a recent date takes 
up a discussion of the problems of a higher education 
in America,— a discussion which is particularly oppor- 
tune at this period in the growth of Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. The discussion is based upon 
a little volume which has recently been published by 
Scribners entitled "American Liberal Education," 
written by Dean Andrew Fleming West of Princeton 
graduate school. The discussion is of particular 
interest to M. A. C. as one of the technical colleges 
because of the recent steps taken to establish a depart- 
ment and professorship of the "humanities" at Mass- 
'chusetts. That the "humanities" have their place 
in our curriculum is evident, but it is also evident 
that the students fail to grasp the full meaning of 
such a change in the generally "utilitarian" course 
of an agricultural college. We are but more appre- 
ciative of the far-seeing wisdom of our new president 
and his worthy associates on the faculty. The Repub- 
lican's account is in part as follows : 

The business of getting an education has compli- 
cated itself since the days when the old-fashioned 



college course was the single road that was supposed 
to lead everywhere. It was a road, to be sure, which 
'•practical" men did not always approve of; there 
were others beside Horace Greeley who lumped col- 
lege students with "horned cattle." Complaint was 
made of the preponderance of book learning ; practical 
America gives fuller sanction to the excellent tech- 
nical constitution which have so greatly developed 
during the past generation. So far as training can 
be made practical the graduate of one of these insti- 
tutions, whether in civil, mechanical or electrical 
engineering, seems to be soundly equipped, and no 
fault, it would seem, could be found with such an 
education on that score. "It is a common criticism 
that graduates of techical schools are narrow, and 
that, while suited for subordinate positions, they are 
not so well qualified for high administrative positions 
as college men. The writer believes that, taken 
broadly, this criticism is unsound ; that is to say, he 
does not believe that the average college man is 
better fitted for administrative work or is any broader 
than the average technical graduate. Nevertheless 
he believes that there is much suggest iveness in the 
charge, and that the technical schools may profit by 
considering it." On the other hand we find Dean 
West criticising the technical schools for doing so 
little for science : "The tecnical aspects of the 
sciences taught have tended more and more to create 
a demand for strictly technological instruction to the 
exclusion of the theoretical and nontechnical aspects. 
It is this cause more than any other which has tended 
to restrict the energies of schools of science to the 
production of experts in the various mechanical and 
chemical arts and industries and has caused them to 
do so little for the advancement of pure science." 

It is not needful here to discuss the soundness of 
either criticism, so far as it touches the work of our 
best technical schools. There can be no doubt, how- 
ever, that there is a very strong tendency in this 
country toward a kind of practicality the ultimate wis- 
dom of which may be doubted even on the ultilitarian 
side. It manifests itself in a spirit of contempt for 
studies the wage-earning value of which is not imme- 
diately apparent, and it often seriously cripples devel- 
opment. The country is full of stenographers who 
studied shorthand because it is "practical" and neg- 
lected English which is really ten times as practical ; 






1 88 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



189 







of clerks who studied book-keeping and neglected 
books ; of draftsmen who learned young to copy other 
people's work and will never do any of their own 5 of 
half-trained experts of every kind, who have a mechan- 
ical dexterity in their own field, but no solid founda- 
tion of useless things to build upon. And this short- 
sighted policy has become a real menace to Ameri- 
can education in all grades from the primary to the 
graduate school. 

It is clear that the relations at present between the 
colleges and the professional schools are not quite 
happy, chiefly because of their unfortunate overlapp- 
ing of ages and of kinds of work. The author sug- 
gests as a solution that all professional schools should 
exact as an entrance requirement two years of college 
work. But this is on the face of it irregular and illo- 
gical. What Is really needed, apparently, in our edu- 
cational system is a new degree — a degree corres- 
ponding somewhat to the French "bachelier." It is 
such a degree as might naturally come at the time 
when the education sharply divides — when In all col- 
leges, or almost ail, increased opportunities for elect- 
ives are offered, and studies of a broader character 
are undertaken. It would be something between a 
high school diploma and the degree of bachelor of arts 
— a certificate that the foundations are soundly laid 
and that the student is equipped for undertaking spe- 
cial studies of whatever character fits his needs. If 
such a degree became universally established it would 
become the most important of academic degrees next 
to that of doctor, which would mark the completion 
of work, as the new degree would mark the comple- 
tion of preparation for work. The degree of bachelor 
Is too much or not enough ; it does not certify to effi- 
ciency, and it involves too protracted studies to be 
required as a starting point for professional studies. 
There Is no reason to fear that the conferring of such 
a degree would rend the college course in twain ; it 
would merely draw a sharper line between lower and 
upper class-men, and give a dignity and sense of res- 
ponsibility to the latter which would not at all be a 
disadvantage. And those who had taken the lower 
degree might well, even in college, begin serious 
studies leading toward the special career before them. 
Dean West, like many other observers, is not quite 
satisfied with the later developments of post-graduate 
work. This is B a comparatively modern thing in Ame- 



rican college life — a generation or so ago the colleges 
had little to offer beyond the four-years' course, and 
there was small demand for post-graduate studies. 
There has been a great change, but the complaint is 
made that the post-graduate courses are little more 
than fitting schools for teachers; that tney are nar- 
rowly specialized and are resorted to for professional 
rather than humanistic ends. It is at this point, per- 
haps, that American universities can least challenge 
comparison with those of Europe ; the graduate 
schools, which give a university its character, are 
weak and lack influence. As the author says : "No 
aggregation of professional and technical schools 
makes a real university, because such an aggrega- 
tion lacks its vital center, its faculty of arts.and scien- 
ces, which alone can maintain the universal standards 
of knowledge in all their exactness and vigor." But 
while these other schools will always flourish so long 
as there are men seeking to be educated in order to 
make a profitable living, "graduate work in liberal 
studies cannot be maintained on this basis." To 
study to make a living "is not a scholarly end." And 
when a graduate school becomes an employment bu- 
reau, "a sordid motive enters, and it is in danger of 
learning to be a school devoted to the cause of truth 
and knowledge." 

As a result of present conditions the standards of 
knowledge in graduate work are threatened by "an 
unenlightened specialization." There should be some 
consideration of the intrinsic value of the thing studied. 
It is not enough in the larger economy of things, 
that it brings a degree, and that the degree brings a 
tutorship. It is not specialization in itself to which 
Dean West objects, but the study of the unimportant, 
whether it takes the form of investigating trifles, or of 
proving the obvious by selemn statistics. 

If the graduate schools of most of our universities 
are not all that could be wished, it is due in part, no 
doubt, to this stunting specialization. Yet a deeper 
reason is to be found in the small and diminishing 
appeal which scholarship for its own sake makes : 
"The attractions of a scholar's life are not relatively 
as great as they were a generation ago, nor is the 
honor paid to the schools so great in our land as in the 
older civilization of Great Britain, France and Ger- 
many. " And so the responsibility ultimately comes 
back upon the nation and the nation's ideals. 



D{p&rtm*rvf f4ot*s. 




DEPARTMENT OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 

The work in the testing of pure bred cows which 
has been carried on for the last six months has 
decreased of late. During the past fall and winter 
four to six men have been continually engaged in this 
work. It is still expected that next fall still further 
demands will be made upon the division along this 
line. W. K. Hepburn recently spent several days in 
Littleton testing the Ayrshire herd belonging to G. L. 
Stone. 

Large quantities of inferior and adulterated cotton- 
seed meal has been put on the market in Massachu- 
setts this winter. The station is about ready to dis- 
tribute a circular to the grain dealers of the state rel- 
ative to this meal. 

Work under the Adams Funds relative to the 
action of food constituents in modifying the character 
of butter fats has been in progress for the last four 
months. The work has been carried on at the station 
barn and in the laboratory. It has shown, among 
other things, that the oil extracted from soy beans 
has a marked influence in changing the proportion of 
the several glycerides entering into the fat molecule. 

A bulletin is in preparation relating to the value of 
molasses as a food for all kinds of farm stock. 

This division Is in search of an expert chemist to 
do research work in connection with experiments in 
plant and animal nutrition. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The Sophomore-Senior promenade will be held 
June 18. For particulars and invitations address 
Gordon R. Fulton, Amierst. 

>37._Dr. E. R. Flint of Gainesville, Fla., has 
sailed for Panama on a four months appointment on 
the medical staff. 



•88. — At the 28th Annual Meeting of the American 
Guernsey Cattle Club, held at the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, New York, May 15, Secretary William H. 
Caldwell of Peterboro, N. H. was elected to repre- 
sent the club at the conference to be held as sug- 
gested by the bureau uf Animal Industry, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, for the purpose of forming 
requirements for a uniform dairy standard. 

EIGHTY-NINE. 

(Prepared by F. W. Davis, '89.) 

A partial roster of the class is as follows : 
Adams, George A. , (non-grad.) 1819 Diversey Boul- 
varde, Chicago, III. Salesman. Married. 

Alger, Isaac, (non-grad.) Attleboro. Salesman. 
Married. 

Blair, James R., Superintendent C. Brigham Co. 
milk contractors, 158 Massachusetts Ave . , Cam- 
bridge. Married and has a family. 

Copeland, Arthur D., grain merchant, Brockton, lives 
at 494 Copeland St., Campello. Married, one 
child. 

Crocker, Charles S., chemist, American Agricultural 
Co., Phiadelphla, Pa. Address Passyunk Sta- 
tion, Philadelphia. Wife not living. Class 
secretary. 

Davis, Franklin W., journalist, 85 Colberg Ave., 
Roslindale. Telegraph editor Boston Record. 
Secretary Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Alumni Club of Massachusetts. Married, two 
children. 

Fuller, Edward A., (non-grad.) 22 Jackson St., 
Lawrence. 

Hartwell, Burt L., Ph. D., State Experiment Station, 
Kingston, R. 1. Married and has a family. 
Class president. 

Hubbard, Dwight L., civil engineer, city of Boston, 
lives 645 Washington St., Brighton. Married 
and family. 

Huse, Fred R., (non-grad.) 95 Blackstone St., Bos- 
ton. Firm of Joseph Huse & Son, North Car- 
olina Mica. Has been married. 







igo 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Hutchings, Jame T. , Superintendent electric plant, 
Rochester, N. Y., 656 Auerel Ave. Married. 

Miles, Arthur M., D. D. S., 12 BrooklineSt. Cam- 
bridge. Practising dentist. 

North, Mark N., D. V. S., Bay and Green Sts., 
Cambridge. 

Nourse, Arthur M., farmer, Westboro. Married and 
family. 

Sellew, Robert P., salesman for J. W. Biles Co. of 
Cincinnati, office 31 Whitney Building, Boston. 

Whitney, Charles A., fruitgrower, Upton. President 
Massachusetts Fruit Grower's Association. 
Not married. 

Woodbury, Herbert E., M. D., 1512 North Dela- 
ware St., Indianapolis, Ind. Married, one child. 

The class of '89 will have a reunion this year at 
Commencement time, probably at the Sunderland 
House, Tuesday evening, June 18. A dozen of the 
class at least are expected to be present. 

NINETY-FOUR. 

Edwin H. Alderman, Middlefield. 
Arthur C. Curtis, St. Austin's School, Salisbury, 
Conn. 

Arthur H. Cutter, M. D., 333 Broadway, Lawrence. 

Hadley M. Fowler, Mansfield. 

John E. Gifford, Brockton. 

Ira C. Greene, 222 Pleasant St., Leominster. 

Charles H. Higgins, D. V. S., Biological Laboratory, 
Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada. 

S. Francis Howard, 10 Allen St., Amherst. 

Thaddeus F. Keith, 8 Wallace Ave., Fitchburg. 

Charles P. Lounsbury, Cape Town, Cape of Good 
Hope, South Africa, address while in United 
States, 66 Montclair Ave., Roslindale. 

Horace P. Smead, Greenfield, R. F. D. 
Elias D. White, 283 Uwton St., Atlanta, Ga. 
Born May 17, a son, Herbert Hall Higgins to Dr. 

and Mrs. Charles H. Higgins at Hintonbury, 

Ontario, Canada. 
Born May 13, a daughter, Alice Ward Walker to Dr. 

and Mrs. Claude F. Walker. 



'95. — Married April 21, Henry A. Balbu to Bertha 
Deithton, daughter of ex-president of Harrison Col- 
lege. Mr. Ballou is entomologist for the British 
West Indies. 

'95. — A. F. Burgess was at the college last week 
to consult with Mr. Haskins and Professor Fernald. 
Mr. Burgess is in charge of laboratory and experi- 
mental work of the Gypsy Moth Commission under 
A. H. Kirkland. 

'95. — Born to Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Hemenway of 
Northampton, on April 7, a daughter, Truth Mary 
Hemenway. 

'95.— The address of H. W. Lewis is 278 Barrow 
St., Jersey City, N. J. Employed by the Hudson 
companies, on the Jersey City tunnels, corner Wash- 
ington and First Streets, Jersey City. 

'97. — Miss Rachel Bancroft Brooks, daughter of 
Professor and Mrs. William P. Brooks, was married 
May 21 to George Albert Drew, at her home in 
Amherst. The best man was Austin Morrill, '00. 

'97.— P. H. Smith attended Field day of the Hol- 
stein Friesian Association held at Brockton, May 23. 

'00. — A. F. Frost of the State Engineering 
Department, State House, Albany, N. Y., recently 
visited college making a special inspection of the 
landscape gardening work. 

'03. — The address of M. H. West has been 
changed to 28 Linden Court, Chicago, III. 

'05. — F. A. Bartlett, who recently accepted a 
position as manager of a large estate in Litchfield, 
Conn., has left this to connect himself with the New 
York office of H. L. Frost & Co. 

'05- '06. — The engagement has been announced 
of William 0. Taft to Miss Monica L. Sanborn. 
They will be married June 5. 

'06. — E. P. Mudge is reported sick at New 
Canaan, Conn., and has temporarily given up his 
position. Dan H. Carey is substituting for him dur- 
ing his illness. 

'05. — A. D. Taylor will sail from Boston June 19 
to spend the summer in England and on the continent 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



191 



of Europe. He will be engaged In the study of 
landscape gardening and will return in the fall to teach 
this subject in Cornell university. 

Ex-'09.— Horace Wells French has given up his 
work as milk tester for the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, and has been engaged to 
take charge of a large estate in Newport, R. 1. 
Address 109 Church St. 



Int^rcolU^i^-tc. 



Owing to the necessity of cutting down the football 
schedule, Princeton has dropped Dartmouth, and 
there will be no football game played between the two 
institutions next year. The score of last year's 
game between the two teams stands 12 to in favor 
of Princeton. 

After investigating the circumstances surrounding 
the trouble which occurred between the Dartmouth 
basketball team and the Williams students at the 
basketball game played at Wiiliamstown on March 8, 
the Dartmouth advisory committee voted to discon- 
tinue the athletic relations between Williams and 
Dartmouth. 

By the will of William C. Egleston, Yale university 
is to receive a bequest of $100,000 the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of standard 
works and rare editions for the general library of the 
university. Another $360,000 comes to Yale library 
by the settlement of the estate of William B. Ross 
of the class of '52. 

Harvard athletic authorities have decided to retain 
football this year. A committee appointed last year 
to look into the state of Harvard athletics has made 
the following recommendations : That the number of 
intercollegiate contests be lessened, that as soon as 
possible professional coaches shall be abolished, and 
that a graduate manager shall be appointed, who shall 
have charge of all branches of athletics, a position 
similar to that of Charles Braid, the Michigan grad- 
uate manager. 



PROGRAMME FOR COMMENCEMENT. 



FRIDAY, JUNE 14. 

Tiih Flint PaiZI Oratorical Contesi, Junior ( lass. 
8 i'. N 



SATURDAY. JUNE IS. 

Thr Bl'KNHAM P«UI Spi-aking, Freshman Cl.iss.S p.m. 
V V 

MNUAY, JUNE 16. 
Ii\< ( ai.aikfaie Address, by Presidf.ni Kinw.n I.. 

BUTTERI" I HI', S' 3° •'• M ' 

• • • • 
* • 

MONDAY. JUNE 17. 

Annual Meeting Of mi I'm Kappa I'm, ii a.m. 
Class Da\ F.xfki isfs, j p. m. 
Open Air Concert hv C<m i Ml Hand, 7 v. m. 
Fraternity Banouets, 8: 30 p. m. 

v V 

TUESDAY. JUNE 18. 

Alumni Day 

Public Anniversary Meeting, with Presentation of the 
Associate Alumni t'ortrait of President l.oodell, 10 A. M. 

Annual Meeting ok ihi Assoi iate Alumni, Mathe 
matical Koom, 11 : 15 a. m. 

Alumni Dinner, 12 1 30 r. M. 

Concert bv M. A. C. Musical Organizations. 

3: 30 r. m. 
Battalion Parade and Drill, s »"• m. 
Class Reunion:, 6: 30 p. m. 

Km eption bv President and Trustees, 8 to 10 p.m. 
Sophomore -.Senior Promenade, 10 p. m. 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19. 

Graduation Exercises, Annoum kment op Prizes, 
and Conferring >.i Degrees, 10 a. m 

Commf.n. kment Address by Pkes (If ari is S. Hovvi- 
of the Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, Ohio. 



THURSDAY AND FRIDAY. JUNE 20 AND 21. 

Kxamination Off Candidates for Admission, at the 
Botanic Museum, 9 a. m. Two full days are required 
for the examinations. 






192 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







Don't Walk on your Heels 

To 8»?«-, your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

ori-osiTK Town Hall. 



Geo. F. Vester, Jr. 



TAILOR 



AND 



DRAPER 



485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

TELEPHONE. 

Broadway and Duanc St., NEW YORK. 

GOOD POSITIONS 
FOR COLLEGE MEN. 

Laat year practically every college man on our liwts was 
placil before September 1st- orei iMmtn all. The demand 
is greater this year, the opportunities better! one Aiulierat 
man whom we placed la l>u*nnis» three years ago in now 
earning fSOOUa year. Shall we take up your case with some 
of the .'o.ooo employers we nerve':* write us today stating 
position desired —teaching, business or technical work, 
unices In 12 cities. 

HAPGOODS, 
The National Organization of Brain Workers. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 

1 if Kuil Ureas Suits to rent. »#-studeiit-' Clothes bought. 



11 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. 

CAMPION, 

TAILOR and HABERDASHER. 

My stock of Woolens for this season includes the 
latest Novelties. 

Our line of Furnishings is the most stylish and 
best in the market. 



NEXT TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



Rabar's 3nn. 

Old South Street, off Main, . NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Ontlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hainp." stop with ua. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



Go to PLUMB, the Barber, 

For an Electric or Air Vibrating Massage, also 
perfect shave, shampoo and hair-cut. 

Of*. AMHitRST Hours. 

COL,L,RGB CITY 

LUNCH AND DELICATESSEN, 

263 Main Strkkt, - - - NORTHAMPTON. 

Everything cooked to order. 

C. F. CHEESEMAN, Manager. 



the college: signal 



VOL. XVII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNE 18, 1907 



NO. 17 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

notify the Business Manager 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER, 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 
R. H. VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager. 
O B. BRICGS, 1 909. Assistant Business Manager. 
-„„ ~ _ . — . . O B. BRIGGS. I <»09, Alumni Notes. 

O. L. CLARK. '*08 b Department Notes. O B ^ 

J. R. PARKER. 1908. Athlet.cs. £ "• ' „ Seminars 

H. T. WHEELER. .908. College Notes. ^ F DA MON «'>0 

C H. WHITE. 1909. Special. E F DAMON - l9, °- 

^. n. wn. ,- w R CLARK ,,,„_ 

TL.jU.ILtt per ».r in ade.nc.. Siagl. Oopie.. .oc. Po.ta 9 . oaf Ida of United State- and Canada. 2*c. extra. 



Y. M. C- A. 

Foot- Ball Association. 

College Senate. 

Reading- Room Association, 

Basket-ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



C. H. White. Pres. 
K. E. Giliett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
J. N. Summers. Sec. 
E. D. Philbrlck. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

Base- Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Nine Indes. 

Fraternity Conference, 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. HowaiJ 
r A. Barry. Manager- 
R. D. Lul 1 . M»nai-r 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman. Manatfrr. 



Entered as second-class matter. Pott Office at Amherst. 



Editor. &ls. 



The college year has drawn to a close. It has 

been a progressive year, a constructive year, a year 

full of new meaning for the college and its work. We 

who have been in the current of college activities 

from day to day and from week to week throughout 

the year have failed in a certain degree to catch the 

real perspective of the year and its deeper significance 

in the history of the college. We have to look at 

things at a little distance to catch their true import. 

The present commencement is the thirty-seventh 

commencement of the college, and marks the fortieth 

anniversary of the foundation of the college, as well 

as the twenty-fifth anniversary of the experiment 

station. The growth of the college during these forty 

years has in good part been parallel to the growth of 

the agricultural idea. While the college has stood for 

many things besides agriculture, yet it has been 

peculiar among land-grant colleges in that it has stood 

for that particular phase of the Morrill Act which 



sought to establish an institution " for the teaching of 
agriculture and allied sciences. " Massachusetts has 
not been preeminently an agricultural state, and so 
perhaps the growth of the agricultural idea, and con 
sequently the growth of the agricultural colleg-; within 
the state, has not been along such wide-spread lines as 
other states in the Union, more professedly agri- 
cultural, have witnessed. But the agricultural Idea in 
Massachusetts has grown and still is growing, more 
rapidly than ever before, and with it the college has 
grown apace. The science of agriculture has also 
grown. In the early years of the Morrill "idea," 
when men had begun to realize that the strength of 
the Nation is foundational^ agricultural, and the im 
pc rtance of developing American agriculture, it was 
hard to find those who, both from training and experi- 
ence, were fitted to teach the new science. And 
it wasn't a science, either, for it had not been system 
atized and reduced to fundamental principles. Is it 
any wonder that our state institutions made slow pro- 
gress at first ? They were dealing with experimental 
sciences, yet in the process of construction, and were 



194 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



• 




handicapped by the difficulty of obtaining men to teach 
those sciences. As the years went by men of better 
and still better training entered the field of teaching, 
graduates of these agricultural colleges, until today, 
though agriculture is still unscientific, we have 
teachers of agriculture who are well trained and fitted 
for the work our agricultural colleges are trying to 
do, and are succeeding in. So this has been the 
history of Massachusetts Agricultural College as one 
of the state institutions. But the experimental stage 
seems to be of the past, and beginning with the past 
college year, the institution has entered upon a pro- 
gressive era, mapping out for Itself in the years to 
come a career of service, economic and social, which 
will place it in the first rank of New England 
institutions. 

There have been many changes during the year which 
nave already had a great influence, and are destined to 
have a still greater influence in the future, upon the 
college and its work. Of first importance has been 
the placing at the head of college affairs a new presi- 
dent, Kenyon L. Butterfield, who has brought with 
him a wide experience and keen insight into collegiate 
affairs, as well as a national reputation as a leader 
along agricultural and sociological lines. He has his 
ambitions for the college and its work, and even one 
year of service has proved that he has the energy and 
ability to carry out these ambitions. His entrance 
into the college life marks the beginning of the 
creative and expansive era. Perhaps the change of 
next importance has been the creation of the office of 
Dean of the college, and the establishment of a 
Division of Humanities. The college has come to a 
point in its growth where a dean is needed, and no 
better choice could have been made than that of Prof. 
George F. Mills, who for eighteen years has served 
faithfully and well as professor of English and Latin, 
making for himself a friend of every student who ever 
graduated from the institution. The creation of a 
Division of Humanaties, with Prof. George F. 
Mills as professor of humanaties, is of two-fold signifi- 
cance. In the first place it signifies that a time has 
come when the humanitarian subjects must have their 
place in the college curriculum, a need which has 
been felt especially during the last few years. In the 
second place the organization of the Division of 



for the eventual organization of all the departments of 
the college work. The Horticultural Department, 
because of its rapid development during the past five 
years under the able management of Prof. Waugh, 
has been the first department to undergo this reorgan- 
ization, and we now have a Division of Horticulture, 
with Prof. F. A. Waugh as professor of general horti- 
culture, and under his general charge several depart- 
ments, a department of Pomology under Prof. F. C. 
Sears, a department of Floriculture under Prof. 
E. A. White, a department of Landscape Gardening 
under Prof. Waugh, who also holds the title of pro- 
fessor of landscape gardening, and eventually, as time 
and demand warrant, departments of arboriculture, 
market-gardening, forestry, etc. 

The college has suffered two severe losses during 
the past year, one by death, and one by resignation. 
Trustee James Draper was without doubt one of the 
best and most earnest friends the college ever had. 
He gave without thought of personal Inconvenience or 
loss fully of his time and means and energy for the 
sake of the college which he took a personal pride in 
and loved as only such men as he can love. He has 
been largely responsible for the rapid growth of 
the college during the past few years, being in 
good part instrumental in the erection of Draper 
Hall, Wilder Hall and Clark Hall. Another 
loss to the college comes In the recent resig- 
nation of Prof. Charles Goessmann as professor of 
chemistry and chemist of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. Dr. Goessmann came to 
the college forty years ago upon the request of his 
friend and classmate at Goettingen, Pres. W. S. 
Clark, and during his forty years of service has played 
a prominent part in the organization of the college 
and experiment station. Dr. Goessmann possesses 
those qualities of character which have endeared him 
to all who have met him and been under him during 
his long period of service. His influence upon the 
college and its work will never be forgotten. 

During the past year two new buildings have been 
erected and are rapidly nearing completion. Archi- 
tect Burnett says of the new barn "nothing better in 
my opinion along sanitary and practical lines has ever 
been built In this country," and Mr. Burnett is a man 
of wide experience In the construction of barns, hav- 




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second place tne organization oi me i^iv.a.u.. «. ui w.^ «—»~ 

Humanities is indicative of a vast underlying plan | ing built some of the best and most expensive in the 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



195 



country. Clark Hall, the new $75,000 botanical 
building, is also a fine addition to the equipment of 
the college. It is of good structure, roomy, well- 
lighted, and a handsome building, situated on one of 
the most commanding spots upon the campus. The 
Botanical Department is well equipped for its work, 
which is being made greater demand upon every year. 
Various other improvements have also taken place 
about college, especially about Wilder Hall. Many 
additions have been made to the equipment of the 
building, especially in the landscape gardening depart- 
ment, and so many additions in the line of furnishings 
and decorations have been added to the building that 
It has become the prettiest place upon the campus, 
as well as the most practical and convenient. The 
Experiment Station is soon to undergo extensive 
repairs, and additions are to be made to the lighting 
capacity of the Heating and Lighting station. 

From the standpoint of student activities and senti- 
ment the year has also been successful. The athletic 
teams have played their best, and while we are handi- 
capped by a small number of students to pick from, 
and no special inducements to offer men of athletic 
ability, yet our teams are always winners in their 
class, and good antagonists for the teams of larger 
colleges. That Dartmouth, Brown, Tufts, and simi- 
lar institutions have asked for a place upon our sched- 
ules is a sure indication that Massachusetts teams put 
"out the real article" in the line of sports. The 
trend of student sentiment as expressed by the Col- 
lege Senate and Fraternity Conference has been direct- 
ed in wholesome and profitable ways,and there has been 
little expression of dissatisfaction and class or frater- 
nity feeling during the year. The men who have 
made up these two student organizations have been 
of the best type with the best college interests at 
heart. Their work can not be over-estimated. 



BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 



REPORT OF BASKETBALL SEASON 1906-07. 

Receipts, $769.75 

Expenditures, 



728.55 



Cash on hand, $41.20 

(Signed) E. D. Philbrick, Manager. 
This may certify that I have examined the accounts 
for the basketball season and find them as above 

Stated " C. E. Gordon, Auditor. 



At 3-30 Sunday afternoon, June 16, Pres't Kenyon 
L. Butterfield delivered the Baccalaureate Sermon to 
the graduating class. He took as his subject "Lead- 
ership," a few extracts of which are as follows : 

"It is natural to believe in great men." We see 
the power of leadership everywhere. We know the 
inspiration of heroic biography. The names of David, 
Caesar, Robert Bruce, Washington still stir the 
imagination and warm the impluse to high endeavor. 
We "cannot even hear of personal vigor of any kind, 
great power of performance, without fresh resolutions." 
The need of leadership in a country and an age like 
our own is peculiarly pressing. It is the theory of 
democratic government, as James Bryce says, "that 
every citizen has, or ought to have, thought out for 
himself certain opinions, i. e. ought to have a defined 
view, defensible by arguments, of what the country 
needs, of what principles ought to be applied in gov- 
erning it, of the men to whose hands the government 
ought to be entrusted. " This theory as every one 
knows does not hold in practice. Prejudices, aver- 
sions, catchwords, prepossession for leaders, form a 
compound that stands in the place of logical analysis. 
The people in a democracy are unusually susceptible 
to leadership, hence their leaders have an unwonted 
responsibility and power. Phillips Brooks remarks 
somewhere that "In the great test of popular institu- 
tions which is coming, the most critical of all ques- 
tions concerning them will be as to their power to con- 
trol their own leadership, and to express the better and 
stronger, and not the worse and weaker, portions of 
their life through those whom the nation calls frorn 
the mass of her citizens and sets in public stations." 
The types of leadership are multiform. Leader- 
ship is in its beginnings almost identical with influence. 
When we define more sharply we think of influence 
as the mark left by another's word, or bearing, or 
act, even if made unconsciously. We regard leader 
ship as something definite, organized, consciously 
undertaken. Nevertheless we find forms of leader- 
ship that seem to depend largely upon the unorganized 
influence of others. The character of a strong man, 
the firmly expressed convictions of a forceful thinker, 
the sturdy attitude of a courageous citizen, even 
though they come by the way, in the ordinary routine 



w w 



ig6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



of life, frequently mold our own thought to very defi- 
nite ends. 

"Be noble and the nobleness that lies 

In other men, sleeping but never dead. 
Will rise in majesty to meet thine own." 
One man in a community who simply thinks soundly 
and speaks boldly and acts nobly may be a real leader. 
The present age is preeminently a time when lead- 
ers in all fields are demanded. Now problems are 
arising. New uses are being found for social institu- 
tions. Everywhere men are asking for leadership that 
shall point the way toward better conditions of life, 
leadership capable of organizing the better social 
elements for warfare against bad government, ignor- 
ance, and irreligion. Every man and woman of us is 
called upon to help in the struggle against predatory 
wealth, against corruption and incompetence in gov- 
ernment, to support the men like Huges and Folk and 
Jerome, who are leaders in the struggle. Nay we 
are ourselves called to be leaders in the fray. For 
the need of captains is almost as pressing as the need 
of generals. Our schools today in every community 
are awaiting leaders who shall bring them to a larger 
usefulness to the pupil and to the community as a 
whole. Our church life waits for leadership in vitaliz- 
ing the religious principle so that it shall count for 
more in the lives of men. 

As we study the men who have won high leader- 
ship we seem to find a few characteristics common to 
all. I shall venture therefore to name some three or four 
qualifications which seem to belong to character rather 
than to intellect, to the qualities of heart rather than 
of mind. This is not because mental strength and full 
knowledge are not needed by the leaders, but because 
as a matter of fact men more often fail to achieve 
leadership through some defect of character than 
through lack of intellectual capacity. As Phillips 
Brooks said, a great man is not a mere expert, but a 
man ; he is great not in some special skill, but as a 
man. The leader impresses himself upon men 
because of his personality, and personality is a com- 
pound in which qualities of character determine the 
result far more decisively than the possession of knowl- 
edge or the power of sustained thinking. 

One requisite of permanent leadership is sincerity. 
Men must believe In the honesty of purpose of the 
statesman, the entire devotion to truth of the thinker. 
There must be confidence in the man. 



Another qualification for leadership is sympathy. 
By sympathy we mean an appreciation of others' point 
of view, a broad understanding of human need, tact In 
dealing with men. Probably no man ever had fuller 
sympathy with certain phases of human life than 
Abraham Lincoln. It is often said that he trusted the 
people. Yes, but he knew the people— knew their 
ideas of government, their honesty, their patriotism. 
He knew too their foibles, their shortcomings. 

Self-relience Is essential to leadership. The leader 
must have confidence in his own judgments and 
decisions. Leaders are men who express convictions 
which the multitude have only half-formed, or who 
transmute the convictions of the mass into deeds that 
count for progress. The leader must therefore rely 
not on the eddies or whirls of thought, but he must 
understand the main currents. 

It is peculiarly necessary that self-reliance and 
sympathy shall balance one another. Self-reliance 
may easily degenerate Into mere stubbornness or 
obstinacy, or it may be fanned into a flame of fanati- 
cism. Sympathy may lead one to such an apprecia- 
tion of the importance of the views of others that he 
has none of his own. The true leader, as Phillips 
Brooks says, will be both exceptional and representa- 
tive. He will be representative because he is a man 
of his time, in tune with the voices of the age, respon- 
sive to the half-expressed faith of the people. But he 
is also exceptional because he does express what other 
men can only partially make clear, he can do what 
other men falter at undertaking, he achieves what 
other men dream of. 

All would agree that courage is necessary to leader- 
ship. But I like to use the word Chivalry for express- 
ing this great quality of the leader. The man who Is 
not only brave , but tender ; courageous, but kind ; 
strong, but generous; aggressive , but modest ; self - 
contained, but full of enthusiasm ; resourceful in 
emergencies, but gentle and full of the spirit of help- 
fulness, he it is who inspires and leads men. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



197 



THE 1907-1908 SENATE. 

The Senate for next year has been organized as 
follows: 1908— K. E. Gillett, president, A. J. Far- 
ley, vice-president, J. R. Parker, T. A. Barry, T. 
L. Warner; 1909— P. E. Alger, secretary and treas- 
urer, G. R. Fulton, O. C. Bartlett, S. S. Crossman. 



FLINT ORATORICAL CONTEST. 

On Friday night, June 14, the first of the Com- 
mencement exercises took place in the chapel. The 
Flint prize speakers of the junior class, 1908, met at 
this time for the prize speaking contest before a good 
sized audience of enthusiastic listeners. Prof. George 
F. Mills presided, and introduced the speakers, 
announcing their subjects as follows : 

PROGRAMME 

MUSIC 

ROLAND Halk Vbmsck, Maiden 

A Call to Arms 

Samuel Judd Wrk.h t South Sudbury 

"/« Time of Peace Prepare for War" 

William Franklin Tirner, .... Reading 

A Possible Commercial Rival of the United States 

MUSIC 

Thomas AdDU Harry Amherst 

Exclusion of the Chinese 

DAVIS Larsen Bridgeport, Conn. 

Pack to Nature 

Kenneth French Gillett, . . 
Future Leaders 

MUSIC 

The program was enhanced with music during the 
exercises. The judges of the contest were Dr. Fred- 
erick Tuckerman, '78, of Amherst, Dr. John Erskine 
of Amherst College and Mr. F. A. Hosmer of 
Amherst. 



Southwick 



PROGRAMME 

MUSIC 

Napoleon's Address to his Army 
LOUII Hkani»t 

An Address to the Sons of Liberty 

m by ,1 Student of /Sates C 'otb;i;e " 

Ai.mon Kucjkne Call 

A Plea for Cuba .... by John M. Thurston 

c.ustak Arnold Niei.skn 

Unjust National Acquisition . by Thomas Com'tn 
ALLAN James Ron 

MUSIC 

Decoration Day. A Vision of War 

by Robert G. In^eisoll 

Walter Rok Clakkk 

Gray Wolf, Creat Warrior by P.tnmet Campbell Hall 

Mykon Smith Hazkn 

Bunker Hill Monument . . . by Daniel Webster 

EdwaAO Harrison Tlrner 

William McKinley by John Hay 

William Ki>wari» Leonard 

MUSIC 

Music was furnished by able musicians. The 
judges of the contest were Rev. W. M. Crawford of 
Amherst, Mr. Charles H. Marshall, principal of 
Amherst High School and Mr. H. W. Gladman, sec- 
retary of the Amherst College Y. M. C. A. 



BURNHAM DECLAMATIONS. 

On Saturday night, June 15, the Burnham prize 
contestants of the freshman class, 1910, met in the 
chapel for the prize declamation contest. Mr. R. 
W. Neal presided, introducing the speakers and their 
subjects as follows \ 



THE 1907.1908 FRATERNITY CONFERENCE. 

The Fraternity Conference for next year has been 
organized as follows : Kappa Sigma— J- R. Parker, 
president, R. C. Lendblad; Q. T. V.-T. L. War- 
ner, vice president, L. W. Chapman; C. S. C— T. 
A Barry O C. Bartlett, secretary and treasurer ; 
Phi Sigma Kappa, K. E. Gillett, M. W. Thompson. 
The retiring Fraternity Conference voted to assess 
$6 00 upon each fraternity to make up the deficiency 
incurred in running the Informal Dances of the year. 



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Colleg? No**S- 



—Lloyd W. Chapman, '08, was obliged to leave 
college early on account of sickness. 

— R. C. Lindblad, 1909, was recently elected 
assistant manager of the 1907 basketball team. 

After a long siege with unfavorable weather the 

painters have finished work upon the Kappa Sigma 
House. 

The Kappa Sigma Cycle appeared early in the 

week. It takes the form of a general review and 
summary of the college year. 

By vote of the trustees Mr. Holcomb's title has 

been changed from instructor in economics and his- 
tory to assistant professor of political science. 

By vote of the trustees there will be next year in 

the department of chemistry two assistants, thus 
increasing the working force of the laboratories. 

At a meeting of the members of this year's base- 
ball team, G. R. Gobb was re-elected captain and 
assistant manager S. S. Crossman elected to the 
position of manager. 

The trustees at their meeting June 7 in Boston 

appropriated money for extensive improvements in the 
experiment station buildings. These will be carried 
out during the summer months. 

President Kenyon L. Butterfield and Prof. F. A. 

Waugh were guests of the annual meeting of the 
Round Table of School Superintendents held June 8 
in the Amherst House. Both President Butterfield 
and Professor Waugh were called upon to speak of 
the college and its work. Later In the day the party 
took a tally-ho and drove about town, making a stop 
at Wilder Hall. 

Mr. S. B. Haskill, for the past two years instruc- 
tor in agriculture, has been granted by the board of 
trustees a year's leave of absence without pay. Mr. 
Haskell expects to take up graduate work during the 
year at the University of Leipsic. His place will be 
filled next year by a man who will be known as direc- 
tor of short courses, and who will have charge of the 
dairy course during the winter months and what other 
short courses may be given in agriculture at the col- 
lege. 



—The short course in Bee Culture ended June 4, 
and must be regarded as being very successful, though 
the cold and unseasonable weather interfeared some- 
what with the practical work. Dr. E. F. Phillips, 
the expert aviculturist of the Department of Agricul- 
ture, gave three valuable lectures in the course, one 
on bee diseases, one on races of bees, and one on 
queen rearing, a subject of which he is an acknowl- 
edged authority. 

— The Committee onAppropriations of the Connecti- 
cut State Legislature visited college June 10 to view 
the college grounds and buildings. The Connecticut 
Legislature has recently appropriated large sums for 
the Connecticut Agricultural College, and visited M. 
A. C. in the interests of seeing how such money 
should be expended for proper buildings and equip- 
ments. The Connecticut legislators were entertained 
by the president and several members of the faculty, 
dinner being served at Draper Hall. 



FRED C. KENNEY. 

The following is taken from the Michigan Agricul- 
tural College Record : 

The readers of the Record will learn with much 
regret that Mr. Fred C. Kenney, for many years 
cashier of the college, is soon to sever his connection 
with this institution and to make his future home at 
Amherst, where he has been elected to the position 
of treasurer of Massachusetts Agricultural college. 

Mr. Kenney entered the employment of the college 
in 1895 under Secretary Butterfield and he has 
remained constantly at his post from that time till 
now, with a sphere of usefulness much broader than 
that comprehended in his title. How faithfully he has 
served the institution and its patrons during all these 
years is evidenced by the countless expressions of 
regard from both faculty and students that are heard 
on every side, and is more indelibly recorded in the 
many and lasting friendships which his helpfulness and 
kindly spirit have inspired. Probably no one has ever 
closed an official connection with M. A. C. with a 
record of more faithful and efficient service, nor whose 
going has been followed with more kindly wishes from 

all. 

The Record bespeaks for him the best of success 
in his future home and new field of employment with 
its still broader opportunities and responsibilities. 



THE COURSE IN FORESTRY. 

During the first week in June the members of the 
junior class electing horticulture and landscape gar- 
dening took the special required course in forestry 
under state forester F. W. Rane. Other members 
of the class took the course electively. It was the 
original intention to devote two and perhaps three or 
four weeks to this work, but it was found necessary 
to crowd it all into one week. During the week Prof. 
Rane conducted a total of eight exercises, seven of 
which were lectures, the other being a field exercise. 
Prof. Rane took up the subject of forestry from a 
purely economical and practical standpoint, merely 
touching upon the aesthetical side of the question, his 
point being that people can be interested In a work 
involving an economic principle, one involving dollars 
and cents and the question of profit and loss, while it 
is difficult to interest a vast majority in questions of 
merely asthetical import. Taking up the subject, 
then, from this point of view, he spoke of the neces- 
sity of systematizing forestry work, the adaption of 
certain lands which now lie idle and are practically 
worthless, and the necessity of preserving forest 
growth as It stands today. He contrasted lumber 
operations In years gone by, when a sort of forest 
rotation was practiced, and each individual went 
through his timber-land and cut out the largest 
growth, — hugh monarchs eighteen inches in diam- 
eter—leaving the smaller trees to perpetuate the 
yield, with the ruthless slashing of forest lands as 
practiced today. In those days the Individual hauled 
his logs to the mill and had them sawed into timber, 
reserving what he wished for his own use, and selling 
the surplus for enough to pay the expenses of milling. 
At the present time the mill Is more frequently taken 
to the forest land, with the consequent result that 
everything marketable is slashed out and sawed into 
lumber. Trees today average five to twelve inches 
In diameter. He then took up methods of reforestation, 
with special reference to white pine, which is the 
standard of marketable lumber in Massachusetts. 
Pine seed is very easy to obtain, but few people know 
what it is, and it is hard to convince the great 
majority that it is bourne in the cone. The little 
pine seedlings must be kept protected from the sun 
until after two years old to prevent burning. Methods 



of forest management were taken up next and the 
various ways of cutting out and replanting discussed. 
Nature will plant her own trees if given the proper 
opportunity. Thursday afternoon Prof. Rane took 
the class to North Amherst upon the invitation of 
Mr. Cowles to study conditions in a growth of 
chestnut which he owns. The growth upon Mr. 
Cowls' lot was cut thirty years ago, since which 
time a good stand of chestnut has sprung up from 
the old stumps. Mr. Cowles pointed out the 
methods of trimming which he should pursue, and the 
value of such trees as he would cut out for ties or 
poles. Under Prof. Ratie's Instruction the class took 
up the operations of measuring and estimating of 
lumber in actual practice, after which the party 
returned to the State Nursery upon the college grounds, 
studying the care and propagating of seedlings. The 
course under Mr. Rane has been very practical and 
instructive, though necessarily rather superficial In so 
short a time. Mr. Rane was professor of horticulture 
at New Hampshire State College until last year, 
when he was appointed state forester of Massachusetts 
to succeed Mr. Akerman. While at New Hampshire 
Mr. Rane developed there, to a considerable extent, 
the course in forestry, acheiving marked success In 
forestry problems and experimental work. During his 
short occupancy of the office of state forester of 
Massachusetts he has done much toward systematiz- 
ing the work and bringing it before the attention of the 
people of the state, and his plans for the future are to 
set the business of forestry in Massachusetts upon a 
business basis in all its phases, from the milling of 
lumber and operations in regard to reforestation to the 
slightest details concerning protection from fire and 
state laws covering all subjects related to the 
forest interests of the state. Prof. Rane be- 
lieves in the education which our land-grant 
colleges are giving and in the general fitness of 
graduates of these institutions to take up this work 
in forestry which has already become so important 
in the economic history of the country. Plans are 
being made to enlarge upon the course offered in 
forestry at Massachusetts Agricultural College, with 
the hope that sometime in the near future there 
will be a department and professor of forestry under 
the general division of horticulture. 






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ADDITIONAL FACULTY CHANGES. 

At the meeting of the board of trustees in Boston 
F. C. Sears of Nova Scotia Agricultural College was 
elected professor of pomology. Prof. Sears is about 
40 years old, being born in Boston during the late '60s, 
a member of the Sears family which was, and still is, 
prominent in eastern Massachusetts. He received 
his early schooling in Boston, but during his youth his 
father moved to a Kansas farm, and the young 
man was brought up with the farm work. For seve- 
ral years before graduation from the Kansas Agricul- 
tural College Mr. Sears managed his father's farm of 
800 acres. Upon graduation he immediately entered 
into post-graduate work, at the same time holding the 
position of assistant horticulturist at the college and 
Kansas Experiment Station. He took his master's 
degree in 1894-1895 for advanced work in agriculture 
and horticulture. 

In the latter part of 1896 he accepted a position as 
professor of horticulture of the Utah Agricultural Col- 
lege and horticulturist of the Utah Experiment Sta- 
tion, but finding conditions at Utah very disagreeable 
and unsatisfactory, he resigned immediately and 
returned to Kansas. Before reaching Kansas he 
was offered and accepted the position of director of 
the Nova Scotia School of Horticulture, supported by 
the provincial government. He conducted this school 
very ably up to the time of its merger with the Nova 
Scotia Agricultural College at Truro, when he became 
professor of horticulture of that institution. His work 
has been along broad lines, teaching, experimental 
work and extension work, and as Nova Scotia is a 
great fruit district, especially in the apple line, he has 
become very proficient and expert on pomological 
lines. He is regarded as a prominent authority by 
the people connected with the Department of Agricul- 
ture in Washington, and the trustees of the Nova 
Scotia Agricultural College offered him a raise of $500 
in salary to stay with the provincial institution. Mr. 
Sears is married and has two children. 

Frank M. Gracey, who was elected by the board of 
trustees at their meeting of the 7th in Boston to fill 
the place of C. P. Halligan, is a graduate of Massa- 
chusetts Normal Art School of Boston in the four 
years' course Mr. Gracey has had an excellent 
preparation in all the branches of drawing, and has 
taught for the past two years in Michigan Agricultural 



College. Mr. Halligan's title was instructor in draw- 
ing, which has been changed to assistant in landscape 
gardening under Mr. Gracey. Mr. Halligan resigned 
to go to Michigan Agricultural College as assistant 
horticulturist. 



ALUMNI MEETING. 

The Western Alumni Association of M. A. C. held 
its annual meeting at the University Club, Dearborn 
Street, Chicago, Illinois, on the evening of May 25. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year : 

L. W. Smith '93, President 

P. C. Brooks '01, Vice-President 

M. H. West '03 Secretary & Treasurer 

W. E. Stone '82, Trustee 

L. A. Nichols 71, 

H. J. Armstrong '97, " 

J. E. Wilder '82, 

G. W. Niles '75, 
A. B. Smith 95, 

It was decided to continue for a period of three 
years the Western Alumni prize by which a sum of 
$25.00 is given each year to a member of the sopho- 
more class at M. A. C. who in the judgment of the 
College Senate and faculty shall have shown during 
his two years the greatest improvement in character, 
example and scholarship. 

Among the post prandial speakers of the evening 
was President Kenyon L. Butterfield, who gave a 
complete and highly interesting review of the year's 
work at the College ending with an optomistic fore- 
cast for the institution. Mr. L. A. Nichols of the 
class of '71, gave some reminiscences of the early 
days of the College, touching on the character and 
methods of the late President Goodell. President 
W. E. Stone of Purdue University gave an interesting 
sketch of the work of the land grant colleges. He 
called especial attention to the increasing value of 
institutions inaugurated under the Morrill act of 1871, 
and of the growing popularity of these colleges 
throughout the country. In speaking of the relation- 
ship existing between the professor and student in 
college life, Mr. J. E. Wilder '82 laid stress on the 
value of close personal contact between the two, 
stating that therein lay the great superiority of the 
smaller, well equipped college over the large university. 



DR. CHARLES A. GOESSMANN. 

Charles Anthony Goessmann was born in Naum- 
burg in the grand duchy of Hesse, Germany, on the 
thirteenth of June, 1827, just eighty years ago. He 
is the son of Dr. Henry Goessmann, a fellow student 
of Frederick Wohler, who became professor of chem- 
istry in the University of Goettingen. Prof. Goess- 
mann, after spending his boyhood in Fritzlar in Hesse, 
and passing through the schools and a term of instruc- 
tion in pharmacy, entered the University of Goet- 
tingen in the spring of 1850. After studying chem- 
istry, botany, physics, geology, mineralogy and zool- 
ogy for a year and a half, upon the advice of Prof. 
Wohler, his fathers friend, he changed his original 
plan of being a pharmacist and accepted an assist- 
antship in chemistry in Wohler's laboratory. Upon 
taking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, preparing 
at this time his dissertation on the Composition of 
Cantharides, he became a primt docent in the same 
laboratory and gradually became first assistant in 
chemistry. In 1857, after an extended tour through 
the German and Austrian universities, he accepted 
an offer from the Eastwick Brothers of Philadelphia 
to take the position of scientific director of their 
extensive sugar refineries in that city. He came to 
America with the intention of eventually returning to 
Germany to teach technical chemistry in some uni- 
versity, where he expected to make use of the know- 
ledge and experience he would have gathered in a 
trip through America and the West Indies and other 
countries on this side of the Atlantic. But after the 
lapse of a few years he became so attached to America 
and its institutions, and observed so large a field of 
work open to the services of the technical chemist, 
that he decided to remain in this country and make 
it his home. After finishing his engagement in 
Philadelphia, he spent some time in studying the 
process of sugar refining in the West Indies. He 
was urged to remain here permamently, but he 
prefered to return to the United States, and accepted 
the position of chemist of the Onondaga Salt Com- 
pany of Syracuse, N. Y. Here he remained until 
1869, directing the manufactures of the salt com- 
pany.' During this period he made a very extensive 
study of saline deposits and brines in various American 
localities, such as Godrich, Conn., Saginaw, Mich., 
and Petite Anse Island, La. It was during part of 



this time that he spent a portion of each year as 
professor of physics and chemistry in the Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute. In January of 1869 Prof. 
Goessmann resigned his position with the salt company 
and answered a call from his old friend and classmate 
at Goettingen, President Clarke of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, to the professorship of chemistry 
at that institution. In 1873 he was elected chemist 
to the State Board of Agriculture, and thus ex-officio 
a member of that board. His work on this board 
has been continous ever since, and it has resulted in 
the solution of many important questions in agricul- 
ture and agricultural chemistry. In 1878 he suc- 
ceeded in securing the establishment of the Massa- 
chusetts Experiment Station, which finally became 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, 
established in May 1882. He was then elected 
director and chemist of the experiment station by the 
board of control, and remained thus until 1895, when 
the station was merged with the Hatch Experiment 
Station of the college, and since that time he has 
served as chemist in charge of the work on soils and 
fertilizirs and fertilizer control. Since 1833 he has 
served as analist to the state Board of Health. In 
July of 1880 the American Association of Agricul- 
tural Chemists was established in the city of Wash- 
ington, and Prof. Goessmann was elected its first 
president. At about this time he was elected chem- 
ist of the state of North Carolina, but he declined the 
offer. His main work has been with the Massachu- 
setts Experiment Station, In organizing and directing 
its work during the early years, and developing its 
field of usefulness. During the early years he also 
did most of the teaching in chemistry, but in later 
years, with the grewth of the department and the 
division of the work among assistants, he has had less to 
do with the elementary teachings of chemistry. 

Since his entrance to the University of Goettingen, 
Prof. Goessmann has continued along many lines his 
investigations and researches up to the present time. 
After coming to Amherst he read papers on several 
occasions on salt and its uses in agriculture, and this 
marked the beginning of his works on fertilizers, a 
work which can never be over-estimated. In 1872 
he began the investigation of commercial fertilizers, 
and reported his results in 1873 to the State Board 
of Agriculture, the report being highly valued and 






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203 



finally resulting in the passage of the law regulating 
the sale and manufacture of fertilizers in Massachu- 
setts. In 1874 he was appointed to study the work- 
ing and management of salt marshes. Again his 
studies resulted In great economic value. In 1876 
he began the study of fertilization of sugar cane plan- 
tations, particularly in Bayon Teche, La. At this 
time also he began his work of contribution to the 
chemistry of fruit culture and the chemistry of foods, 
and in 1878 published valuable contributions to the 
chemistry of both wild and cultivated grapes. In 
1881 he entered upon a valuable series of experiments 
on the production of sorghum sugar in the United 
States, having received the appointment to do so 
from the National Acadamy of Science. For many 
years since coming to Massachusetts Agricultural 
College he has been an enthusiastic and frequent 
lecturer. In connection with the experiment station 
his work has been, as already indicated, of the creative 
and progressive type. The people of Massachusetts 
and throughout the country owe a great deal to Dr. 
Goessmann for his extensive researches and discover- 
ies along agricultural chemical lines. 

The field of Prof. Goessmann 's work is thus seen 
to cover a considerable range of activities. As a 
teacher at the college and of the public he has exerted 
a wide and lasting influence. His investigations, 
especially in agricultural chemical lines, have been 
a leading factor In the development of agriculture 
in Massachusetts during the past four decades. In 
matters of establishing on a firm footing the fertilizer 
content of the state, his public services have been 
exceedingly valuable. His work along these lines 
has been widely copied all over the country by pro- 
gressive states. Prof. Goessmann's special services 
to the college have been in the development of the 
department of chemistry, attaching to it a reputation 
of national fame. But while his duties have been 
especially devoted to the Department of Chemistry, 
he has always taken a deep interest In questions of 
college policy and government, and been only too 
glad to talk with the students on topics of college 
import, giving them such kindly and friendly advice 
as his wide experience could offer. All of Dr. Goess- 
mann's students came to love and reverence him, 
admiring his sunny disposition, genial and kind, and 
his greatness of heart. All the friends of the insti- 



tution, both old and young, deeply regret that it has 
become necessary for him to withdraw from active 
association with the college and experiment station 
work, but are glad that he will at least retain a nom- 
inal relation to the institution which he has come to 
love, as consulting chemist of the experiment station. 
A fitting recognition of Dr. Goessmann's services to 
the American public is evidenced in the action of the 
Carnegie Foundation in granting him a pension, an 
honor but rarely accorded to a teacher at a state 
institution. 



PARLEY A. RUSSELL. 

Mr. Parley A. Russell of Great Barrington was 
recently appointed by Govenor Guild, as trustee to 
succeed the late Mr. Merritt I. Wheeler. Mr. Russell 
is somewhat past middle life, of an agreeable person- 
ality. He is a retired manufacturer and evidently 
a gentleman of means. At present he is quite active 
in the affairs of his native town and is manager of the 
local electric light company. He has never, so far 
as it is known, been engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
but it is understood that he is interested in the 
advancement of all agricultural interests, and espe- 
cially in the work which our agricultural colleges are 

doing. 

^ 

DRAPER HALL. 

The trustees of Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
at their meeting June 7 in Boston, voted favorably 
upon the following recommendation of the faculty of 
the college regarding the name of the dining hall. 

"To the Trustees of Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. 

Gentlemen : — 

The faculty of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College understands that it Is a rule of your Board 
that none of the college buildings shall be named for 
any person while he is yet living. They feel that in 
the death of Mr. James Draper the college has lost 
an active, hard working and loyal friend, and that It 
is desirable to perpetuate his memory in some way at 
the college. Remembering the interest he took In 
the building of the Dining Hall, and his active parti- 
cipation in the cares and duties connected therewith, 
we would accordingly recommend to the Board that 
the Dining Hall be now authoritatively designated 
"Draper Hall," and hope that this recommendation 
will meet with your approval." 



BASE BALL REVIEW. 

We have just closed one of our most successful 
seasons in baseball. While the number of games 
won may not be so large as in some preceeding years, 
yet our scores with even the best of the college teams 
show that Massachusetts has been an opponent worthy 
of any. After a somewhat bad start at Holy Cross 
the team pulled itsdf together and has played good 
ball and has been growing stronger all the season. We 
held the crack Brown team to one run and it took 
them eleven innings to get that. It was an instance 
of fortune smiling on our adversaries rather than on 
us. Dartmouth beats us 4-0, Amherst 3-0, and 
Williams 4-2. While we lost these games yet they 
show the caliber of the 1907 team. 

Our schedule this year has been longer than in 
preceeding years, having 22 games. This year we 
played the University of Vermont for the first time 
in three years. If there is one criticism on the 
schedule which is just it is this. For years we have 
played Holy Cross in our first game. Now it would 
be much better for the teams if they could play much 
easier teams. The hardest games should be sche- 
duled along into the season as far as possible. 

This year we loose only one man by graduation and 
the prospects for an even better team next year are 
bright. We expect some good men in the incoming 
class. It is every student's duty to support the team 
to the best of his ability. There is no reason why we 
cannot make as enviable a record in baseball as we 
have made in football, if every fellow will forget his 
own personai feelings and work for the best with true 
Massachusetts spirit. 



TENNIS. 



The interfraternity tennis tournament came to a 
close Thursday when H. K. Hayes, Kappa Sigma, 
defeated Milford H. Clark, C. S. C. Much interest 
was taken in this match because of the fact that the 
contestants were very evenly matched. Both Hayes 
and Clark played exceptionally cool and steady games 
from the start to finish, but Hayes was better at criti- 
cal times. The preliminary and semi-final rounds 
were played earlier in the week. The most exciting 
match was between Hayes and Bartlett, it being the 



fastest in the tournament. Much interest has been 
shown in the tournament this year and all the contest- 
ants have worked hard for the trophy cup offered by 
the fraternity conference. Summary : 

Preliminaries -J. R. Parker, Kappa Sigma, won 
from H. Jen, Q. T. V., 7-5, 6-4, 6-4. 

Milford H. Clark, C. S. C, won from E. H. 
Shaw, Phi Sigma Kappa, 6-1, 6-0, 6-4. 

H. K. Hayes, Kappa Sigma, won from C. R. 
Webb, C. S. C, 6-3, 6-1, 6-2. 

E. G. Bartlett, Phi Sigma Kappa, won from J. 
Noyes, Q. T. V., 6-3, 6-8, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3. 

Semi-Finals H. K. Hayes, Kappa Sigma, won 
from E. G. Bartlett, Phi Sigma Kappa, 4-6, 6-2, 
10-12, 6-3, 6 2. 

Milford H. Clark, C. S. C, won from J. R. 
Parker, Kappa Sigma, 6-2, 6 4, 4-6, 7-5. 

Finals— H. K. Hayes, Kappa Sigma, won from 
Milford H. Clark, C. S. C, 6-8, 6-4, 6-1, 6-4. 

JUNIOR BANQUET. 

The 1908 junior banquet, tended to the class by 
the class of 1910, was held at the Garde Hotel, 
Hartford, May 31. The juniors arrived in Hartford 
during the day, many of them visiting some of the 
famous Hartford parks and the capital grounds. At 
8-30 the members of the class gathered at the ban- 
quet table, the general consensus of opinion being that 
the banquet was the best the class ever held. The 
menu was an excellent one and the service of first 
quality. After the banquet the cigars were passed 
around, the chairs pushed back, and toastmaster K, 
E. Gillette, with a few appropriate opening remarks, 
called for toasts from the following members of the 
class : F. E. Thurston, A. F. Hamburger, D. P. 
Milhr, H. C. Chase, A. J. Farley, R. H. Verbeck, 
J. A. Hyslop, A. J. Whooldon, E. P. Philbrick and 
R. R. Blake. Enthusiasm for class and above all 
college were the main opics of discussion, inter- 
spersed now and then with remarks from the class 
wits and humorists. 

The committee on arrangements was H. M. Jen- 
nison, A. J. Farley and P. W. Farrar. 









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BASEBALL BRIEFS. 

Tuesday, May 28, the baseball team played Bos- 
ton college at Boston and were defeated by a score of 
12 to 5. 

The team then journeyed to Orono when they were 
to have played the University of Maine on Wednesday, 
but the game was canceled because of wet grounds. 

On Decoration day two games were played. In 
the morning Beddeford won by a score of 5-0 and in 
the afternoon the team was defeated by Portland in 
a close contest, the final score being 3-2. 

What proved to be the last game of the season 
was played at Cushing, Tuesday, June 4, Cushing 
winning a 1-0 game characterized by light batting by 
both teams and poor work by the umpire. 

Boston college was to have played on the campus 
last Saturday but failed to put in an appearance. 



Dfp&r-tmfrvf ^lo-t?s. 



THE DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE. 
By vote of the board of trustees, the department of 
horticulture will be reorganized July 1 into a Division 
of Horticulture, including a department of pomology, 
a department of landscape gardening, a department ot 
floriculture, and eventually, as time and demand 
warrant, a department of forestry, a department of 
market gardening, department of arboriculture, etc. 
Prof. F. A. Waugh has been appointed head of the 
new Division, with the title of professor of general 
horticulture and professor of landscape gardening. 
The department of pomology will be under Prof. F. 
C. Sears as professor of pomology. The department 
of landscape gardening will be under Professor Waugh. 
The department of floriculture will be under Prof. E. 
A. White as assistant professor of floriculture. For 
the better execution of the work of the Division, the 
various department heads included under the Division, 
together with all instructors, assistants and foremen, 
will be organized Into a Horticultural Council. The 
Horticultural Council will have no legislative powers, 
and no formal votes on matters pertaining to the 
Division and the work of the various departments will 
be taken, but the Council will serve as a general 
advisory and consulting body, whose duties are to 



promote a general understanding throughout the Divis- 
ion of the work to be done and methods of doing it. 
This, in brief, is a record of the changes which are 
to take place in the department of horticulture. The 
significance of these changes is great. The depart- 
ment of horticulture was originally a branch of the 
department of botany. From this beginning the 
department of horticulture has grown steadily in all 
ways. Today there are more teachers and officers 
in the department, carrying on more lines of work, 
than were included in the whole college during its 
early years. Other departments have grown in corre- 
sponding proportions. The present action of the 
trustees in regard to a Division of Horticulture is 
primarily significant of an effort to place the various 
departments upon the best possible working basis, with 
thorough organization and definite assignment of duties. 
The department of horticulture is the tirst to undergo 
this reorganization. In the second place, these 
changes are significant of an appreciation of the work 
which Professor Waugh has done during the five short 
years since he first came to Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College towards organizing the work of the horti- 
cultural department, improving the courses already 
offered, and establishing the new courses of landscape 
gardening, pomology, arboriculture, etc. Professor 
Waugh has proved himself an organizer of tireless 
energy, with keen foresight into the demands made 
upon the college and it courses of instruction. He 
has fought for and secured one of the best horticul- 
tural buildings in the country, handsome as well as 
practical, with an equipment which cannot be paralleled 
anywhere. It is indeed fitting that he should be 
placed at the head of the new Division, and that under 
his guidance the department of horticulture should be 
the department first chosen for reorganization as a 
pattern for what eventually will be done to all the 
departments of the college work. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE. 

Various improvements are still going on at Wilder 
Hall. A new stereopticon has been added to the 
equipment, also five dozen new drawing boards and 
another camera specially designed for field work. 
Some additional furniture on the reading room porch 
makes that feature still more attractive, while the 
ornamental effect of the west entrance is considerably 



enhanced by the addition of two new roman 
seats of cast cement and of distinguished design. 
This department has secured $1000 from the main- 
teniance fund for the erection of a tool house. It is 
to be built just to the west of the lower end of the 
horticultural barn. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Thirty-four juniors desire to elect senior entomology 
next term. At present there is only equipment for 
twelve, and room for twenty in the laboratory; If more 
equipment could be secured at the best 14 men will 
have to be turned down. It seems as though an effort 
should be made to find room for senior work at least. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

DEPARTMENT OF FERTILIZERS. 

The analysis of the officially collected fertilizers is 
now well underway. The first fertilizer bulletin will 
probably be Issued in July. 



Alu 



mm. 



71. — W. H. Bowker attended the semi-centennial 
anniversary of the Michigan Agricultural College as a 
delegate from the board of trustees of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

'73. — A volume has recently been published by 
the Macmillan Company entitled "Outlines of Crimi- 
nal Law," by courtesy of Stanhope Kenny, LL. D., 
revised and adapted for American scholars by James 
H. Webb, B. S., LL. B., instructor in criminal law 
and procedure and lecturer on medical jurisprudence 
in the Law Department of Yale University. The 
collaborator, Hon. James H. Webb, is a distin- 
guished and loyal alumnus of Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College in the class of 1873. It would also be 
a matter of congratulation if this adaptation of the 
English book for American students and readers 
should receive the favorable consideration of teach- 
ers in other colleges and universities as a text-book, 
not alone for students who intend to follow the profes- 
sion of law, but for others as well who are pursuing 
a course of liberal studies along those branches of 
learning which concern most directly the social wel- 
fare of the community. The Civil Law attracted the 



attention of large numbers of students in the Univer- 
sities of the Middle Ages, and it would seem that the 
law of Public Wrongs, as it has been evolved and 
developed by the Common Law, ought now to find 
some place in the curriculum of all our higher institu- 
tions of learning. 

'81. — A few weeks ago Gov. Guild reappointed Dr. 
Austin Peters chief of the Cattle Bureau Mass. 
State Board of Agriculture. Many members of the 
Boston Kennel Club have opposed his reappointment 
on the ground that he was unjust In measures taken 
against dogs. However his long record as a compe- 
tent public official was not to be thrown lightly aside. 
He has made a good chief of the Cattle Bureau and 
it would have been unfortunate for the state to have 
lost his services in that capacity. 

'81-— A. W. Spauldlng and Max Umbrecht have 
associated under the firm name of Spaulding & 
Umbrecht for the practice of Architecture. Present 
offices, 422-423 Globe Block, Seattle, Wash. 

'82. — A reunion banquet will be held at the Pros- 
pect House, Amity St., beginning at 10 p. m., Tues- 
day of Commencement week. Nearly all of the 
class have signified their Intention of being present. 

'82.— Prof. Levi P. Taft, Agricultural College, 
Michigan, entertained at a dinner at his home dur- 
ing the Michigan semi-centennial the following M. A. 
C. alumni : Prof. W. P. Brooks, 75; Dr. W. E. 
Stone, '82, President of Purdue University ; J. L. 
Hills, '81, Director of the Vermont Agricultural 
Experiment Station; Dr. G. E. Stone, '86; Dr. S. 
W. Fletcher, '96, Professor of Horticulture, Michi- 
gan Agricultural College; J. R. Kelton, '05, 
Instructor in Zoology, Michigan Agricultural College; 
C. P. Halligan, '03, Instructor in Landscape Gar- 
dening, Michigan Agricultural College; Dr. E. W. 
Allen, '85, Vice- Director of the office of Experi- 
ment Stations, U. S. Department of Agriculture; E. 
A. Bishop, '83, Head of Agricultural Department 
of Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va. ; Dr. H. J. 
Wheeler, '83, Director of Rhode Island Experiment 
Station; Dr. J. H. Washburn, 78, Director of 
National Farm School, Farm School, Pa. 

'82.— President W. E. Stone of Purdue Univer- 
sity had conferred upon him by the Michigan Agricul- 






ao6 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



207 



tural College during its Semi-Centennial, the degree 
of L. L. D. During the exercises, Dr. Stone pre- 
sented an Interesting paper on "The Development of 
Engineering Education." 

EIGHTY-TWO REUNION. 

The program for the twenty-fifth anniversary reunion 
of the class of '82 that will be held on June 18 is as 
follows: At 9 a. m. gather at the fountain. From 
9-30 to 10 a.m. stroll about the grounds, visiting 
buildings, both old and new, the '82 class tree, the 
'82 row of trees, returning to the chapel to attend 
the public anniversary exercises. At 11 a. m. 
assemble at the Veterinary Laboratory for an informal 
reception and luncheon. Class banquet at 10 p. m. 

'83. D. 0. Nourse, who retired from the profes- 
sorship of Agriculture at the Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute, Blacksburg, Va., about a year ago, has 
been doing some experiment work with poultry at the 
Rhode Island Experiment Station. His intention is 
to eventually purchase a fruit and poultry farm In the 
immediate vicinity of Boston. 

'83. — S. M. Holman has represented the town of 
Attleboro very acceptably at the present session of 
the Legislature. 

'83. — H. J. Wheeler delivered a very strong paper 
on the general subject of Research Work at the 
Baton Rouge meeting of the Association of American 
Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations. Dr. 
Wheeler will probably be present at the Commence- 
ment exercises of this college. 

'85. — Dr. E. W. Allen has an interesting article 
entitled 4, The Evolution of the Experiment Station" 
in the Cornell Countryman for June. 

EIGHTY-SEVEN. 

Dr. Edward R. Flint, Gainesville, Fla. 

William M. Ball, (ex-'87) Northampton. 

Frank S. Clarke, (ex- '87) Bookkeeper Draper 
Company, Hopedale. 

Ceorge P. Robinson, (ex- '87) Real Estate, Sac- 
ramento, Cal. 

The '87 class will observe twentieth anniversary at 
Draper Hall, Tuesday, June 18, at 6-30 p. m. 

An excellent photograph of William H. Caldwell 
is published in the Country Gentleman for May 30. 



Mr. Caldwell has just been re-elected for his four- 
teenth term as secretary of the American Guernsey 
Cattle Club. 

'88.— Married in Brookline, on June 5, N. A. 
Rose to Miss Rebecca Consens. Mr. and Mrs. Rose 
will live in North Amherst. 

'92. —Prof. J. B. Knight of Poonca College, 
Poonca, India, is spending some time in this country 
and is now at his home in Belchertown. He will be 
in Amherst for Commencement. 

'92. — A reunion banquet will be held at 6 p. m. on 
Tuesday, June 18, at the home of Frank Wood on 
South Prospect St. A large attendance has been 
assured. 

'94. — The class of '94 will hold its reunion banquet 
at Draper Hall on Tuesday June 18 at 9 p. m. It is 
expected that more than twenty members of the 
class will be present. 

Ex-'96. — h. F. Howe, Cibu, Philippine Islands, 
Box 157. 

'97. — Mr. and Mrs. George A. Drew will hold a 
reception on Monday, June 17, from 4-6 p. m., at 
the residence of Prof. William P. Brooks. 

'97.- -J. Albert Emrich, Bible school pastor and 
superintendent, First Christian Church, Sacramento, 
Cal. Address Y. M. C. A., Sacramento. 

'97. — A reunion banquet will be held at Draper 
Hall on Tuesday, June 18 at 6 p. m. More than 
half the class will be present. 

Ex-'97. — George R. Mansfield, Department of 
Geology, Harvard University, Cambridge. 

Ex- '97. — C. F. Sherman, McComb, Mississippi, 
Roadmaster for Louisiana Division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad. 

Ex- '97. — Frederick W. Barclay, Horticultural 
Expert, has recently accepted the position of super- 
intendent of Parks of Wilkes Barre, Pa. Address 
68 Union St., Wilkes Barre. 

'98.— S. W. Wiley, now of the firm of Wiley & 
Hoffman of Baltimore, Md., is doing an extensive 
business especially in the analysis of all kinds of fer- 
tilizing material. Mr. Wiley recently was offered 
and declined a very attractive position as chemist 
with a large southern manufacturing concern. 



NINETEEN-TWO. 

Belden, J. Herbert, 1021 Hammond Building, 
Detroit Mich., Special Agent for Fidelity & Casualty 
Co. of New York. 

Bodfish, Henry L., 56 Olivia St., Derby, Conn., 
Civil Engineer, New York, New Haven & Hudson 
River Railroad. 

Carpenter, Thorne M., 64 Church St., Middletown, 
Conn., Chemist, Nutrition Research Laboratory, and 
Assistant in Chemistry, Wesleyan University. 

Church, Frederick R., Mohonk Lake, N. Y., 
Superintendent of Estate. 

Claflin, Leander C, Media, Penn., with Claflin, 
Athletic Goods, Philadelphia. 

Cooley, Orrln F., Springfield, City Engineer's 
Office. 

Dacy, Arthur L., Turner Hill, Ipswich, Assistant 
Farm Superintendant. 

Dellea, John M., R. F. D. No. I, Great Barring- 
ton, with H. L. Frost, Forester and Entomologist. 

Dwyer, Chester E., Nebraska City, Neb., Fore- 
man of J. Sterling Morton Estate. 

Gates, Victor A., 408-12 East Markham St., Little 
Rock, Ark. with Scott- Mayer Commission Co. 

Hall, John C, Sudbury, Farmer. 

Hodgkiss, Harold E., Geneva, N. Y., Assistant 
Entomologist New York State Experiment Station. 

Kinney, Charles M., Redlands, Cal., Instructor In 
Music, Public Schools. 

Knight, Howard L., 1 1 52- 1 7th St. N. W. Wash- 
ington, D. C, Editorial Assistant Office of Experi- 
ment Stations, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Lewis, Claude I., M. S., Corvallis, Ore., Horti- 
culturist, Oregon Experiment Station. 

Morse, Ransom W., Fall River, Business Manager, 
Fall River Herald. 

Paul, Herbert A., Escanaba, Mich., Forest Ran- 
ger, U. S. Forest Service. 

Plumb, Frederick H., Norwalk, Conn., Instructor 
Conn. Military Academy. 

Saunders, Edward B., Machias, Me., Agent for 
Bangor Beef Co. 

Smith, S. Leroy, West 23d St., Y. M. C. A. 
Building, New York City, Educational Director. 



West, D. Nelson, Hatfield, Wis., with J. G. 
White & Co., Construction Engineers. 

At the 36th annual meeting of the Middletown 
Sclentifc Association held in the Scott Laboratory of 
Physics, Wesleyan Unixersity, on Tuesday, June 1 I , 
secretary of the association, T. M. Carpenter, 
delivered an address on -'The Energy Output during 
Digestion." A description was given of a series of 
experiments carried on in the respiration calorimeter 
which have been In progress for the last two years. 
In these experiments the carbon dioxide and heat 
elimination and oxygen absorption have been studied 
after special kinds of foods have been given to the 
subjects. A study of pulse and respiration has been 
made along with the other factors. Some samples 
of the foods used were exhibited and a brief discus- 
sion of the preliminary results was given. 

'03.— Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Latimer of Simsbury, 
Conn, have announced the engagement of their 
daughter, Lena, to A. Vincent Osmun. The wedding 
will take place June 27. 

'03.— Miss Sarah Etta Cowls, only daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Cowls of North Amherst, 
was united in marriage, Wednesday evening, June 12, 
at the home of the bride's parents to Gerald Dennl- 
son Jones. The house was beautifuly decorated with 
palms and potted plants. Rev. John P. Manwell of 
North Amherst performed the ceremony. The 
bridesmaid was Gertrude Sanford Jones of South 
Framingham. The best man was Howard C. Bowen, 
'03, of Needham. 

'03.— Philip W. Brooks of Imperial, Cal., will 
spend Commencement at the college. 

'04. — E. A. Back, for the past three years a grad- 
uate studant at M. A. C, receives this Commence- 
ment his degree of Ph. D., his major being in Ento- 
mology. Mr. Back will become a special field agent 
of the Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, as first assistant to Dr. A. W. Morrill, 
'00, in the white fly investigations in Florida. His 
work will probably be on the fungi of the white fly and 
hymenoptereus parasites. 

Ex- '07. — Miss Vida R. French is a candidate for 
the degree of B. S. in Agriculture at Cornell Univer- 
sity this June. After graduating she expects to get 
a Master's degree at Iowa Agricultural College. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It is a Natural Manure. 

Grows Strong, Vigorous, Healthy Plants That Resist Disease 

DR. (1KOKOK K. STONK Professor of Itotany at the Mn*s 
Agricultural College, an«l Professor <>l I'lunt Diseates nt the 
Hatch Experiment Station, Amherst, Mans., writes to our 
Agricultural Expert a» follows: 

" I will say that I consider the formula which you 
prepared for Mr. Pre»cott im.i applied hy him on hi* 
beds was very effectual in controlling the asparagus 
rust. The application of your formula and other fea- 
tures which were carried out In the management of 
these beds convince me that it constituted the best 
■ lemon tration of the control of asparagus rust which 
has ever been made In this country." 

GENUINE PERUVIAN 0CAPO formed the basis of the 
above mentioned formula. It was used on the asparagus beds 
of 0, W. Prkhcott., Concord, Mass., the largest individual 
grower of Asparagus in New England. We also offer 

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FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
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E. A. THOMPSON. 

Inventory has brought to light some slow movers. To hasten 
this tardy merchandise an 

OI3I3 l^WIC^HJ DISPLAY 

is now open. 

Pruning Shear*, - - - were 35c. are 22c. 

Vest Pocket Lights, - - «• 76c. M 49c. 

$1.00 Watches, - - - 87c. 

Vest Pocket Spring Scale, weighs to 15 lb.," 50c. "23c. 

The regular line of riNK CUTLERY Is always to be remem 

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